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  1. #1
    Senior Member zeezil's Avatar
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    Head of U.S. Office of Citizenship concerned about assimilat

    Head of U.S. Office of Citizenship concerned about assimilation
    By Eunice Moscoso | Friday, February 8, 2008, 03:24 PM

    Alfonso Aguilar, head of the U.S. Office of Citizenship, said this week he is concerned about social and political cohesion in the future as the country becomes more diverse and does not have one dominant racial or ethnic category.

    “We need to strengthen assimilation efforts, we need to look at citizenship from that perspective, because if not, I believe that 20 or 30 years down the road we may have serious challenges,
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    “We need to strengthen assimilation efforts, we need to look at citizenship from that perspective, because if not, I believe that 20 or 30 years down the road we may have serious challenges,

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    So the head of the citizenship bureau thinks that immigrants are not assimilating fast enough?I wonder what ever gave him that idea?

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    Senior Member legalatina's Avatar
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    Gee, it took him 20 years to realize that? Assimilation....YA ES HORA. First, how about NO MORE visas for countries with the largest population of illegal aliens....MEXICO, HONDURAS, GUATEMALA, EL SALVADOR, NICARAGUA, etc.

    Second, no more chain migration. Institute merit-based criteria only....education, work experience and English language skills. Nothing else.

    Thirdly, reduce legal immigration as a time-out by 3/4. No visas to people from terrorist sponsoring nations at all until further notice, no acceptance of
    "refugees" from there either...let some them apply to Canada, Mexico or anywhere else.

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    [quote]We need to strengthen assimilation efforts, we need to look at citizenship from that perspective, because if not, I believe that 20 or 30 years down the road we may have serious challenges,

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    Senior Member butterbean's Avatar
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    [quote]“We need to strengthen assimilation efforts, we need to look at citizenship from that perspective, because if not, I believe that 20 or 30 years down the road we may have serious challenges,

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    Senior Member SOSADFORUS's Avatar
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    There is more here than meets the eye....not sure yet what it is but something does not smell right about this....

    Why would anyone want too copy anything Great Britain is doing .....Helllooo they are headed for the cliff faster than we are or down the tolit how ever you want to look at it

    Of couse it is a government agency so what can you expect!!
    AUT*AGERE*AUT*MORI (EITHER ACTION OR DEATH)

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    Why would anyone want too copy anything Great Britain is doing .....Helllooo they are headed for the cliff faster than we are or down the tolit how ever you want to look at it
    Exactly. I hear that everyday. I know when I lived in Nebraska the churches took it on themselves to "adopt a family" and be someone any new immigrants could turn to for help. The churches offered free English classes and they also helped have activities so they could meet other immigrants from their home countries and mesh then with the people of the community. They took it on themselves. Why does everything have to done by the government? The article where they talked about this was immigrants or refugees from Somalia. They had never seen a stove or any of the appliances we have. They had cooking classes and all sorts of things to help them. Helped them set-up an account in the bank....literally everything. People donated furniture and such to get them started. They didn't have to look for work or find an apartment...that was part of what they (the government I guess) did to set it up for them. They didn't get to pick where they wanted to go....they were sent where they were needed for work. So maybe the company that hired them did it. I think they had everything covered for 3 months to get used to everything and then another 9 months with food stamps and medicade to give them a chance to put money away etc. learn about budgeting and all that and then they were on their own.

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    Senior Member legalatina's Avatar
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    My parents, naturalized immigrants themselves from Latin America....were more than happy to sponsor and help a few families of Vietnamese (The Boat People) who were brought in by the local YWCA. They were the nicest, most greatful people ever... my father hired all the males. The children enrolled in schools and became English proficient in a very short time, due to instruction by immersion. Plus many of the Vietnamese were already bilingual in French and their native tongue. They were so happy to see their children succeed in school and they sure did academically very, very well. As a child, I was so happy to bring some the girls into my Brownie Troop and they blended in right away and had so much fun. It was cute to see them so proud to march in our fourth of july parade!

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    My parents, naturalized immigrants themselves from Latin America....were more than happy to sponsor and help a few families of Vietnamese (The Boat People) who were brought in by the local YWCA. They were the nicest, most greatful people ever... my father hired all the males. The children enrolled in schools and became English proficient in a very short time, due to instruction by immersion. Plus many of the Vietnamese were already bilingual in French and their native tongue. They were so happy to see their children succeed in school and they sure did academically very, very well. As a child, I was so happy to bring some the girls into my Brownie Troop and they blended in right away and had so much fun. It was cute to see them so proud to march in our fourth of july parade
    That is a beautiful story. That is what I have been used to seeing with past immigrants who came here....it really touches you to see them so proud and thankful to be here. Had a friend who was so proud to write her first tax check to the government.
    LOL....Can't say I'm that thrilled but she said it was so good to be contributing citizen and giving something back to this country. She felt like when they were repairing the roads...that yes...this time she could say that road I helped pay for. She felt like a contributing part of this country. Wish we had 10000 more just like her.

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