Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

  1. #1
    Super Moderator Ratbstard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New Alien City-(formerly New York City)
    Posts
    12,685

    Self-deportation will make Mitt Romney go blind

    philly.com
    Posted by Will Bunch @ 5:18 PM
    Tuesday, January 24, 2012



    The news cycle in the 2012 presidential race seems down to about 2-3 hours. Indeed, harmful as it was to his broader effort, Mitt Romney might have been relieved to issue his tax returns this morning if for no other reason than this: It took the focus off what I thought was a major blunder in the Monday night debate that was televised on NBC.


    I'm talking about this:


    ROMNEY: Well, the answer is self-deportation, which is people decide they can do better by going home because they can`t find work here because they don`t have legal documentation to allow them to work here. And so we`re not going to round people up.


    The way that we have in this society is to say, look, people who have come here legally would, under my plan, be given a transition period and the opportunity during that transition period to work here, but when that transition period was over, they would no longer have the documentation to allow them to work in this country. At that point, they can decide whether to remain or whether to return home and to apply for legal residency in the United States, get in line with everybody else. And I know people think but that`s not fair to those that have come here illegally.

    It's a fascinating idea -- the modern GOP's obsession with the sanctity of free markets leading inevitably to "a free-market solution" to immigration. Since he'll make it impossible for undocumented immigrants to get jobs, Romney argues, the marketplace will make them go back to Ecuador or Thailand or wherever. The biggest problem with Romney's idea is that there is nothing in the history of American immigration over the last two centuries to make anyone think this would happen, even if President Romney pulls off his Orwellian coup of a step towards a national ID card.


    But in the short term, "self-deportation" is a bigger political problem for Romney.


    Why? I think it makes him look weak in the eyes of Tea Party voters, who must be influential in Florida politics or they would not now have a governor as horrific as Rick Scott. The real base of the GOP doesn't want a tidy "free market" solution to immigration issues, even if such a solution actually existed. No, it wants blood. OK, maybe not blood, but pink underwear. That's the tough-guy approach to immigration adopted by the right's hero on this matter, Phoenix-area sheriff Joe Arpaio, who also goes out regularly on raids and wants power to racially profile and make lots and lots of arrests, which isn't "self-deportation" in any sense of the word. So I think Romney's stance makes him look weak going into Tuesday's primary.


    And it probably doesn't help him much with a huge bloc of Cuban-Americans in South Florida who tend to vote Republican -- this notion that the only way to deal with people in the United States without papers is simply to drive them away. I could be wrong. We'll see.


    The New York Times has a good piece up this afternoon about the immigration issue in the Florida primary. I thought this sums up why "self-deportation" won't work:


    But, Ms. Pestana, who owns an assisted living center, said she viewed Mr. Gingrich’s position on immigration — an issue she considers secondary — as more realistic. Her son recently tried to hire American citizens for his roofing company, she said, and found no takers.

    “Who will fix our roofs and pick our tomatoes?” asked Ms. Pestana.


    Self-deportation will make Mitt Romney go blind | Philly | 01/24/2012
    If a man sneaks into your home he is a burglar, not an undocumented tenant you must provide for!

  2. #2
    Senior Member MontereySherry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,028
    Drum Roll Take it from here Steve!

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    somewhere near Mexico I reckon!
    Posts
    9,900
    “Who will fix our roofs and pick our tomatoes?” asked Ms. Pestana.
    Exactly Lady! "You! Suck!" it seems Frank Sharry and the rest are really upset with Mr. Romney!
    On Immigration, Romney Stands with Alabama, Nativist Groups and Tom Tancredo

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Ratbstard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New Alien City-(formerly New York City)
    Posts
    12,685

    In Florida, Romney Plays Down Immigration

    nytimes.com
    By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
    Published: January 24, 2012


    Sid Dinerstein, left, Chairman of the Republican Party of Palm Beach County, and Kathy Bertorello, President of the Republican Club of Delray Beach, speak to supporters after a Mitt Romney speech at the Palm Beach County Convention Center.

    WEST PALM BEACH, FLA. — When Mitt Romney pulled in for a campaign rally here recently, he pointedly left his tough stance against illegal immigration far behind in South Carolina, where he had trumpeted the issue repeatedly.

    It was a tactical decision designed to avoid irritating Florida’s coveted 450,000 Hispanic Republican voters, a group that is overwhelmingly Cuban-American, as he headed into next Tuesday’s presidential primary here, political analysts say.

    But Mr. Romney, who takes a hard line on illegal immigration, was also banking on the likelihood that the Hispanic voters — a pivotal bloc in a pivotal state — care more about jobs and the distressed economy than green cards and the Dream Act, a proposal to give legal status to some illegal immigrants who came into the United States as children.

    In this, Mr. Romney is right. Unlike many Mexicans and other Hispanics in California and the Southwest, Cuban-Americans do not view immigration as a defining issue in the election. That is because for decades Cubans arriving in the United States have been automatically granted United States residency after their first year here, a holdover from the cold war.

    Puerto Ricans, who make up the second-largest group of Hispanics in Florida, are already citizens and are also less concerned about immigration.

    “The economy is what’s most important to Hispanics here, unemployment,” Sergio Lostal, 59, an unemployed Cuban-American and Romney supporter who arrived in the United States in 1984, said at the rally. “That’s the fundamental issue.”

    Florida’s unemployment rate is 9.9 percent, compared with 8.5 percent nationally; the jobless rate for Hispanics nationally and in Florida is even higher.

    In polls taken before the South Carolina primary, Mr. Romney held a lead in Florida as large as 22 percent over Newt Gingrich and another contender, Rick Santorum. But Mr. Gingrich’s strong victory over Mr. Romney in South Carolina is shaking up some Hispanic Romney supporters, who are taking another look at Mr. Gingrich.

    And while Hispanic voters here have not seized on immigration as an issue, Mr. Gingrich’s more temperate view on illegal immigration has certainly not hurt him. Mr. Gingrich said in a debate on Monday that he would support half of the Dream Act — the part that would grant citizenship to young illegal immigrants who serve in the military, but not those who complete college. Mr. Romney said he agreed with that position. But Mr. Romney and Mr. Santorum had said they would veto the Dream Act as written, a position that could dampen enthusiasm among Latinos in a general election.

    Mr. Gingrich also has proposed allowing many illegal immigrants who have been in the United States a long time the opportunity to stay here as residents. Mr. Romney, like Mr. Santorum, has taken an aggressive stance against legalizing any illegal immigrants who do not deport themselves and apply for green cards from their home country.

    Like the candidates, Florida has long been conflicted over illegal immigration in general; in its last session, the State Senate declined to pass a bill that would have required businesses to verify the immigration status of workers.

    But Mr. Gingrich and Mr. Romney have much in common when it comes to Cuba. Both are making a point of talking tough on Cuba and the Castro brothers, saying they would roll back family travel to the island, among other things.

    Rosa Pestana, 67, a Cuban-American voter who attended the Romney rally nearly two weeks ago, was planning to vote for Mr. Romney at the time. After Mr. Gingrich, a candidate she said is intelligent and experienced, won the South Carolina primary, she was torn. Now she is holding back until after Thursday’s debate to decide who to vote for, adding that she will most likely choose whoever is the front-runner.

    But, Ms. Pestana, who owns an assisted living center, said she viewed Mr. Gingrich’s position on immigration — an issue she considers secondary — as more realistic. Her son recently tried to hire American citizens for his roofing company, she said, and found no takers. “Who will fix our roofs and pick our tomatoes?” asked Ms. Pestana.

    Ms. Pestena’s friend, Elaine Fandino, who had also seesawed between the candidates after South Carolina, said she would vote for Mr. Romney after he “took out the claws” in Monday’s debate. “He is the one,” she said.

    Mr. Romney’s campaign is well organized, and has spent several million dollars on advertising in the state, including one television spot featuring his son Craig, speaking in Spanish about liberty and opportunity. Mr. Romney was also expected to benefit from Florida’s absentee votes, which could break records.

    Not to be outdone, Mr. Gingrich, who was in Miami recently raising money, made the requisite pilgrimage to Versailles, a Cuban restaurant in Little Havana, to sip a cafecito and denounce Fidel and Raúl Castro. Mr. Santorum has ratcheted up his own campaign in the state in the past two weeks.

    Florida has 1.5 million Hispanic voters (13.4 percent of the state’s total electorate), and 32 percent of them are Cuban-Americans, who largely vote Republican and mostly live in South Florida. Today, a majority of Hispanics are Democrats. The state’s booming Puerto Rican population, whose members are generally less partisan than their New York peers but still tend to vote Democratic, are the second-largest group of Latino voters in Florida, making up 28 percent of the Hispanic voters.

    Other large Hispanic groups in the state — Colombians, Nicaraguans, Peruvians — are swing voters who make up a small but growing slice of the electorate.

    Because the vast majority of Cuban-Americans in Florida are citizens who reliably turn out to vote, candidates passionately court them.

    Cuban-American voters often take their cues from South Florida’s two most powerful Republicans in Congress, Representatives Mario Diaz-Balart and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, who are backing Mr. Romney despite his stance on immigration. Senator Marco Rubio, the prized endorsement among Hispanic Republicans, has said he would not take sides in the primary.

    Mr. Diaz-Balart said that he disagreed in general with Mr. Romney and the Republican Party on immigration, but that President Obama had failed to fulfill his campaign promise to provide a path for longtime illegal immigrants to remain here legally.

    “President Obama’s record on immigration is dismal,” he said. But, he added, immigration is an afterthought in this election for most Hispanics here. “The reality is, until you get the economy going, it becomes a secondary issue,” Mr. Diaz-Balart said. “People don’t want to talk about people who are here illegally when people who are here legally don’t have jobs.”

    There was not always such an outpouring of support for Mr. Romney among Hispanics in Florida. In 2008, he came in last among Hispanic voters in the primary, which Senator John McCain of Arizona won.

    In the end, Mr. Obama won 57 percent of the Hispanic vote in the state (a majority of Cuban-Americans cast their ballots for Mr. McCain). But in 2010, Latinos in Florida tilted back to Republicans, helping to elect Mr. Rubio, a Cuban-American, and Gov. Rick Scott, who benefited from Mr. Rubio’s presence on the party’s ticket.

    “Florida Hispanics have always tended to lean toward the establishment candidate,” said Dario Moreno, a professor of political science at Florida International University.

    An aggressive stance on immigration could prove a problem down the road among swing voters if a candidate were perceived to be disparaging Hispanics. Already, some Dream Act supporters are planning to demonstrate at Mr. Romney’s events. Puerto Ricans, who live mostly in the Orlando area and are a crucial swing vote, frown upon attacks that could be perceived as ethnic bias. Latin Americans in Dade County have a vested interest in the immigration debate, and even Cuban-Americans, who are no longer in lockstep with the Republican Party, could react negatively to polarizing language on the issue.

    “They are very sensitive to messages that can be perceived as anti-Hispanic and very sensitive to the immigrant experience,” Professor Moreno said of Cuban-Americans and Puerto Ricans.

    Mr. Gingrich is doing what he can to play up his differences with Mr. Romney on immigration. Democrats, too, are eager to capitalize on the immigration debate. They are already running radio ads in Florida calling Mr. Romney two-faced on the issue. The Republican National Committee, though, recently named a national Hispanic outreach coordinator to go head-to-head with her Democratic counterpart in a bid to win over Latinos.

    Like Mr. Romney, Republican officials are hoping that worries about the economy will trump concerns about immigration.

    “Immigration is an issue that always dictates in the Latino community, and the debate plays an important role in the conversation,” said Bettina Inclan, the Republicans’ Hispanic outreach coordinator, who grew up in Miami. “But the reality is that this election is going to be about the economy.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/25/us...ewanted=2&_r=1
    If a man sneaks into your home he is a burglar, not an undocumented tenant you must provide for!

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    somewhere near Mexico I reckon!
    Posts
    9,900
    This should be interesting! I'm sure it'll all come out here! Wonder if they will translate? Press 2 for English!

    Univision to hold "Meet the Candidates" event with Romney, Gingrich, Santorum in lead up to Fla. GOP primary - Univision News Tumblr

  6. #6
    Administrator ALIPAC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina, United States
    Posts
    50,954
    Blog Entries
    1
    Illegals go home! I think the this writer LIZETTE ALVAREZ is very wrong. In the 1950's during President Eisenhower's Operation Wetback it is estimated that 3 to 5 illegal aliens left on their own accord for every 1 we deported. Also, we have seen illegal aliens peacefully exodus from states that passed strong enforcement legislation like Arizona, Georgia, Oklahoma, and South Carolina. LIZETTE ALVAREZ is completely wrong on her claim there are no examples of how self deportation or attrition enforcement can work.

    W

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Northern Arizona
    Posts
    535
    Take my word for it. As an AZ RESident, It IS working here!

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    somewhere near Mexico I reckon!
    Posts
    9,900
    Quote Originally Posted by AZres View Post
    Take my word for it. As an AZ RESident, It IS working here!
    And they aren't even done with the fence yet! Thanks AZ, listening to the "State of the Union" speech 10mins into it I feel so dirty, I will bathe in scalding hot water and a wire brush!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Judy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    15,566
    Mitt Romney is absolutely right about self-deportation. However, that's a generality, and I'm sure Mitt Romney fully intends to enforce US immigration law, support the state desiring to enforce it, and that will means deporting every illegal alien who is arrested either directly for immigration violations or for committing other crimes during which their illegal status will be exposed and along with their prosecution for other crimes, Romney will be deporting every illegal alien in custody following due process and a speedy deportation hearing. I have no doubt about that.

    What Romney is saying is that he doesn't intend to go door to door searching for illegal aliens and none of us expect him or the federal government to do that.

    When illegal aliens can't work, can't collect welfare, can't drive a car, can't sign up for utilities or buy or rent a house, they will make like trees and leave. Oh yes, they will.
    "A Nation Without Borders Is Not A Nation." Ronald Reagan "SAVE AMERICA, DEPORT CONGRESS." Judy

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •