Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
Like Tree15Likes

Thread: CA. Assembly sends Jerry Brown bill to protect illegal aliens

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

  1. #21

  2. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    8
    Only one problem with the phone call system here in CA - you can't speak! You can only listen to the items on Brown's desk then press 1 or 2 for yes or veto. I am sure someone else has mentioned this but just in case, I'll say it again. What you CAN do is use his contact form on his website. Whether he reads it or even cares what we think are matters of another day. I am not confident he cares at all since he put 2 initiatives to raise taxes to vote on AND wants to spend billions of dollars that California does not have on a bullet train. That train deal is to make his union friends happy. So disgusting!

  3. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    8
    AMEN!

  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    8
    My question is what about the mandate to have auto insurance? Do they still get a driver's license if they do not have proof of insurance? The illegal immigrants here are already driving and, of course, they have no insurance! Since they get paid lower than minimum wage (I would assume most don't), there is NO WAY they can afford insurance in this state. This is true particularly if the driver is male and under the age of 25. Yes, I used to work in the insurance industry. This is a question I ask every time - what about auto insurance?

  5. #25
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    PARADISE (San Diego)
    Posts
    98,164

    California Sheriffs Protest Anti-Secure Communities Bill

    California Sheriffs Protest Anti-Secure Communities Bill
    By Jon Feere, August 28, 2012


    The California legislature has passed a bill designed to shield illegal aliens from law enforcement and it currently sits on Gov. Jerry Brown's desk. The "Trust Act" (AB 1081) would prohibit local law enforcement from complying with federal detention requests except when an illegal alien has been convicted of, or charged with, a "serious" or "violent" felony. The crimes that would be a prerequisite for sending aliens to ICE custody include murder, rape, assault with intent to commit a rape or robbery, kidnapping, carjacking, and a number of other crimes. Many crimes like ID theft or ID fraud get a pass. Consequently, a number of sheriffs are worried that the plan would harm public safety; one sheriff has called on the governor to veto the bill, while another is contemplating defying the act if it becomes law.
    Specifically, the Trust Act reads:
    (a) A law enforcement official has the discretion to detain an individual on the basis of an immigration hold after that individual becomes eligible for release from criminal custody, if both of the following conditions are satisfied:
    (1) The individual has been convicted of a serious or violent felony according to a criminal background check or documentation provided to the law enforcement official by United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement or is currently in custody for a charge of a serious or violent felony by a district attorney.
    (2) The continued detention of the individual on the basis of the immigration hold would not violate any federal, state, or local law, or any local policy.
    (b) If either of the conditions set forth in subdivision (a) is not satisfied, an individual shall not be detained on the basis of an immigration hold after that individual becomes eligible for release from criminal custody.
    The apparent goal of the assembly is to limit state-federal cooperation on immigration and marginalize the successful program known as Secure Communities. The program has taken tens of thousands of illegal aliens off the streets. Not surprisingly a new government report finds that when aliens caught under Secure Communities are released back out onto the streets, public safety suffers: Between October 2008 and July 2011 aliens released because of the Obama administration's prioritization scheme went on to commit 58,000 new crimes. California's Trust Act would likely have the same consequences.

    In response, Riverside County Sheriff Stan Sniff wrote the following to Gov. Brown:
    In the decade after 9/11, and in response to shortfalls in our national Homeland Security, we have honed close partnerships between federal, state, and local enforcement that this [bill] now directly undermines. In addition, law enforcement agencies have executed legal agreements that are directly impacted by this bill, and we potentially place at risk of cancelation or repayment, millions of dollars in federal grant funds of all types where we certify compliance with federal laws. Or worse, we face years of protracted legal disputes, which will waste scarce county funds that are already very constrained. For these reasons, I oppose Assembly Bill 1081 and respectfully request that you veto this measure.
    Meanwhile, the office of Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca has promised it will respect detention requests from federal officials regardless of any impositions created by the Trust Act should it become law. According to Baca's spokesman:
    Our stance is that federal law trumps state law. If it were to move forward, we'd adhere to federal law, so we'd still honor ICE holds.
    Similarly, Sonoma County Sheriff Steve Freitas noted:
    It would make me break either federal or state law. I would have to pick which one to break.
    San Diego County Sheriff William Gore is reportedly ready to join the other sheriffs in ignoring the Trust Act if necessary.

    The bill's lead author, Assemblyman Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco), argues that "California cannot afford to be another Arizona." He claims that the bill "limits unjust and onerous detentions for deportation in local jails of community members who do not pose a threat to public safety." Apparently, the assemblyman believes that millions of instances of ID theft pose no threat to public safety. He also seems to think that the enforcement of immigration laws is only justified in the instance of criminality; he fails to understand that immigration law serves the purpose of protecting national sovereignty and the value of citizenship.

    A number of other goals — like prevention of illegal hiring practices or reducing strain on social and natural resources — are not on the assemblyman's radar.

    This is a great bill for foreigners in the United States illegally who wish to continue engaging in ID theft and a whole host of other crimes. It is a horrible bill for the legal residents of California who want the rule of law to actually mean something. If California's legal residents cannot rely on law enforcement or their state representatives to protect them from lawlessness, does the state's Article 1, Section 1 constitutional declaration of the right of "safety, happiness, and privacy" really exist? And what of the following passage from Article 1, Section 28:
    California's victims of crime are largely dependent upon the proper functioning of government, upon the criminal justice system and upon the expeditious enforcement of the rights of victims of crime described herein, in order to protect the public safety and to secure justice when the public safety has been compromised by criminal activity.
    To the extent that the Trust Act would protect aliens engaged in so-called "non-violent" crimes — which undoubtedly nonetheless compromise public safety — it would appear that the bill cannot be upheld under the state's own constitution.

    California Sheriffs Protest Anti-Secure Communities Bill | Center for Immigration Studies
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


    Sign in and post comments here.

    Please support our fight against illegal immigration by joining ALIPAC's email alerts here https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

  6. #26
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    PARADISE (San Diego)
    Posts
    98,164

    IMMIGRATION: Sheriff urges veto of bill on detainees

    IMMIGRATION: Sheriff urges veto of bill on detainees

    BY DAVID OLSON The Press Enterprise STAFF WRITER
    dolson@pe.com
    Published: 27 August 2012 08:51 PM

    Riverside County Sheriff Stanley Sniff is urging Gov. Jerry Brown to veto a bill that would prevent police from handing over detainees arrested for non-violent crimes to federal immigration officials for possible deportation.

    As Sniff and the California State Sheriffs’ Association pressure Brown for a veto, immigration activists from the Inland area and elsewhere are planning to rally on the state Capitol steps Tuesday, Aug. 28, in support of the legislation.

    Riverside and San Bernardino counties are among more than 3,000 jurisdictions nationwide that share jail detainees’ fingerprints with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. More than 212,000 people have been deported under the program, called Secure Communities, since its inception in 2008.

    But critics point to ICE statistics that show that most illegal immigrants in the Inland area and nationwide who have been deported under Secure Communities did not commit major crimes.

    Sniff said Riverside County cannot ignore the federal government’s requests for fingerprints.

    “This puts the sheriffs in California between a rock and a hard spot,” Sniff said Monday, Aug. 27. “We either have to violate federal law or defy state law.”

    The state Senate last week approved the Trust Act and sent it to Brown’s desk. The governor has not yet decided whether to sign the bill, gubernatorial spokesman Gareth Lacy said.

    Brown supported Secure Communities as attorney general.

    San Bernardino County Sheriff Rod Hoops has not taken a position on the legislation, said sheriff’s department spokeswoman Jodi Miller.
    The state’s Roman Catholic bishops are among the leading supporters of the bill.

    John Andrews, spokesman for the Catholic Diocese of San Bernardino, which includes Riverside and San Bernardino counties, said Secure Communities casts too wide a net, ensnaring people who commit minor crimes.

    Daniel Guzman, legal resources coordinator of the Justice for Immigrants Coalition of Inland Southern California, which includes the diocese, said deporting low-level offenders can lead to higher crime, because undocumented immigrants are less likely to interact with police.

    “We want to make sure immigrants trust the police,” said Guzman, who said he will participate in Tuesday’s Sacramento Trust Act rally.

    Only 21 percent of Inland illegal immigrants deported under Secure Communities since Riverside and San Bernardino counties joined the program in 2010 had been convicted of the most serious felonies, such as murder, rape, child sexual abuse and some categories of theft and burglary, ICE statistics show. Another 15 percent were convicted of less serious felonies, or three or more misdemeanors.

    The rest were found guilty of fewer than three misdemeanors or had no record of a criminal conviction ICE could locate.

    Assemblyman Tim Donnelly, R-Twin Peaks, who represents parts of San Bernardino County, said the bill would make California “a sanctuary state for illegal alien criminals.”

    Donnelly said some misdemeanors, such as driving under the influence, are not minor offenses.

    “This is not about people coming here for a better life or any of that horse crap,” Donnelly said. “This is about whether more Americans will be killed by people who should not be in our communities.”

    Riverside Police Chief Sergio Diaz said even though he wishes that Secure Communities be used in a more “surgical” manner and not lead to the deportation of people who commit the most minor crimes, he sees the Trust Act as overly constraining local law enforcement.

    Chris Newman, legal director of the Los Angeles-based National Day Laborer Organizing Network, which works with day laborers in the Inland area and elsewhere, said by allowing the sharing of fingerprints of those held on “a serious or violent felony,” the bill targets dangerous criminals, not minor offenders.

    “The Trust Act will make sure that people who are threats to public safety will remain behind bars,” Newman said.

    But Sniff said people who commit the most minor offenses are typically not jailed and aren’t fingerprinted. He said Secure Communities does not undermine trust between illegal-immigrant victims and witnesses and police because it only affects detainees.

    Sniff said he wants to wait to see if the bill is signed into law before deciding whether to defy state law — as Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca said he may do — but he said that, in general, federal law trumps state law.

    “To say we don’t have to comply with federal law is absurd,” he said.
    Follow David Olson on Twitter: @DavidOlson11
    Trust act

    Secure Communities: The federal program requires local law-enforcement agencies to allow the fingerprints of all jail detainees to be shared with immigration authorities. That includes those who are arrested but not convicted, and those jailed on minor offenses.

    The Trust Act: The bill, which has passed the state Assembly and Senate, would only allow the sharing of fingerprints of those charged or convicted of “serious or violent felony.”

    IMMIGRATION: Sheriff urges veto of bill on detainees | Breaking News | PE.com - Press-Enterprise
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


    Sign in and post comments here.

    Please support our fight against illegal immigration by joining ALIPAC's email alerts here https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

  7. #27
    Senior Member MontereySherry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    2,370
    Yesterday I had to fill out a California form and I was fingerprinted. I was amazed at the questions on the form. Was I Hispanic or non-Hispanic. Was I a legal immigrant or was I an illegal immigrant. Was I a U.S. citizen. I had to supply my D.L. and proof that I actually lived at the address on the D.L. All the while I was thinking of all the activists and illegal immigrants screaming that this is discrimination. I started thinking of all the times in my life I have had to supply my fingerprints and thought nothing of it. You cannot get a CA I.D. or D.L. without being fingerprinted and I wondered are these Dreamers going to protest that this is profiling.

  8. #28
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    PARADISE (San Diego)
    Posts
    98,164
    California legislature passes bill to ease deportations

    by: Marilyn Bechtel
    Home » peoplesworld
    August 28 2012

    As California's legislative session races to the finish line this week, three bills to ease restrictions on the state's undocumented immigrants are making headlines.

    The TRUST Act, AB 1081, introduced by Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco, has already passed both legislative houses. Governor Jerry Brown has not yet indicated whether he will sign it.

    AB 1081 would lower the level of California's cooperation with the federal Secure Communities (S-COMM) program. Under it, California law enforcement agencies would only honor Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) requests to hold detainees who had been convicted of felonies or other serious crimes.

    Observers say this would return S-COMM to its original stated goal of dealing with violent and serious criminal immigrants.

    Now, when law enforcement agencies in the state share fingerprints of arrestees with ICE and ICE finds a match, it asks the agencies to hold the immigrant, supposedly for two days but often much longer.

    The Los Angeles Sheriff's Department recently found that immigrants held after an ICE request stayed in custody about 20 days longer than they otherwise would have, costing the county over $26 million annually.

    Since the S-COMM program started in 2009, over 75,000 people have been deported from California; nearly 70 percent had no or only minor criminal convictions.

    AB 1081 passed both legislative houses on partisan lines, with some members of each party abstaining.

    The TRUST Act is supported by the state's Catholic bishops, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, Santa Clara County's sheriff, and Oakland and Palo Alto police chiefs. LA County Sheriff Lee Baca and other California sheriffs threaten to defy it.

    The issue hit the news cycle earlier in the summer when Juana Reyes-Hernandez was picked up by police as she sold home-made tamales in a Sacramento Walmart parking lot despite warnings about trespassing. The single mother of two, in the U.S. for 15 years with no criminal record, was jailed for nearly two weeks, and her children were put into foster care.

    Reyes no longer faces deportation, after the trespass charge was dismissed and an immigration judge closed her case.

    Speaking on radio station KPFA Aug. 27, Ammiano referred to Reyes' situation, saying "we're asking the ICE agents to distinguish between someone like her and some of the more serious gang members, people who do have felonies on the record." He called the matter both a fiscal issue and a "moral imperative to watch out for the people in our state" who contribute greatly to its economy.

    Two other immigrant rights measures were introduced into the legislature at the last minute, late last week. Each would have to pass both legislative houses by Aug. 31 to move to the governor's desk for signature.

    One, by state Senator Gilbert Cedillo, D-Los Angeles, would let young undocumented "DREAMers" eligible for President Obama's deferred action program apply for driver's licenses. Under AB 2189 applicants could present any federal document they receive under the federal program as proof of legal presence for the purpose of applying for a driver's license.

    Cedillo has worked for years to reinstate undocumented immigrants' eligibility for California driver's licenses, banned by law in 1993.

    The other, the "Safe Harbor" bill, by Assemblyman Felipe Fuentes, D-Sylmar, would create a five-year pilot program to allow undocumented immigrants who pay state taxes to receive state protection from federal immigration enforcement. Supporters say the measure would net the state some $325 million in revenue. For the program to take effect, federal authorities would have to agree to place the immigrants in the lowest category of enforcement.
    Photo: Marilyn Bechtel/PW

    California legislature passes bill to ease deportations » peoplesworld

    Other sites in the People Before Profit network:



    www.peoplesworld.org
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


    Sign in and post comments here.

    Please support our fight against illegal immigration by joining ALIPAC's email alerts here https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

  9. #29
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    PARADISE (San Diego)
    Posts
    98,164
    Newmexican likes this.
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


    Sign in and post comments here.

    Please support our fight against illegal immigration by joining ALIPAC's email alerts here https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •