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  1. #1
    Senior Member FedUpinFarmersBranch's Avatar
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    CA-SOBOakland group help clear confusing path to citizenship

    Oakland group help clear confusing path to citizenship
    By Angela Woodall
    Oakland Tribune
    Article Last Updated: 07/26/2008 05:02:56 PM PDT


    OAKLAND — At age 83, Jose Barocio is ready to become a U.S. citizen. So is his wife, Maria Barocio, a sprightly 76-year-old.

    They have been legal residents for about 15 years, since leaving their small town in the Mexican state of Michoacán where Jose was a farmer.

    Neither of them, however, can read or write. So they sought help Saturday at a citizenship fair in the Fruitvale Village, where volunteers walked immigrants like the Barocios through the intricacies of U.S. citizenship.

    "We are old but we want to be able to vote for a good president who will make the future of our grandchildren better," Jose Barocio said.

    The couple will need help every step of the way

    This is the second such fair hosted by the Unity Council, a advocacy group for low-income Latinos.

    "It is important to give immigrants a voice, which means the right to vote," Leyda Leyva, a Unity Council coordinator. But misinformation, lack of money — at least $685 — and fear hold people back, Leyva said.

    "They don't think they qualify, so they don't bother applying."

    Grant Smith, an immigrant from Vancouver, Canada, said he wanted to decipher the legalities of citizenship and figure out whether he could afford it financially. "Permanent residency has worked fine so far," said Smith, who was wearing a T-shirt with the logo "Enjoy California."

    Juan Franco sought assistance because immigration officials mixed up

    his last name when he applied for residency a decade ago — a frequent problem because Latinos use both their mother's maiden and father's names.

    Most participants who choose the citizenship route will be ready to mail their paperwork to the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services after they are finished.

    But Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Oakland, said even citizens can get caught up in the net of federal policies she said are being inconsistently and inappropriately enforced to crack down on illegal immigration.

    In May, agents from the immigration enforcement branch of the Department of Homeland Security arrested a Latino family of four at a Berkeley home and a woman at her Oakland residence. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement raids provoked confusion and fear among residents, especially because ICE agents were seen in the area of an East Oakland school. Agents have rounded up hundreds of non-U.S. citizens since May in raids around the country.

    Lee said ICE assistant secretary Julie Myers told her Friday that the agency would develop consistent immigration regulations that would exclude schools, churches and other public spaces such as playgrounds. That, according to media reports, is the unofficial policy of the department.

    ICE has to enforce immigration policies when they have a specific cause, Lee said. "But they can't conduct witch hunts that intimidate and harass communities."

    Staff writer Angela Woodall can be reached at awoodall@bayareanewsgroup.com or at 510-208-6413.



    http://www.insidebayarea.com/news/ci_10008091
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  2. #2
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    Wonderful! New citizenship applicants can't read or write! Will they be eligible for Medicare, Medicaid, food stamps? Perhaps they are eligible for a pension. Years ago on 60 Minutes there was a report about how many of the aged from Asian countries come here to retire, because we have wonderful public assistance for the indigent, legal or not.
    Seems we are slowly going to hell in a hand basket with all these free for all policies. Is there no thought we are going to run out of resources (like water) because of this influx of legals and illegals?
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    At age 83, Jose Barocio is ready to become a U.S. citizen. So is his wife, Maria Barocio, a sprightly 76-year-old.

    They have been legal residents for about 15 years, since leaving their small town in the Mexican state of Michoacán where Jose was a farmer.

    Neither of them, however, can read or write. So they sought help Saturday at a citizenship fair in the Fruitvale Village, where volunteers walked immigrants like the Barocios through the intricacies of U.S. citizenship.
    I always assumed permanent resident wishing to become naturalized U.S. Citizens were required a basic knowledge of English. Hmmm.........guess I was wrong.

    Excerpt:

    English and U.S. civics tests

    Most applicants must be able to speak, read, and write basic English, as well as demonstrate basic knowledge of U.S. history and government. People who are over 50 and who have been a permanent resident for 20 years or more, or who are over 55 and have been a permanent resident for 15 years, may take the examination in whatever language they choose. All other applicants must read, write, and speak basic English. People with physical or developmental disabilities or mental impairment may apply for a waiver of the test requirements.
    http://aboutvisas.com/citizenship.html

    IMHO, folks who become permanent residents should be given a deadline for becoming a U.S. Citizen (let's say 10 years). The law makes them eligible for application after 5 years as a permanent resident, so another 5 years should be adequate. Should they fail to meet that deadline, they should become deportable. Let's hold their feet to the fire and make sure they assimilate within a reasonable time. Personally, I think 10 years is plenty of time to learn civics and how to speak and write basic English. I'm sick of hearing the many stories about legal immigrants spending 10, 15, and 20 years here without learning a lick of English. These folks need to be forced to assimilate (within a resonable time) or go home.

    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" ** Edmund Burke**

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  4. #4
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    At age 83, Jose Barocio is ready to become a U.S. citizen. So is his wife, Maria Barocio, a sprightly 76-year-old.

    They have been legal residents for about 15 years, since leaving their small town in the Mexican state of Michoacán where Jose was a farmer.

    Neither of them, however, can read or write. So they sought help Saturday at a citizenship fair in the Fruitvale Village, where volunteers walked immigrants like the Barocios through the intricacies of U.S. citizenship.
    You know...How did these people get into this country to begin with. No offense, but they cannot read and write. How in the world did they support themselves? Did they have a sponsor? Have they been here on some sort of Agricultural Visa?

    I just don't understand this.
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  5. #5

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    "We are old but we want to be able to vote for a good president who will make the future of our grandchildren better," Jose Barocio said.
    This is total BS they are just in time to collect thier benes,and shouldnt they be voting to make thier grand kids life better in mexico.

    They just can't give our country away fast enough to make them happy.

    Some day the American people are gonna wake up and wonder what happened to our country.

    Warning to all Americans get off your lazy chair and start paying attention to what these traitors are doing to your kids and grand kids future.
    We can't deport them all ? Just think of the fun we could have trying!

  6. #6
    Senior Member SeaTurtle's Avatar
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    Juan Franco sought assistance because immigration officials mixed up

    his last name when he applied for residency a decade ago — a frequent problem because Latinos use both their mother's maiden and father's names.
    Well, a simple solution would be for MALDEF and La Racists to encourage the "latinos" to AMERICANIZE their names, like millions o fItalian, Irish, etc immigrants have done for over a hundred years.

    The flag flies at half-mast out of grief for the death of my beautiful, formerly-free America. May God have mercy on your souls.
    RIP USA 7/4/1776 - 11/04/2008

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