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  1. #1
    Administrator Jean's Avatar
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    Failure to enforce deportations an affront to immigration le

    By Mark H. Metcalf
    September 27, 2010
    Failure to enforce deportations an affront to immigration

    In its annual report for 2008, the Department of Homeland Security revealed 558,000 fugitive aliens — those who fled court or disobeyed orders to leave — had avoided removal. Under the Obama administration, this number has grown. Some 715,000 people now reside in the U.S. that DHS refuses to deport. In one year, unenforced deportation orders have climbed 28 percent. And the numbers keep climbing.

    “[M]illions of illegal immigrants,
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    This article is spot on. Especially the part where he mentions that DHS officials "inaccurately report their work". A huge factor for the Border Patrol is maintaining certain "levels" of activity in their zones. Levels are raised due to increased apprehensions. So obviously, the goal is to have less apprehensions. In order to avoid the raising of the level of certain zones, agents are told directly to "turn the aliens back south" into Mexico by supervisors instead of arresting them. The aliens then just keep trying until they eventually get in. Even if they are caught, they are usually just sent back to Mexico within a few hours. No wonder they never stop coming.

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