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  1. #1
    Senior Member MyAmerica's Avatar
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    Mexico Says No to U.S. Anti-Drug Initiative

    Mexico Says No to U.S. Anti-Drug Initiative
    La Opinión, Posted: Jun 05, 2008

    MEXICO CITY -- Mexico has refused a new U.S. plan to fight drug trafficking, reports Spanish-language newspaper La Opinión. The Merida Initiative is a multi-year plan to give Mexico $350 million and Central America $100 million, but requires that the Mexican government eliminate corruption in the military and police, and stop human rights violations. Juan Camilo Mouriño, Mexico's minister of the interior, called the initiative unacceptable because it is "unilateral and therefore counterproductive". Mouriño added that the Mexican government is making an effort to improve bilateral cooperation in efforts to combat international organized crime and drug trafficking.

    http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/vi ... 4c529f7385
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  2. #2
    Senior Member USA_born's Avatar
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    We expected this. Mexico wants to be showered with money but with no questions asked. Congress got this one right.

  3. #3
    Senior Member miguelina's Avatar
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    Re: Mexico Says No to U.S. Anti-Drug Initiative

    Quote Originally Posted by MyAmerica
    Mexico Says No to U.S. Anti-Drug Initiative
    La Opinión, Posted: Jun 05, 2008

    MEXICO CITY -- Mexico has refused a new U.S. plan to fight drug trafficking, reports Spanish-language newspaper La Opinión. The Merida Initiative is a multi-year plan to give Mexico $350 million and Central America $100 million, but requires that the Mexican government eliminate corruption in the military and police, and stop human rights violations. Juan Camilo Mouriño, Mexico's minister of the interior, called the initiative unacceptable because it is "unilateral and therefore counterproductive". Mouriño added that the Mexican government is making an effort to improve bilateral cooperation in efforts to combat international organized crime and drug trafficking.

    http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/vi ... 4c529f7385
    Good, they should not get another dime from us, we've got enough of their citizens living here illegally as it is!

    Just so I understand correctly, Mexico has no intention in eliminating corruption in the military and the police or stopping human rights abuses? OK, they have the right, but NOT with OUR money. How do they propose to fight the drug traffickers with corrupt military and police? HOW will that money be used? Sorry Mexico, the days of not accounting for our money are loooong gone!

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  4. #4
    Senior Member MyAmerica's Avatar
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    U.S. finalizing aid for Mexico's drug war

    (This was reported earlier from the U.S. viewpoint. Has a couple interesting statements concerning the aid package.)

    U.S. finalizing aid for Mexico's drug war

    But Mexican concerns about the plan's human rights conditions could scuttle it.
    By Howard LaFranchi | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor
    from the June 6, 2008 edition

    Washington - Congress is poised to approve a multibillion-dollar antinarcotics-assistance program for Mexico – but with human rights conditions attached that could ultimately lead the Mexican government to reject the whole package.

    The House and Senate this week began the process of reconciling their two versions of a White House plan to provide $1.4 billion over three years in military hardware, surveillance equipment, training, and judicial assistance to further Mexico's intensifying war with its notorious drug cartels. The proposal also includes antidrug funding for some Central American countries, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti.

    Both houses trimmed the White House request a bit, though leaving it largely intact while adding human rights conditions – such as a Senate insistence on civilian judicial oversight of cases of abuse perpetrated by the military.

    Yet while human rights and judicial-transparency advocates say that the strings Congress has so far attached are the bare minimum for such a large new commitment, some Mexican officials are suggesting their country might prefer to continue a violent war alone rather than accept American conditions.

    The brouhaha is conjuring up Mexico's long-held sensitivities over US intervention and interference in what it considers its sovereign affairs.

    But many experts say Mexico could not have been surprised by what are by now typical conditions for such aid programs.

    "The Mexican government can't expect a major military program is going to be approved without some kind of human rights conditions on it," says Lisa Haugaard, executive director of the Latin America Working Group, a policy advocate organization based in Washington.

    Defending the conditions during Senate debate of the program, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D) of Vermont quipped that the new assistance – a more-than fivefold increase in aid to Mexico – is "a partnership, not a giveaway."

    But Mexico's interior secretary, Juan Camilo Mourino, this week said that the conditions were "unacceptable." The White House, meanwhile, sided with the government of Mexican President Felipe Calderón: White House drug czar John Walters on Tuesday accused Congress of "sabotaging" the counternarcotics initiative, saying that it was "misguided" to "ask another country in order to be a partner to do things that are unconstitutional in a democratic regime."

    The congressional conditions are also causing the southern neighbors to jab back. In a recent radio interview, the man in charge of Mexico's war with the drug lords, deputy attorney general José Luis Santiago Vasconcelos, quipped that both countries might be better off if the United States kept its money and used it to stem the flow south across the border of the high-powered weapons that the gangs prefer.

    No one is questioning that Mexico is fighting the drug cartels – which transport 90 percent of the cocaine consumed in the US – with new zeal. President Calderón has assigned 25,000 soldiers and police to fighting the gangs, which in many cases are better armed (and remunerated) than their government counterparts.

    As of May, more than 1,400 deaths had been tallied in Mexico's drug war this year – about a 50 percent hike over last year, according to Mexico's attorney general.

    It was this newfound Mexican dedication to fighting the cartels that led President Bush to unveil the new aid package with Calderón last year in the Mexican city of Mérida – an act that prompted the White House to call the assistance the "Mérida initiative."

    But some Latin America and human rights experts dubbed the huge new package, with its emphasis on military hardware like helicopters, "Plan Mexico" – in reference to the decade-old, multibillion-dollar "Plan Colombia" initiated under President Clinton. That nickname rubbed Mexico the wrong way.

    It was inevitable, some analysts say, that Mexico's historical preoccupation with US interference would arise with a US assistance package of this magnitude, says Adam Isaacson, director of programs at the Center for International Policy in Washington.

    Still, Mr. Isaacson believes that in the end, the aid package will be approved – and accepted by Mexico – for two reasons. First, Mexico needs the modernized equipment and training that the package offers, he says.

    But the money, he says, also allows the US to do something about the destabilizing violence next door without really taking on the causes of that violence at home. Isaacson says, "It's almost like, rather than taking on some powerful constituencies here, it's easier to offer a grab bag of assistance for the Mexicans to deal with the problem over there."

    http://www.csmonitor.com/2008/0606/p02s02-usfp.html
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  5. #5
    Senior Member MyAmerica's Avatar
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    IMO Mexico is playing a game. They want the money, technology and equipment but under their terms-- they are attempting to to get all conditions removed.
    Some feel the Mexican government is losing the drug war and this may be a way of 'saving face' and an excuse to recall the army.

    Reminds me of an abusive spouse who destroys a gift from the battered person because 'it wasn't good enough'.

    Think there will be an increase in violence and more reporting to make the U.S. feel 'guilty'. Mexico also appealed to the World Court over the execution of 5 Mexican citizens that are pending in the U.S. IMO Mexico wants to 'embarass' the U.S. in front of the world.

    Posted by FedUpinFarmersBranch: Mexico asks World Court to stay executions in US
    http://www.alipac.us/ftopict-118226.html

    Mexico does not respect our sovereign borders as evidenced by the influx of illegal aliens and failure to assist our border agents when they are attacked.

    Bush had better cancel the recall of the National Guard on the border and arm them.
    "Distrust and caution are the parents of security."
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  6. #6
    Senior Member redpony353's Avatar
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    USE THE MONEY TO BUILD THE FENCE AND INCREASE BORDER PATROL. THATS A TON OF MONEY. LETS USE IT TO CREATE A BARRIER. LET MEXICO ROT IN THEIR CORRUPTION.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member tencz57's Avatar
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    Built the Fence Now ! Keep Cartels and Illegals out !
    Nam vet 1967/1970 Skull & Bones can KMA .Bless our Brothers that gave their all ..It also gives me the right to Vote for Chuck Baldwin 2008 POTUS . NOW or never*
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    AE
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    The brouhaha is conjuring up Mexico's long-held sensitivities over US intervention and interference in what it considers its sovereign affairs.
    Yet they have NO problem trying to interefere with our sovereignty. Ah, this is the corruption that is Mexican thinking.

    Yes, they wanted the American dollars, but on their terms, that is the way they are as illegals as we all have seen. The apple does not fall far from the tree.
    “In the beginning of a change, the Patriot is a scarce man, Brave, Hated, and Scorned. When his cause succeeds however,the timid join him, For then it costs nothing to be a Patriot.

  9. #9
    Senior Member agrneydgrl's Avatar
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    They don't want us in their affairs, but they think nothing of interferring in our soveriegn affairs. We should ship that money to OUR border patrol and border towns.

  10. #10
    Senior Member LadyStClaire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyAmerica
    IMO Mexico is playing a game. They want the money, technology and equipment but under their terms-- they are attempting to to get all conditions removed.
    Some feel the Mexican government is losing the drug war and this may be a way of 'saving face' and an excuse to recall the army.

    Reminds me of an abusive spouse who destroys a gift from the battered person because 'it wasn't good enough'.

    Think there will be an increase in violence and more reporting to make the U.S. feel 'guilty'. Mexico also appealed to the World Court over the execution of 5 Mexican citizens that are pending in the U.S. IMO Mexico wants to 'embarass' the U.S. in front of the world.

    Posted by FedUpinFarmersBranch: Mexico asks World Court to stay executions in US
    http://www.alipac.us/ftopict-118226.html

    Mexico does not respect our sovereign borders as evidenced by the influx of illegal aliens and failure to assist our border agents when they are attacked.

    Bush had better cancel the recall of the National Guard on the border and arm them.
    IT APPEARS THAT MEXICO WANTS TO HAVE ITS CAKE AND EAT IT TOO. AND AS FAR AS MEXICO APPEALING TO THE WORLD COURT OVER THE EXECUTIONS OF 5 MEXICAN CITIZENS, THEY CANNOT INTERFERE IN THE COURT OF LAW IN ANY OF THE 50 STATES CAN THEY? IMO THEY HAVE NO RIGHT TO INTERFERE!

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