Page 103 of 826 FirstFirst ... 3539399100101102103104105106107113153203603 ... LastLast
Results 1,021 to 1,030 of 8260
Like Tree204Likes

Thread: BASIC LIST / SUGGESTED ITEMS FOR LONG TERM SURVIVAL

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 5 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 5 guests)

  1. #1021
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696


    SHTF Survival: 7 Vitamins That Help Prevent Dental Emergencies


    We tend to neglect the dental aspects of emergency preparedness. True dental health comes from within your body and teeth via your nutrition levels and enamel hardness comes from the nutrients in your diet.

    It’s no surprise that the more vitamins and minerals that your body is able to absorb, the healthier you will stay. Maintaining a proper diet that is rich in high protein meats, grains and a combination of fruits and vegetables benifits your overall health.

    If a long-term emergency were to occur where your daily vitamin intake suddenly decreases, or you fail to properly care for your teeth because of lack of dental supplies, then your overall health, as well as your teeth may suffer and degrade. As a result, teeth could abscess and cause bacterial infections that can cause serious health conditions. Many preparedness-centered individuals are trying to curb this type of emergency by storing vitamins. Taking vitamins during a long-term emergency will assist in regulating body functions, continued mental alertness, assist in maintaining good eye sight, as well as keep teeth and gums healthy. However, they will do you no good if you do not take them regularly. Some vitamins and minerals to consider for long-term preparedness are:

    General Multivitamin: This basic multivitamin will provide your body is it’s basic daily vitamin and minerals. Buying the multivitamin for mature adults will give a person increased levels of certain needed minerals that may further improve health.

    Vitamin A: Vitamin A is responsible for maintaining healthy gums. Without it, gum infections do not heal as fast and calculus tends to form more quickly under the gums. Lack of vitamin A is also associated with adnormal bone and tooth formation.

    B Complex Vitamins: These are also a big player in fighting gum disease. B vitamin deficiencies can make gingivitis more severe and cause sores in the gums, tongue and other soft tissues in the mouth.

    Vitamin C: Without it your gums become more vulnerable to infection, bleeding, and gum disease. A vitamin C deficiency makes whatever gum issues problem you have much worse. If you have periodontal disease, a lack of vitamin C increases bleeding and swelling and accelerates destructive effects. Studies have revealed that people who consume less of Vitamin C tend to be 25% more likely to suffer from gum disease.

    Vitamin D: This vitamin not only strengthens your immunity against disease, but it also absorbs calcium that is needed for healthy teeth and also assists in keeping the teeth anchored into their sockets. Vitamin D has been shown to reduce gingivitis because of the anti- inflammatory effects of the vitamin.

    Calcium: 99% of the calcium in your body is in your bones and your teeth. Dietary calcium is needed to make sure they’re in good shape. It is important to understand that the calcium that is present in bones and teeth is constantly in a state of movement. The calcium gets reabsorbed into the bloodstream if levels are low, and it is put back into bones and teeth when levels are higher. This is why Vitamin D is so important because it regulates this entire mechanism. People with low intake of Calcium and vitamin C are more likely to suffer from periodontal disease. Children’s teeth need Calcium to develop properly.

    Phosphorus: Calcium alone cannot take all the credit for proper teeth formation. In fact, about 85% of phosphorus in the body can be found in bones and teeth. It has been found that vitamin D compliments this mineral by boosting it’s effectiveness.

    Storing Vitamins

    Vitamins tend to expire after a year. However, there has been contradicting information regarding taking medicines and vitamins after the expiration dates have passed. Since the expiration date is probably conservative to ensure full potency, and aimed at the manufacturer and store more than the consumer, taking vitamins passed their expiration date will not put a person in danger. However, the potency of the vitamin may come into question if a person takes it passed their expiration date.

    Keeping vitamins in a cool, dark area of the home will ensure they their potency for as long as possible. Over time, vitamins will gradually oxidize, and become less effective. It happens faster if the environment you keep them in is humid (e.g. your kitchen or your bathroom).

    In Summary

    Health experts are coming to the conclusion that there is a correlation between vitamins and dental health. Stocking up on vitamins to enhance your overall health and assist in maintaining teeth and preventing dental-related diseases would be a proactive way to prepare for a long-term emergency.

    Published by Tess Pennington on July 5th, 2011

    http://readynutrition.com/resources/sht ... _05072011/
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:10 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  2. #1022
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:11 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  3. #1023
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:11 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  4. #1024
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    Plague of Rising Costs: Boost Crop Production or No Food at Any Price

    Mac Slavo
    July 6th, 2011
    SHTFplan.com
    5 Comments



    We could argue that one of the main reasons for rising food prices is out-of-control monetary easing by central banks around the world, namely our own Federal Reserve. While there are short term ups and downs in prices, for example the crash in commodity prices in 2008 and their subsequent meteoric rise to the present, the long-term trend since the establishment of The Fed has led to ever increasing prices.

    The other critical reason for why food prices are rising boils down to supply and demand – and the consequences of not dealing with these issues could be much worse then the adverse effects of monetary intervention. With billions of people on the planet, and many in China and India now becoming part of a growing global ‘middle class,’ demand for commodities will no doubt continue to increase. We’ve already begun to see oil price rises as a result of the industrial demand from China, and food will experience a similar effect. We simply cannot and should not underestimate the strain that over six billion people put on food production, as evidenced by recent supply issues with corn:
    The global agriculture supply situation has worsened and a failure to boost food production fast enough to meet demand may lead to shortages, said investor Jim Rogers, chairman of Rogers Holdings.“We’ve got to do something or we’re going to have no food at any price at times in the next few years,” Rogers said in a Bloomberg Television interview with Rishaad Salamat in Singapore. “I still own agriculture. If I found something to buy, I would buy it.”

    Rogers joins former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, the UN Food & Agriculture Organization and the World Bank, in highlighting the need to boost global food production and address issues pushing prices higher. Group of 20 farm ministers agreed last week to increase agriculture output, set up a crop database and limit export bans to tackle what French President Nicolas Sarkozy calls the “plague” of rising food prices.

    Monthly food prices tracked by the FAO have surged nine times in the past 11 months

    Global stockpiles of corn, the most-consumed grain, are forecast to drop to 47 days of use, the fewest since 1974, data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show. Inventories are declining as demand continues to outstrip production that’s forecast to rise to a fifth consecutive year of record.


    Inventories of wheat, used in making pasta, noodles, bread and feed for hogs and poultry, will drop to a three-year low of 184.26 million metric tons before next year’s Northern Hemisphere harvest, as output misses demand for a second year, the USDA said.

    Unless governments come together to successfully address the issue of food security, “hopes for wider international cooperation looked doomed,” Annan, who served as UN Secretary General from 1996 to 2007, said last week.

    “We have serious problems in inventories” of farm products, Rogers said.

    Source: Money News
    It wouldn’t take much to make it difficult to acquire food at any price. A long enough drought, flooding, or crop failures resulting from disease could seriously hamper the globe’s food distribution networks. The entire planet has 47 days of corn on hand. There are, of course, other commodities available as well, but any sort of far-from-equilibrium event could make it difficult to not only produce, but also deliver those goods to consumers.

    For years we’ve enjoyed the ability to head down to our local grocery stores at any hour of the day and stock up on whatever foods meet our fancy. But what if, from one day to the next, that came to an abrupt stop? A perfect storm of hyperinflationary price rises, production problems and international payment settlement issues (in the event of a currency meltdown, for example) could mean that you and your family won’t have access to staple foods.

    It’s a scary proposition for those who have not taken the time to put some reserve food aside.

    In January of 2010 we advised our readers to Buy Commodities at Today’s Lower Prices, Consume at Tomorrow’s Higher Prices. Financially, this has been an effective strategy and has paid off well for those who began acquiring and properly storing long term food supplies 18 months ago.

    More important than the financial benefits of such a strategy, however, are the emotional and physical health aspects. Emotionally, it feels good to know that you have more than the 47 days of reserves available to you then the rest of the world. The stress of even considering the possibility that you may not be able to put food in your kids’ mouths is one that leads to significant anxiety, frustration, anger or worse. Thus, for those who have realized the dangers of depending on just-in-time food delivery systems to feed their families and have taken steps to ensure food will be available even if production and delivery systems collapse, the emotional benefits far outweigh any financial savings you may have gained by buying food before prices went parabolic.
    Stocking up on long-term dry goods, such as these 11 emergency foods that can last a lifetime, is as good a strategy today as it was in early 2010. Prices will, in the long-term, continue to rise for a number of reasons, one of which is the real possibility that demand for food globally will not satisfy the production capabilities of our farming and ranching infrastructures.

    The most alarming aspect of all this is that 99% of our population has no idea how fragile our food production systems are, nor do they care to know. While the 47 days of corn reserves mentioned above should be of concern, what’s even more troubling is that the average American family has enough food in the pantry for about three to four days of consumption. It’s a recipe for disaster if you ask us.

    Hat tip Survival Blog

    http://www.shtfplan.com/emergency-pr...80%99_07062011
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:13 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  5. #1025
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    Learn A Thing Or Two From Survival Shows

    June 13, 2011 by David Morris


    DSC.DISCOVERY.COM/TV/MAN-WOMAN-WILD

    In an episode of Man, Woman, Wild, Ruth England and Mykel Hawke struggle through an Amazonian tributary on a makeshift raft, with two primitive paddles, as they try to find their way to some form of civilization.

    This week, we’re going to take a break and have some fun. Specifically, we’re going to talk about TV shows that actually might have survival lessons included. In recent years, there have been several survival shows that have come onto the market, and it looks like several of them are going to be regular features.

    Now, don’t think that watching a survival TV show for 42 minutes a week is going to make you a survivalist. That’s about as ridiculous as thinking that watching UFC fights is going to make you a fighter. They are both entertaining, and you will probably learn some new skills and tactics, but you really need to practice the skills to become proficient.

    So, let me go over some of the survivor shows that are on TV. I’ll tell you what they cover and whether my wife and I consider them being worth the time to watch to help you get more prepared for surviving disasters.

    I’ll start with the better-known ones, but the better shows are actually at the end of the list.

    Survivor on CBS: This series is one of the grandfathers of reality survival TV, and I’m thankful for it because of that. But there are few, if any, survival lessons to be learned from it. There have been some interesting political and human-interaction lessons from it; but for the most part, it’s become a glorified soap opera. Even though the series has a great name, we don’t watch it.

    Survivorman on Discovery Channel: This series ran in 2004, 2007 and 2008 and featured Les Stroud in the wilderness facing various survival situations without support. In fact, he carried all of his own camera equipment. The shows emphasized focus on the basics and how little time there is to focus on anything other than the basics in a survival situation. I don’t know Stroud, but we have a common acquaintance. He’s the real deal. He’s not superman, but he is willing to stake his survival on how well he performs in survival situations. I’m not a fan of his new series, but I do still watch Survivorman repeats occasionally.

    Man vs. Wild on Discovery Channel: This is a very entertaining survival show and there are usually one or two good tips or tactics in each episode. Bear Grylls knows his stuff, but he is supported by a crew. And in order to make things more interesting, he takes a lot of risks that are unnecessary in a true solo survival situation. It does make good TV, but you really need to keep in mind the fact that a lot of Grylls’ stunts would be foolish to do without a support crew standing by to pick up the pieces.

    Worst-Case Scenario on Discovery Channel: These are also very entertaining and well-filmed survival shows. Bear Grylls is the main expert in this one as well. The episodes I watched were primarily entertainment, but there were some good points. Grylls was one of the first survival experts to do shows on survival strategies in urban environments, and most of this series is set in urban areas. I disagree with his willingness to take unnecessary risks and his approach on self-defense — especially his emphasis on techniques that take a lot of skill and practice to use successfully. But, like in Man vs. Wild, it does make good TV.

    Out Of the Wild on Discovery Channel: The first season ran in 2009 and followed several small groups of people surviving in the Alaskan wilderness. This series emphasized just how much effort it can take to simply cover your most basic needs in a survival situation. It clearly showed how important attitude, fire, shelter, water, food and sleep are. I don’t think you can appreciate how hungry, thirsty and tired you can get until you’ve gone a day or two in a survival situation without a good meal or clean water, but this series showed how various people break down in survival situations. I really enjoyed this series. There aren’t very many hard skills taught, but the human interaction and psychological lessons make it worth watching.

    The second season, which was filmed in Venezuela, was a great look into how starvation, dehydration and exhaustion can wipe out people, place group dynamics under stress and dramatically change a person’s psychology in a matter of days. I really liked this series and strongly recommend catching a rerun or buying the DVD.

    Dual Survival on Discovery Channel: This series is currently running again on Discovery. I originally recorded it because of my appreciation of Cody Lundin. I kept watching because of the vastly different approaches Lundin and Dave Canterbury take to wilderness-survival situations. Every episode follows the same script, much like real wilderness survival: Figure out shelter, fire, water, food and navigation, and get out. The neat part about this is that Lundin is a self-reliant, shoeless hippie and Canterbury is a former U.S. Army sniper/scout. In every challenge they face, I find myself relating to one or the other of their approaches.

    Man, Woman, Wild on Discovery Channel: This is one of our favorite survival shows simply because there is a woman on the show whom my wife can relate to. In the show, Special Forces survival expert Mykel Hawke and his wife Ruth England take on various wilderness-survival scenarios starting with only knives and clothes. There are some how-to components to the show, but it mostly highlights the dynamics of two people being in a survival situation with only one of the two being a survival expert. And I can’t emphasize this enough: My wife likes this show way more than the all-man survival shows.

    The Colony on Discovery Channel: This is urban-survival reality TV. The premise for season one was that a pandemic killed off the majority of the population and a mismatched group of people found each other and decided to work together. There were some bad pieces of advice — for example, using a bank of car batteries to power appliances — but it was a great series with at least a half-dozen solid urban survival lessons in each episode. Season two was a combination of a few good lessons and a lot of hair-pulling. That being said, it is a great tool to use to come up with scenarios to contemplate — especially figuring out how you would deal with being forced to survive with people who have very different skill and motivation levels.

    MidwayUSA’s The Best Defense: Survival! on Outdoor Channel: This top-notch series was developed by three friends of mine: Michael Bane, Mike Janich and Rob Pincus. We have been trying to figure out how to best tie in my SurviveInPlace.com Urban Survival Course with this series. Hopefully, we will get it figured out in time for the season three launch in early 2012. This series is all meat and how-to. The Outdoor Channel let Bane, Janich and Pincus take off the gloves for season two, and they knocked it out of the park. They covered survival rooms, food, water, medical, bugging out, surviving in place and more.

    The important thing about all of these shows is that the skills they teach are next to useless until you take ownership of them, practice them and make them your own. There are occasional stories about how people survive disasters by doing something that they saw on TV, but the reason those stories make the news is because they are so rare. Someone who learns skills, practices them and successfully applies them under stress is normal and not newsworthy.

    Do you have any favorite survival or preparedness TV shows or movies you like? Do you have any thoughts on the series I mentioned? When you watch a show that demonstrates survival skills, do you go out and practice it afterword? Share your thoughts by commenting below.

    http://www.personalliberty.com/survi...urvival-shows/
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:15 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  6. #1026
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    The Colony - The Experiment Begins http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Hv4ADUr-0E



    The Colony - Creating Electricity http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sclWPC_D ... ure=relmfu



    The Colony - When Gas Runs Out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkH6mFlf ... ure=relmfu



    The Colony - Generator Renewed
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJM7S2tr ... ature=fvwp

    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:18 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  7. #1027
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:21 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  8. #1028
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:23 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  9. #1029
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    Not all of the videos are posted on line
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 10:23 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  10. #1030
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    The Colony - Season 2 Episode 1 - A New Beginning - Part 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yhF4IBnJUas



    The Colony Season 2 Episode 1 A New Beginning Part 2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tgVH4eYuZY



    The Colony - Season 2 Episode 1 - A New Beginning - Part 3
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XI5z7EiT6Hk



    The Colony - Season 2 Episode 1 - A New Beginning - Part 4
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FfGz8YprBg

    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-31-2012 at 05:59 AM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •