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  1. #21
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    Listening to LAPD scanner...city on tac alert.. Rampart division..

    Been listening for the last 2 hours...mostly hispanic perps...hmmm
    Detect, Detain, and Deport - The 3-D method of choice!!

  2. #22
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    Confirmed - FOX National did run story.

    Confirmed - FOX National did run story.
    it ran during the 6:00pm show - Sheppard Smith?? Brett Baer??

    Highlights -
    there were a dozen or so protestors the first night.
    there were hundreds last night...
    and they're ramping up for (more) hundreds again tonight (bussing them in?)

    the perp was reportedly drunk.
    there was blood found on the knife he carried, and that is now being investigated.
    they showed his picture and gave his name.

    and there are Consulate Members from 3 countries coming to try to hold off any more violence.
    AirForceGal This nation will remain the land of the free only so long as it is the home of the brave. ~Elmer Davis

  3. #23
    Senior Member ShockedinCalifornia's Avatar
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    LA police move to quell more shooting protests
    By THOMAS WATKINS (AP) – 1 hour ago

    LOS ANGELES — Police mobilized Wednesday to avoid more mayhem on the streets after being taken by surprise at consecutive nights of violent protests sparked by the fatal shooting of a knife-wielding man.

    The police chief, city officials and consuls general from three Latin American countries scheduled a community meeting as senior officers tried to reach out to residents of the central Los Angeles neighborhood where the man was shot.

    Sunday's killing of Manuel Jamines, 37, has turned into a rallying point as community members, aided by outsiders, have taken to the streets for two nights running and used the death to highlight past injustices and vent ongoing frustrations.

    Police have defended the killing and said they've been taken aback by the level of protest for a case that seemed like a clear-cut case of justifiable use of force. Each year, the LAPD is involved in up to about 40 shootings — those that typically cause controversy involve unarmed or surrendered suspects.

    Residents outraged over the killing have said police should have handled the situation differently and say the surprise by department brass shows that the force is out of touch with the people.

    Three bicycle officers were flagged down Sunday by people concerned about a man wielding a knife. The officers approached the suspect and told him in Spanish and English to put down the weapon.

    Instead, Jamines raised the knife above his head and lunged at Officer Frank Hernandez, a 13-year veteran of the department, said Capt. Kris Pitcher, who heads the Los Angeles Police Department's force investigation division.

    Hernandez shot Jamines twice in the head. He died at the scene. Several witnesses later told police Jamines had been drinking.

    "They could have used pepper spray or a Taser gun," said Salvador Sanabria, executive director of nonprofit community group El Rescate. "The community ... reacted this way because they thought there was another way to deal with a drunk guy."

    Pitcher said Jamines was an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala. He was carrying a switchblade knife with a serrated, 3-inch blade.

    Police said the knife was covered in blood, and DNA tests were being carried out to determine whose it was. Officers received unconfirmed reports Jamines may have attacked someone before police arrived, Pitcher said.

    The officers involved were placed on administrative leave, a standard move after shootings.

    An estimated 300 protesters who gathered outside the local police station pelted officers Tuesday night with eggs, rocks and bottles and set a trash bin on fire. Others dropped household items from apartment buildings.

    Officers fired at least two rounds of foam projectiles at demonstrators and 22 people were arrested, mainly for failure to disperse and unlawful assembly.

    A night earlier, three officers were slightly injured by thrown objects and four people were arrested on suspicion of misdemeanor inciting a riot.

    Police Chief Charlie Beck said he was surprised by the extent of the protests. Though he was withholding judgment on the case pending an investigation, he said the shooting seemed relatively non-controversial.

    "This was a tragic thing, I wish it would have worked out different," Beck said. "But the facts are very straightforward."

    The LAPD has long struggled with image problems in poorer communities.

    On May 1, 2007, police pummeled immigration rights marchers and reporters with batons and shot rubber bullets into the crowd. The city was gripped by widespread riots in 1992 after four white officers were acquitted of the videotaped beating of Rodney King, a black motorist.

    Beck said the recent protests were the culmination of a variety of frustrations, including a terrible economy and a feeling of victimization among immigrants who say the U.S. population likes to blame them for many of society's shortcomings.

    "As you polarize society, this is the kind of thing that can push forward," the chief said.

    He also blamed activist groups, including the Revolutionary Communist Party, for co-opting peaceful vigils and inciting violent protests.

    Beck patrolled the area as a captain in the aftermath of the Rampart corruption scandal, in which an LAPD anti-gang unit was the focus of allegations that officers framed and beat innocent people. He said community outreach had improved considerably since then but acknowledged his department could do more.

    Sanabria said residents were already angry with the police over strict enforcement of public drinking laws and clampdowns on street vendors. The police department doesn't go after immigrants based on their legal immigration status, but Sanabria said officers still could be more sensitive.

    "They don't understand the complexity of the ethnic demographic population they have here," Sanabria said.

    He added that Jamines' first language apparently was a Mayan dialect, not Spanish, and said some police need to be trained in it.

    The LAPD is vastly different today from the organization it was 20 years ago, with much greater racial and gender diversity. All three officers involved in Sunday's incident were Latino and spoke Spanish, former police chief William Bratton noted.

    He said immigrants arrive in the U.S. with an inbuilt mistrust of police and assume officers are corrupt.

    "People fear police," Bratton said. "The police are starting off with a major disadvantage. The irony is the department has consistently respected the rights of immigrants."

    Copyright © 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/art ... AD9I41HO81

  4. #24
    Senior Member dragonfire's Avatar
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    LA police hope to quell 3rd night of violence after officer'

    Fox News

    LA police hope to quell 3rd night of violence after officer's fatal shooting of knife man

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/09/08/la ... -wielding/

    LOS ANGELES – Police mobilized Wednesday to avoid more mayhem on the streets after being taken by surprise at consecutive nights of violent protests sparked by the fatal shooting of a knife-wielding man.

    The police chief, city officials and consuls general from three Latin American countries scheduled a community meeting as senior officers tried to reach out to residents of the central Los Angeles neighborhood where the man was shot.

    Sunday's killing of Manuel Jamines, 37, has turned into a rallying point as community members, aided by outsiders, have taken to the streets for two nights running and used the death to highlight past injustices and vent ongoing frustrations.

    Police have defended the killing and said they've been taken aback by the level of protest for a case that seemed like a clear-cut case of justifiable use of force. Each year, the LAPD is involved in up to about 40 shootings — those that typically cause controversy involve unarmed or surrendered suspects.

    Residents outraged over the killing have said police should have handled the situation differently and say the surprise by department brass shows that the force is out of touch with the people.

    Three bicycle officers were flagged down Sunday by people concerned about a man wielding a knife. The officers approached the suspect and told him in Spanish and English to put down the weapon.

    Instead, Jamines raised the knife above his head and lunged at Officer Frank Hernandez, a 13-year veteran of the department, said Capt. Kris Pitcher, who heads the Los Angeles Police Department's force investigation division.

    Hernandez shot Jamines twice in the head. He died at the scene. Several witnesses later told police Jamines had been drinking.

    "They could have used pepper spray or a Taser gun," said Salvador Sanabria, executive director of nonprofit community group El Rescate. "The community ... reacted this way because they thought there was another way to deal with a drunk guy."

    Pitcher said Jamines was an undocumented immigrant from Guatemala. He was carrying a switchblade knife with a serrated, 3-inch blade.

    Police said the knife was covered in blood, and DNA tests were being carried out to determine whose it was. Officers received unconfirmed reports Jamines may have attacked someone before police arrived, Pitcher said.

    The officers involved were placed on administrative leave, a standard move after shootings.

    An estimated 300 protesters who gathered outside the local police station pelted officers Tuesday night with eggs, rocks and bottles and set a trash bin on fire. Others dropped household items from apartment buildings.

    Officers fired at least two rounds of foam projectiles at demonstrators and 22 people were arrested, mainly for failure to disperse and unlawful assembly.

    A night earlier, three officers were slightly injured by thrown objects and four people were arrested on suspicion of misdemeanor inciting a riot.

    Police Chief Charlie Beck said he was surprised by the extent of the protests. Though he was withholding judgment on the case pending an investigation, he said the shooting seemed relatively non-controversial.

    "This was a tragic thing, I wish it would have worked out different," Beck said. "But the facts are very straightforward."

    The LAPD has long struggled with image problems in poorer communities.

    On May 1, 2007, police pummeled immigration rights marchers and reporters with batons and shot rubber bullets into the crowd. The city was gripped by widespread riots in 1992 after four white officers were acquitted of the videotaped beating of Rodney King, a black motorist.

    Beck said the recent protests were the culmination of a variety of frustrations, including a terrible economy and a feeling of victimization among immigrants who say the U.S. population likes to blame them for many of society's shortcomings.

    "As you polarize society, this is the kind of thing that can push forward," the chief said.

    He also blamed activist groups, including the Revolutionary Communist Party, for co-opting peaceful vigils and inciting violent protests.

    Beck patrolled the area as a captain in the aftermath of the Rampart corruption scandal, in which an LAPD anti-gang unit was the focus of allegations that officers framed and beat innocent people. He said community outreach had improved considerably since then but acknowledged his department could do more.

    Sanabria said residents were already angry with the police over strict enforcement of public drinking laws and clampdowns on street vendors. The police department doesn't go after immigrants based on their legal immigration status, but Sanabria said officers still could be more sensitive.

    "They don't understand the complexity of the ethnic demographic population they have here," Sanabria said.

    He added that Jamines' first language apparently was a Mayan dialect, not Spanish, and said some police need to be trained in it.

    The LAPD is vastly different today from the organization it was 20 years ago, with much greater racial and gender diversity. All three officers involved in Sunday's incident were Latino and spoke Spanish, former police chief William Bratton noted.

    He said immigrants arrive in the U.S. with an inbuilt mistrust of police and assume officers are corrupt.

    "People fear police," Bratton said. "The police are starting off with a major disadvantage. The irony is the department has consistently respected the rights of immigrants."
    Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote!

  5. #25
    Senior Member HoosierLady's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rita444
    This story was reported on FOX news today @ 4:00pm PC. Cops say this man had a knife and was headed toward the policeman. Apparently this all happened in about 40 seconds. Also, the knife this man had had blood on it. And the police are running test on the blood to try and find out who it belongs to.
    It was on FOX again at 7pm. They did give the man's name, which told you that he was hispanic, but they never mentioned anything about the people rioting, as in what race they were etc. They said the first night there were only 40 or so rioting but over 300 people were there last night and they were preparing for a lot more tonight.

  6. #26
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    Fox News also reported that there were "outside" agencies putting up posters, agitating the crowd, and in one or more cases possibly starting a confrontation or some unspecified type of trouble.

    I have to agree that they never mentioned illegals however they did mention that there were several South American nationals involved as tomorrow the mayor is having a meeting with members from the different consulates. I know they mentioned Honduras, Mexico, and one other country.

  7. #27
    Senior Member ShockedinCalifornia's Avatar
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    Watch tonight's news story video on link

    Community wants answers after LAPD shooting

    Wednesday, September 08, 2010
    By Melissa MacBride and Leslie Miller

    WESTLAKE DISTRICT, LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- After a fatal Westlake District police shooting sparked two days of protests, the Los Angeles Police Department is prepared for a third day of demonstrations.

    Protesters marched from Sixth Street and Union Avenue, the location of the shooting, up to the Rampart station on Tuesday night, angry over the death of 37-year-old Manuel Jamines.

    Sunday, witnesses said Jamines was drunk while walking along a busy strip mall as he threatened pedestrians with a knife. Witnesses flagged down police, who ultimately shot and killed Jamines after he reportedly lunged at officers, knife in hand.

    Demonstrators filled the streets two nights in a row and what began as a peaceful march with purpose turned into violence both nights as people started throwing rocks and glass bottles at police officers and lit garbage cans on fire.

    Officers in riot gear tried to disperse the crowd initially with verbal warnings. When that didn't work, they fired non-lethal bean bag projectiles. Authorities said 14 people were arrested during Tuesday's protests for inciting a riot and unlawful assembly.

    The Westlake District is home to many people from Central America.

    Officers who patrol this community are taking the events of the last three days pretty hard.

    "The vast majority of Rampart officers are Spanish-speaking officers. They interact with the community on a daily basis," said Los Angeles Police Department Lt. Cory Palka. "The officers involved in the shooting are bicycle officers who were on foot and have a high presence and a high visibility in the community. They're very sensitive and it's very difficult to deal with an issue like this."

    "It's not right. Why would you kill an innocent person? Probably he was drunk, but they could have taken the situation professionally," said a protester.

    Jamines was a construction worker from Guatemala, where he leaves behind a wife and three children. He has cousins in Los Angeles who are trying to raise money to send his body back to his homeland.

    LAPD Chief Charlie Beck wants people who witnessed the events leading up to the deadly shooting to contact the Guatemalan Consulate if they don't feel comfortable giving information to police.

    In an attempt to repair the relationship between the police and the community, a meeting is planned to discuss the officers' use of force. The meeting aims to provide an opportunity for police to explain the circumstances leading up to the shooting.

    One resident who didn't want to be identified said the meeting will be a waste of time, saying that such meetings in the past have not brought about any change.

    On the other hand, other residents said the meeting will at least get the dialogue going.

    "More people from Guatemala need to stop violence. Don't damage cars, don't damage people. Everybody needs to talk," said another Westlake District resident Gustavo Villatoro.

    "If a cop kills somebody, and then the whole community goes crazy, what does that say about us? What does that say of the Hispanic community?" said Westlake resident Daniel Mendoza.

    The community meeting is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at John Leichty Middle School located at 650 South Union Ave. in Los Angeles. The LAPD, L.A. Councilman Ed Reyes, and the consuls general of Guatemala, Mexico and Nicaragua are expected at the meeting.

    http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?secti ... id=7656130

  8. #28
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    I didn't see this on the west coast edition of the national N.B.C. 5:30 p.m. news

    or the national C.B.S. 6:00 p.m. news.

    (I think I was paying attention.)
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  9. #29

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    LA Riots?!

    I am not sure the time stamps I've seen on responses are accurate.
    FOR THE RECORD: I'm sending this as of 6:41pm PST in Reno NV. SEPT 8th
    ABC,CBS, and NBC focused on the pastor in Florida (koran burning) the fires in Boulder Colorado, and Detroit, and the flooding in Texas. Not one word of anything in LA.

  10. #30
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Re: LA Riots?!

    Quote Originally Posted by ProfessorX
    I am not sure the time stamps I've seen on responses are accurate.
    FOR THE RECORD: I'm sending this as of 6:41pm PST in Reno NV. SEPT 8th
    ABC,CBS, and NBC focused on the pastor in Florida (koran burning) the fires in Boulder Colorado, and Detroit, and the flooding in Texas. Not one word of anything in LA. :(
    You can set your time zone by clicking on PROFILE at the top of the page and scrolling down to time zone.
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


    Sign in and post comments here.

    Please support our fight against illegal immigration by joining ALIPAC's email alerts here https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

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