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  1. #1
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    BLM is actually a sub-corporation of UNITED STATES INCORPORATED



    BLM is actually a sub-corporation of UNITED STATES INCORPORATED, a private foreign owned off-shore corporation since its last incorporation in 1925, copyrighted, trademarked and registered in Puerto Rico).Under the Reorganization Act of Washington District of Columbia, by it’s
    own private business charter, neither the BLM, nor any other
    federal/corporate agency has lawful/legal authority, jurisdiction or
    interstate nexus within the 50 state geographical landmass.
    *BLM, is actually classified as an: “Agent of Foreign Principle”, under the
    intergovernmental Personnel Act.
    *In other words, they don’t represent the Constitutional Republic or the
    interests of the American People but rather, a foreign owned principle
    i.e., the international banking/military corporate cartel of London City,
    England known as Crown Corporation as their supreme authority.

    *This has been openly admitted and exposed through Supreme Court cases since
    and even before 1938.

    People, this country is being sold out, piecemeal: Moapa Paiute Tribe, LADWP and First Solar Break Ground on 250MW Solar Project (NASDAQ:FSLR)?




    http://www.godlikeproductions.com/fo...age2528147/pg1

    http://www.fromthetrenchesworldrepor...ranchers/83969




    I search this information when someone sent it to me this is what I found....I am stll looking for more on this subject, maybe some one else can find something. Hmmmm now that I think of it are the other 3 letter agency's in the same category???
    Last edited by kathyet2; 04-19-2014 at 12:43 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    Federal Reserve President Says The Federal Reserve is a Private Corporation !!!

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  3. #3
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    Bureau of Land Management: Private Company Information ...


    Company Overview

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) offers land management and wildlife preservation services. The organization develops and manages more than 260 million acres of surface and subsurface public land and mineral estate. It also assists in the preservation of horses and wildernesses. BLM is based in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

    5353 Yellowstone Road
    Cheyenne, WY 82009
    United States

    Phone:307-775-6256
    Fax: 307-775-6129

    http://investing.businessweek.com/re...vcapId=9450207
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  4. #4
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    Western lawmakers gather in Utah to talk federal land takeover

    "We have to start managing these lands. It’s the right thing to do for our people, for our environment, for our economy and for our freedoms."
    "It’s simply time," said Rep. Ken Ivory, R-West Jordan, who organized the Legislative Summit on the Transfer for Public Lands along with Montana state Sen. Jennifer Fielder. "The urgency is now."

    Utah House Speaker Becky Lockhart, R-Provo, was flanked by a dozen participants, including her counterparts from Idaho and Montana, during a press conference after the daylong closed-door summit. U.S. Sen. Mike Lee addressed the group over lunch, Ivory said. New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, Wyoming, Oregon and Washington also were represented.

    The summit was in the works before this month’s tense standoff between Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management over cattle grazing, Lockhart said.

    "What’s happened in Nevada is really just a symptom of a much larger problem," Lockhart said.

    Fielder, who described herself as "just a person who lives in the woods," said federal land management is hamstrung by bad policies, politicized science and severe federal budget cuts.

    "Those of us who live in the rural areas know how to take care of lands," Fielder said, who lives in the northwestern Montana town of Thompson Falls.

    "We have to start managing these lands. It’s the right thing to do for our people, for our environment, for our economy and for our freedoms," Fielder said.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
    BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT


    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
    BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT

    http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en.html
    OF LAND MANAGEMENT
    National

    • What We Do
    • Visit Us
    • Information Center
    • Get Involved
    • Our Offices/Centers
    • Contact Us
    BLM>Information>Directory
    Print Page
    Washington Office Directories
    Director: Neil Kornze
    Deputy Director (Operations): Steve Ellis
    Deputy Director (Policy): Linda Lance
    Chief of Staff: Janet Lin
    For all of the above, please use:
    BLM Washington Office
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5665
    Washington DC 20240
    Phone: 202-208-3801
    Fax: 202-208-5242
    director@blm.gov


    Salvatore R. Lauro
    Director, Office of Law Enforcement and Security
    1849 C Street, NW, Rm. 5637
    Washington, D.C. 20240
    Phone: 202-208-3269
    FAX: 202-208-3049
    E-mail: SLauro@blm.gov


    Mike Nedd
    Assistant Director, Minerals and Realty Management
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5625
    Phone: 202-208-4201
    Fax: 202-208-4800
    E-mail: mnedd@blm.gov




    Tim Murphy
    Assistant Director, Office of Fire and Aviation
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5070
    Phone: 202-208-5440
    Fax: 202-208-3812
    E-mail: tmurphy@blm.gov




    Celia Boddington
    Assistant Director, Communications
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5645
    Washington, DC 20240
    Phone: 202-208-6913
    Fax: 202-208-6769
    E-mail: cbodding@blm.gov




    Janine Velasco
    Assistant Director, Business and Fiscal Resources
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5624
    Washington, DC 20240
    Phone: 202-208-4864
    FAX: 202-208-5964
    E-mail: jvelasco@blm.gov




    Other BLM Offices





    Edwin Roberson
    Assistant Director, Resources and Planning
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5644
    Phone: 202-208-4896
    Fax: 202-208-5010
    E-mail: eroberso@blm.gov




    Lisa Jollay
    Acting Assistant Director, Information Resources Mgt.
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5612
    Phone: 202-208-7701
    Fax: 202-208-5902
    E-mail: ljollay@blm.gov




    Carole Carter-Pfisterer
    Assistant Director, Human Capital Management
    1849 C Street NW, Rm. 5611
    Washington, DC 20240
    Phone: 202-501-6723
    FAX: 202-208-6687
    E-mail: capfiste@blm.gov




    Carl Rountree
    Director, Office of National Landscape Conservation System and Community Programs

    1849 C Street NW
    Washington, DC 20240
    Phone: 202-208-3516
    FAX: 202-606-3156
    E-mail: crountre@blm.gov





    Last updated: 04-10-2014

    http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/info/directory.html

    http://www.blm.gov
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  6. #6
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    BLM - The Bureau of Land Management

    www.blm.gov/‎

    United States Bureau of Land Management

    The Bureau of Land Management administers 264 million acres of public lands, located primarily in the 12 Western States, containing natural, historical, cultural, ...


    California BLM

    BLM California also manages 1.6 million acres in ...

    Wild Horse and Burro Program

    Adoption Program - Adoption Schedule - Myths and Facts - ...

    BLM New Mexico, Oklahoma ...

    Oil and Gas - Recreation - Geographic Sciences - ...

    Arizona

    BLM Offices - Recreation - Filing a Mining Claim - Tucson Field Office

    General Land Office Records

    Welcome to the Bureau of Land Management(BLM), General ...

    Nevada

    Nevada state office, U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Offers ...

    More results from blm.gov »
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  7. #7
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Bureau of Land Management

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior that administers America's public lands, totaling approximately 247.3 million acres, or one-eighth of the landmass of the country.[1]

    The BLM also manages 700 million acres (2,800,000 km2) of subsurface mineral estate underlying federal, state, and private lands. Most public lands are located in western states, especially Alaska. With approximately 10,000 permanent employees and close to 2,000 seasonal employees, this works out to over 21,000 acres (85 km2) per employee. The agency's budget was US$960,000,000 for 2010 ($3.79 per surface acre, $9.38 per hectare).[2]


    The BLM's stated mission is to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


    History


    Horses crossing a plain near the Simpson Park Wilderness Study Area in central Nevada, managed by the Battle Mountain BLM Field Office


    Snow covered cliffs of Snake River Canyon, Idaho, managed by the Boise District of the BLM

    The BLM's pure roots go back to the Land Ordinance of 1785 and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787.

    These laws provided for the survey and settlement of the lands that the original 13 colonies ceded to the federal government after theAmerican Revolution. As additional lands were acquired by the United States from Spain,France and other countries, the United States Congress directed that they be explored, surveyed, and made available for settlement.

    In 1812, Congress established the General Land Office in the Department of the Treasury to oversee the disposition of these federal lands. As the 19th century progressed and the nation's land base expanded further west, Congress encouraged the settlement of the land by enacting a wide variety of laws, including the Homestead Act and the Mining Law of 1872.


    These statutes served one of the major policy goals of the young country—settlement of the Western territories. With the exception of the Mining Law of 1872 and the Desert Land Act of 1877 (which was amended), all have since been repealed or superseded by other statutes.


    The late 19th century marked a shift in federal land management priorities with the creation of the first national parks, forests, and wildlife refuges. By withdrawing these lands from settlement, Congress signaled a shift in the policy goals served by the public lands. Instead of using them to promote settlement, Congress decided that they should be held in public ownership because of their other resource values.


    Sheep graze on BLM land in Snake Valley, Utah.

    In the early 20th century, Congress took additional steps toward recognizing the value of the assets on public lands and directed theExecutive Branch to manage activities on the remaining public lands.

    The Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 allowed leasing, exploration, and production of selected commodities, such as coal,oil, gas, and sodium to take place on public lands. The Taylor Grazing Act of 1934 established the U.S. Grazing Service to manage the public rangelands.

    The Oregon and California (O&C) Act of August 28, 1937, required sustained yield management of the timberlands in western Oregon.

    In 1946, the Grazing Service was merged with the General Land Office (a product of the country's territorial expansion and the federal government's nineteenth-century homesteading policies) to form the Bureau of Land Management within the Department of the Interior.

    When the BLM was initially created, there were over 2,000 unrelated and often conflicting laws for managing the public lands. The BLM had no unified legislative mandate until Congress enacted the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA).


    In FLPMA, Congress recognized the value of the remaining public lands by declaring that these lands would remain in public ownership.

    Congress used the term "multiple use" management, defined as "management of the public lands and their various resource values so that they are utilized in the combination that will best meet the present and future needs of the American people."


    The land management policy of the federal government before 1946 involved on the one hand rapid disposal to miners, ranchers and farmers, and on the other hand reservations for national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, and military needs. The combination of 1946 of the General Land Office and the Grazing Service into the new Bureau of Land Management was filled with ambiguity. In terms of bureaucracy, there has been a constant tension between the local district rangers, who have typically been oriented toward the mining and ranching interests, and the centralized leadership in Washington that follows presidential guidance. Since the Reagan years of the 1980s, Republicans have emphasized local control giving priority to grazing, mining and petroleum production, while Democrats have emphasized environmentalism.[3]


    Today



    Kokopelli petroglyph located on BLM land near Embudo, New Mexico



    Most of the public lands held by the Bureau of Land Management are in the Western states.Alaska ranks first in total BLM acreage at 87 million acres (350,000 km2), while Nevada and Utah have the highest percentage of their lands under BLM management.[4]



    BLM geodetic control point from 1950 in Colorado



    BLM cadastral survey marker from 1992 in San Xavier, Arizona.

    The BLM regulates activities in hunting, fishing, camping,hiking, boating, hang gliding,shooting, off-highway vehicle driving, mountain biking,birding, and visiting natural and cultural heritage sites. The BLM also regulates logging, mining, fracking and other activities.

    The BLM administers 205,498 miles (330,717 km) of fishable streams, 2.2 million acres (8,900 km2) of lakes and reservoirs, 6,600 miles (10,600 km) of floatable rivers, over 500 boating access points, 69 National Back Country Byways, and 300 Watchable Wildlife sites. The BLM also manages 4,500 miles (7,200 km) of National Scenic, Historic, and Recreational Trails, as well as thousands of miles of multiple use trails used by motorcyclists, hikers, equestrians, and mountain bikers.

    Of the BLM’s 247.3 million acres, the Bureau manages 55 million acres (220,000 km2) of forests and woodlands, including 11 million acres (45,000 km2) of commercial forest and 44 million acres (180,000 km2) of woodlands within 11 western States and Alaska. 53 million acres (210,000 km2) are productive forests and woodlands on Public Domain lands and 2.4 million acres (9,700 km2) are on Oregon and CaliforniaGrant lands in western Oregon. Additionally, as part of its trust responsibility, the BLM oversees minerals operations on 56 million acres (230,000 km2) of Indian lands. In addition, the BLM also has a National Wild Horse and Burro Program in which it manages animals on public rangelands. Even though the BLM manages one of the largest amount of public land in the United States, resource protection of BLM public lands is being done on an on-going reduced budget, with uniformed law enforcement rangers patrolling an average of 1.45 million acres (5,900 km2) per ranger.

    The BLM is a significant revenue producer to the United States budget.

    In 2009, public lands were expected to generate an estimated $6.2 billion in revenues, mostly from energy development. Nearly 43.5 percent of these receipts are provided directly to states and counties to support roads, schools, and other community needs.[5]


    Increasingly, the BLM has had to address the needs of a growing and changing West. Ten of the 12 western states with significant proportions of BLM-managed lands have among the fastest rates of population growth in the United States.


    One of the BLM's goals is to recognize the demands of public land users while addressing the needs of traditional user groups and working within smaller budgets. Perhaps one of the Bureau's greatest challenges is to develop more effective land management practices, while becoming more efficient at the same time.


    The BLM has a wide range of responsibilities, including collecting geographic information, maintaining records of land ownership and mineral rights, conserving wilderness areas while allocating other areas for grazing and agriculture, and protecting cultural heritage sites on public land. The BLM operates theNational Landscape Conservation System, which protects some U.S. National Monuments, someNational Wild and Scenic Rivers, and some designated wildernesses among other types of areas including wilderness study areas.


    Lightning-sparked wildfires are frequent occurrences on BLM land in Nevada.

    The BLM is a major employer of wildland firefighters, range conservationists, foresters, botanists, land specialists, geologists, archaeologists, biologists, outdoor recreation planners, and surveyors.
    The BLM was involved in the Bundy standoff.

    Law enforcement and security


    The BLM Office of Law Enforcement & Security, headquartered in Washington, D.C., is a federal law enforcement agency of the U.S. government. All Law Enforcement Rangers and Special Agents receive their training through Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC). Law Enforcement Rangers attend the Land Management Police Training (LMPT) academy at FLTEC, while BLM Special Agents attend the Criminal Investigator Training Program (CITP) at FLETC.

    BLM Law Enforcement Rangers and Special Agents make up the law enforcement capability of the BLM. Rangers and Special Agents are located in each of the western states that have BLM lands. Law Enforcement Rangers make up the uniformed high visibility enforcement of laws. Special Agents investigate crimes against property, visitors and employees.

    Uniformed Law Enforcement Rangers enforce Federal laws and regulations governing BLM lands and resources. Law Enforcement Rangers also enforce some or all state laws on BLM lands. As part of that mission Law Enforcement Rangers carry firearms, defensive equipment, make arrests, execute search warrants, complete reports and testify in court. They establish a regular and recurring presence on a vast amount of public lands, roads, and recreation sites. The primary focus of their jobs is the protection of natural resources, protection of BLM employees and the protection of visitors. They use K-9s, helicopters, snowmobiles, dirt bikes and boats to perform their duties.

    Special Agents
    are criminal investigators who plan and conduct investigations concerning possible violations of criminal and administrative provisions of the BLM and other statutes under the United States Code. Special agents are normally plain clothes officers who carry concealed firearms, and other defensive equipment, make arrests, carry out complex criminal investigations, present cases for prosecution to U.S. Attorneys, and prepare investigative reports. Criminal investigators occasionally conduct internal and civil claim investigations.


    Horses and burros


    See also: Mustang (horse) and Burro

    Mustangs run across Tule Valley, Utah

    The BLM manages free-roaming horses and burros on public lands in 10 western states. They classify these animals as feral, but are also obligated to protect them under the Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. As horses have few natural predators, populations have grown substantially. BLM estimates that as of 2009, there were nearly 37,000 horses and burros on BLM-managed rangelands. The BLM claims that is 10,000 more animals than can exist in balance with other public rangeland resources and uses.[citation needed] BLM holds about 32,000 additional animals in long-and short term holding facilities and adopts out several thousand each year.[6]

    The BLM conducts environmental assessments, detailed scientific documents designed to examine land and animal health, before each gather. After conducting these assessments, BLM determines how many horses it will remove from the range. In most cases, environmental assessments determine that horses must be removed because increasing herd numbers are damaging rangeland health, stream and river areas, and native wildlife habitat. In most Herd Management Areas throughout the arid West, food for horses quickly becomes scarce, especially during drought or long winters.

    Scientists[who?] have found that one horse can require up to 20 acres (81,000 m2) of rangeland to sustain nutritional health for one month.[citation needed]


    The Wild and Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971, as amended, authorizes BLM to humanely put down horses for which no adoption demand exists.[7]


    The BLM sometimes rounds up mustangs and then may sell them to people as pets or working horses. The ranches they are sold on receive inspections to see if the ranch is good enough for the horse. If a person has proof the mustang is their horse, they may recover their horse. After one year, the buyer of the horse is the official owner.


    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar proposed on October 7, 2009, a new approach to restore the health of America’s wild horse herds and the public rangelands that support them.[8] His proposal includes the possible creation of "wild" horse preserves on the productive grasslands of the Midwest and East. Salazar also proposed showcasing certain herds on public lands in the West that warrant distinct recognition with Secretarial or possibly congressional designations and applying new strategies to balance population growth rates with adoption demand (such as the use of fertility control). The Salazar proposal, which is subject to congressional approval, includes making adoptions more flexible where appropriate to encourage more people to adopt horses.


    Renewable energy coordination offices


    In one of his last official acts of office, Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne has helped pave the way for his replacement, Ken Salazar, by authorizing the BLM to establish offices that will expedite renewable energy development on the National System of Public Lands. The new Renewable Energy Coordination Offices will expedite the permitting of wind, solar, biomass, and geothermal projects on BLM-managed lands, along with the electrical transmission facilities needed to deliver the energy from those projects to power-thirsty cities.[9]

    The offices will initially be located in the four states where companies have shown the greatest interest in renewable energy development: Arizona, California, Nevada, and Wyoming. The new offices will also improve the BLM's coordination with state agencies and other federal agencies, including DOE and theU.S. Environmental Protection Agency.[9]


    In October 2009, Interior Secretary Salazar and BLM Director Bob Abbey officially opened the California Renewable Energy Coordination Office and are staffing additional offices in Arizona, Nevada and Wyoming. To lead the overall initiative, Secretary Salazar has established a National Renewable Energy Office at BLM’s Headquarters in Washington D.C.[10]


    The four Renewable Energy Coordinating Offices have 62 positions to support the processing of renewable energy and transmission applications. Thirty-five additional renewable energy support staff have been identified for BLM renewable permitting teams in the western states of Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, and Utah.


    Energy transport corridors


    The BLM and the U.S. Forest Service issued Records of Decision in mid-January to amend 130 of their land use plans to support the designation of more than 6,000 miles (9,700 km) of energy transport corridors on federal lands in 11 Western States. The amendments were based on analyses presented in a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that was prepared by the BLM, DOE and the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Defense as part of their work to implement the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The PEIS, released late last year, identifies energy corridors in the West for transmission and distribution lines that will help facilitate the development of renewable energy resources. The energy corridors could also carry pipelines for oil, natural gas, and hydrogen. Approximately 5,000 miles (8,000 km) of energy corridors are located on BLM-managed lands, while nearly 1,000 miles (1,600 km) of energy corridors are on U.S. Forest Service lands. Roughly 120 miles (190 km) of corridor segments are on lands managed by the Bureau of Reclamation, the National Park Service, and the Department of Defense.[9]

    Western Energy Corridor


    Tom Kaiserski, Montana with the Idaho National Laboratory developed a report on the "Western Energy Corridor that stretches from the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan down through Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, Utah and Colorado," examining the "Western perspective to form an organization to represent these states and quantifies the energy resources in the footprint area."[11]

    Oil shale leases


    The BLM is currently reviewing its policies for leasing land for oil shale development. In March 2011, the BLM issued the following statement:
    "As there are no economically viable ways yet known to extract and process oil shale for commercial purposes, and Utah tar sands deposits are not at present a proven commercially-viable energy source, the BLM, through its planning process, intends to take a hard look at whether it is appropriate for approximately 2,000,000 acres to remain available for potential development of oil shale, and approximately 431,224 acres of public land to remain available for potential development of tar sands."[12]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bureau_of_Land_Management
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  8. #8
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    Mr. Bundy knows that the bullies of the BLM would much rather send a SWAT team after him than after 50 illegal aliens being smuggled by a gun-toting cartel across the southwestern desert.

    One, he called attention to the frightening fact that the federal government owns 83% of the land in Nevada. Note that “federal” and “government” are the key words and yet are abstractions. Rather, a few thousands unelected employees — in the BLM, EPA, Defense Department, and other alphabet soup agencies — can pretty much do what they want on the land they control. And note, this is not quite the case in Silicon Valley or Manhattan or Laguna Beach.
    I’m sure that Cliven Bundy probably could have cut a deal with the Bureau of Land Management and should have. Of course, it’s never wise to let a federal court order hang over your head. And certainly we cannot have a world of Cliven Bundys if a legal system is to function.

    In a practical sense, I also know that if I were to burn brush on a no-burn day, or toss an empty pesticide container in the garbage bin, or shoot a coyote too near the road, I would incur the wrath of the government in a way someone does not who dumps a stripped stolen auto (two weeks ago) in my vineyard, or solvents, oil, and glass (a few months ago), or rips out copper wire from the pump for the third time (last year). Living in a Winnebago with a porta-potty and exposed Romex in violation of zoning statutes for many is not quite breaking the law where I live; having a mailbox five inches too high for some others certainly is.

    So Mr. Bundy must realize that in about 1990 we decided to focus on the misdemeanor of the law-abiding citizen and to ignore the felony of the lawbreaker. The former gave law enforcement respect; the latter ignored their authority. The first made or at least did not cost enforcers money; arresting the second began a money-losing odyssey of incarceration, trials, lawyers, appeals, and all the rest.

    Mr. Bundy knows that the bullies of the BLM would much rather send a SWAT team after him than after 50 illegal aliens being smuggled by a gun-toting cartel across the southwestern desert. How strange, then, at this late postmodern date, for someone like Bundy on his horse still to be playing the law-breaking maverick Jack Burns (Kirk Douglas) in (the David Miller, Dalton Trumbo, Edward Abbey effort) Lonely Are the Brave.

    But the interest in Mr. Bundy’s case is not about legal strategies in revolving fiscal disagreements with the federal government.

    Instead, we all have followed Mr. Bundy for three reasons.

    One, he called attention to the frightening fact that the federal government owns 83% of the land in Nevada. Note that “federal” and “government” are the key words and yet are abstractions. Rather, a few thousands unelected employees — in the BLM, EPA, Defense Department, and other alphabet soup agencies — can pretty much do what they want on the land they control. And note, this is not quite the case in Silicon Valley or Manhattan or Laguna Beach. The danger can be summed up by a scene I see about once a month on a Fresno freeway: a decrepit truck stopped by the California Highway Patrol for having inadequate tarps on a trailer of green clippings, just as a new city garbage truck speeds by, with wet garbage flying over the median. Who will police the police?

    http://pjmedia.com/victordavishanson...the-rural-way/
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  9. #9
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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  10. #10
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    Is BLM a criminal racketeering operation?

    Some have made a legal observation that the BLM, which falls under the U.S. Department of the Interior, may be guilty of racketeering under federal RICO (Racketeer Influenced and Corruption Organization) statutes.



    This photo was posted by Assemblywoman Michel Fiore. In a widely-shared tweet, Fiore says, “Graphic Photo – One of many casualties from the #BundyRanch standoff. More to follow soon. #ShameOnBLM”

    During a live radio broadcast of “The Pete Santilli Show” on the Guerilla Media Network (GMN), Fiore revealed new details of “the BLM’s method of herding where they have slaughtered horses and cows.”

    “This time we have video of it, and pictures of it,” she said. “I did post the first picture of one cow [that] was shot in the back of the head from a helicopter. I personally helped save a calf who still had an umbilical cord attached to her as she was separated from her mom. It is such a disgusting event … they (BLM) don’t herd cattle — they slaughter cattle.”

    “If you look at the stewardship of land, and herding of cattle, first of all these particular cattle that were grazing on 600,000 acres — understand that when the Bundy family would herd their own cattle, there would be water taps to where the cattle would go down to the water and herd them humbly and softly — no cruelty, no abuse, herding them to where the cattle could get injured,” Fiore continued. “We now have an evidenced-based argument with how the BLM cannot take care of that cattle. We have cows giving birth (in the federal pen) where baby calves have been stepped [on] and killed.”

    “They herd animals with helicopters, ATV’s and shotguns… If any cows get out of line, the get a bullet to the back of the head,” she added. “Make sure the BLM are off state land and make sure the BLM are not allowed to herd cattle again”.
    She said she observed, near the BLM’s “compound” adjacent to the Bundy ranch, that personnel there were “digging holes.”

    “They tried to bury some cows on the compound,” she said, “but I guess they didn’t dig the hole deep enough.” She said the legs of some cows were “sticking up out of the dirt.”

    BLM head Daniel P. Love caught flat-out lying about cattle deaths

    Earlier this week Natural News released a secret recording of the BLM Special Agent in Charge at the ranch, Daniel P. Love, who said that the BLM had not killed any cattle. Fiore’s reply to Love’s claim: “He’s a flat out liar, period.”

    Observers who gathered to offer support to Bundy and his family noted early on that BLM officials had brought in backhoes and earth movers, though initially agents would not answer residents’ questions as to why the equipment was needed. Later it was suspected that BLM-led contractors used them to dig holes to bury dead cattle after attempts to aggressively herd them off Bundy’s ranch. Many suspect that the contractors may have disposed of some cattle off-site, 21st Century Wire reported.

    Government tactics caused death of cattle


    “It was confirmed by ranchers and observers last week of how the BLM and their ‘contract cowboys’ had deployed aggressive practices whilst rustling the Bundy’s herd, using tactical helicopters [and] forcing cattle to removal zones, often times driving cows uphill in 90-degree heat — a lethal practice known to cause tremendous stress and exhaustion to the animals, causing sickness and even premature death,” the wire service reported.

    “In addition, reports by observers confirmed that spring heifers who were subject to abusive BLM tactics were forced to abandon some calves behind to hide in the desert bush (a common practice by mothers who are being rustled, who later can backtrack to retrieve their young) putting the calves at risk of death.”

    Critics now believe the BLM and Clark County Sheriff’s Office could face legal challenges for reckless handling of the situation. It is now obvious that they were all complicit in the commission of horrific atrocities against animals.

    The lamestream media continues to pretend none of this ever happened, hoping a nationwide blackout on the story will cause it to go away.

    http://21stcenturywire.com/2014/04/1...m-bundy-ranch/
    Join our FIGHT AGAINST illegal immigration & to secure US borders by joining our E-mail Alerts at http://eepurl.com/cktGTn

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