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  1. #1
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
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    WND: Feds buying 100 years worth of ammo - WND Poll Question

    Feds buying 100 YEARS worth of ammo

    OK, now it's getting serious.

    The federal government just can't stop buying ammunition -- so much so, it could reportedly last a century.

    Why on Earth is this taking place?
    WND

    Feds buying 100 years worth of ammo

    Government's argument 'could only fool a career civil servant'

    Published: 1 hour ago

    When the numbers are put in perspective, the federal government’s extraordinary buildup of ammunition looks even more ominous than critics already have portrayed it.

    An analysis by Forbes contributor Ralph Benko shows the 1.6 billion rounds of ammo that the government is acquiring would be enough for more than 100 years of training.

    As WND previously reported, it also would be enough ammunition to fight a war for more than 20 years.

    It would give the federal government enough ammunition to shoot every American more than five times.

    Concerned about surveillance drones, tanks in the streets and gun confiscation? Find out “HOW AMERICA IS BECOMING A POLICE STATE” in this shocking WND special report.

    The Department of Homeland Security argues it is buying in bulk to save money, explaining it uses as many as 15 million rounds a year for training law enforcement agents.

    Forbes columnist Benko, who worked for two years in the U.S. Department of Energy’s general counsel’s office in its procurement and finance division, doubts the government’s explanation.

    “To claim that it’s to “get a low price” for a ridiculously wasteful amount is an argument that could only fool a career civil servant,” he writes.

    But it’s not just the amount of ammo the feds are buying, it’s the type of ammo that’s also is causing concern.

    WND has reported the DHS order apparently includes hollow-point bullets. As WND recently reported, she believes the federal government is “stockpiling bullets in case of civil unrest.”

    Last month, Palin said the feds were afraid of what might happen if the sequester went into effect and if the government eventually went broke.

    She wrote on her Facebook page: “If we are going to wet our proverbial pants over 0.3% in annual spending cuts when we’re running up trillion-dollar annual deficits, then we’re done. Put a fork in us. We’re finished. We’re going to default eventually, and that’s why the feds are stockpiling bullets in case of civil unrest.”

    Weeks before Palin’s warning, WND CEO Joseph Farah paired the ammo buildup with a statement made by then-candidate Barack Obama in 2008 calling for a “civilian national security force” as big, as strong and as well-funded as the Defense Department.

    In Colorado July 2, 2008, Obama said: “We cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives we’ve set. We’ve got to have a civilian national security force that’s just as powerful, just as strong, just as well-funded.”

    Farah asked: “Why does the civilian Department of Homeland Security need billions of rounds of ammunition?

    This is the agency that is responsible for policing the border. But it doesn’t. This is the agency that is responsible for catching terrorists. But it doesn’t. So why does Homeland Security need so many weapons and enough hollow-point rounds to plug every American six times?”

    The federal stockpiling of ammunition could cause a problem for local law enforcement agencies. WND reported in January that police and sheriff departments around the country were beginning to experience an ammo shortage.

    Brownells, the largest supplier of firearm accessories in the world, reported it had sold several years’ worth of ammunition in just a matter of hours.

    The company released a statement apologizing for the delay in fulfilling orders, explaining it had experienced “unprecedented” demand for AR-15 ammunition magazines since earlier in the week.

    Gun companies are already fighting back. Olympic Arms of New York, which sells AR-15s and other firearms, says it will no longer sell guns to police. A company statement says that’s because legislation “recently passed in New York outlaws the AR-15 and many other firearms and “will make it illegal for the good and free citizens of New York to own a large selection of legal and safe firearms and magazines.”

    “Olympic Arms would like to announce,” the statement said, “that the State of New York, any Law Enforcement Departments, Law Enforcement Officers, First Responders within the State of New York, or any New York State government entity or employee of such an entity – will no longer be served as customers.”

    In Texas, LaRue Tactical is refusing to sell its AR rifles to police in states that limit the features of civilian rifles.

    Magpul, a gun magazine manufacturer based in Erie, Colo., says it will not sell gun magazines to law enforcement officers unless they pledge to uphold the Second and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
    Magpul also vows to leave Colorado if House Bill 1224 passes. The bill would limit gun magazines to 15 rounds.

    WND has reported growing federal police power across dozens of government agencies for more than a decade and a half.

    In 1997, WND exposed the fact that 60,000 federal agents were enforcing more than 3,000 criminal laws. The report prompted Larry Pratt of Gun Owners of America to remark: “Good grief, that’s a standing army. … It’s outrageous.”

    Also in 1997, as part of a ongoing series on the militarization of the federal government, WND reported armed, “environment crime” cops employed by the Environmental Protection Agency and a federal law enforcement program had trained 325,000 prospective federal police since 1970.

    WND also reported on thousands of armed officers in the Inspectors’ General office and a gun-drawn raid on a local flood control center to haul off 40 boxes of paperwork.

    WND further reported a plan by then-Delaware Sen. Joe Biden to hire hundreds of armed Hong Kong policemen in dozens of U.S. federal agencies to counter Asian organized crime in America.

    In 1999, Farah warned there were more than 80,000 armed federal law enforcement agents, constituting “the virtual standing army over which the founding fathers had nightmares.” Today, that number has nearly doubled.

    Also in 1999 WND reported plans made for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, to use military and police forces to deal with Y2K.

    In 2000, Farah discussed a Justice Department report on the growth of federal police agents under President Clinton, something Farah labeled “the biggest arms buildup in the history of the federal government – and it’s not taking place in the Defense Department.”

    A 2001 report warned of a persistent campaign by the Department of the Interior, this time following 9/11, to gain police powers for its agents.

    In 2008, WND reported on proposed rules to expand the military’s use inside U.S. borders to prevent “environmental damage” or respond to “special events” and to establish policies for “military support for civilian law enforcement.”
    Should Obama cut down on ammo purchases rather than White House tours?


    • No, the government needs to buy up ammunition to keep it out of the hands of kooks and murderers
    • No, the government needs ammunition to keep us safe
    • No, Obama is doing the right thing by cutting back on White House tours
    • No, the amount of ammunition being purchased is normal and seems reasonable
    • No, it takes a lot of money to build up a civilian security force equal to the military
    • No, apparently you can still get a White House tour for a $500,000 donation
    • Closing down the tours is a good first step. We should shut down the rest of the White House next
    • Yes, if the feds weren't buying so much ammunition, maybe Americans could get their hands on some
    • Yes, especially since police and even Marines are now being told to ration ammunition
    • Yes, why in the world do feds need five bullets for every person in the United States?
    • Yes, it seems to me the Founding Fathers warned against a 'standing army'
    • Yes, the amount of money they're spending during federal budget cuts is ludicrous
    • Yes, the massive ammunition purchases make me fear what our government is up to
    • Other




    Read more at Feds buying 100 years worth of ammo
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 03-11-2013 at 10:27 PM.
    Amnesty for 11 million will increase debt by $6.3 trillion And that doesn't count costs of 22 million additional legal immigrants in just 10 years!
    A Nation of of 3rd World Broke A@@es "AmeriKa" cannot afford an Invasion of Broke A@@es from the 3rd World

  2. #2
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
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    Should Obama cut down on ammo purchases rather than White House tours?

    • Yes, the massive ammunition purchases make me fear what our government is up to (76%, 91 Votes)
    • Yes, it seems to me the Founding Fathers warned against a 'standing army' (8%, 9 Votes)
    • Yes, the amount of money they're spending during federal budget cuts is ludicrous (4%, 5 Votes)
    • Yes, if the feds weren't buying so much ammunition, maybe Americans could get their hands on some (3%, 4 Votes)
    • Yes, especially since police and even Marines are now being told to ration ammunition (3%, 4 Votes)
    • Yes, why in the world do feds need five bullets for every person in the United States? (3%, 3 Votes)
    • Closing down the tours is a good first step. We should shut down the rest of the White House next (3%, 3 Votes)
    • No, the government needs to buy up ammunition to keep it out of the hands of kooks and murderers (0%, 0 Votes)
    • No, apparently you can still get a White House tour for a $500,000 donation (0%, 0 Votes)
    • No, it takes a lot of money to build up a civilian security force equal to the military (0%, 0 Votes)
    • No, the amount of ammunition being purchased is normal and seems reasonable (0%, 0 Votes)
    • No, Obama is doing the right thing by cutting back on White House tours (0%, 0 Votes)
    • No, the government needs ammunition to keep us safe (0%, 0 Votes)
    • Other (0%, 0 Votes)



    Total Voters: 119

    Vote


    Read more at Feds buying 100 years worth of ammo
    Amnesty for 11 million will increase debt by $6.3 trillion And that doesn't count costs of 22 million additional legal immigrants in just 10 years!
    A Nation of of 3rd World Broke A@@es "AmeriKa" cannot afford an Invasion of Broke A@@es from the 3rd World

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Newmexican's Avatar
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    Gun shops face massive ammunition shortage

    By Aaron Smith
    yMarch 12, 2013:

    Even .22-caliber bullets are in short supply, as gun lovers stock up on ammo.

    NEW YORK (CNNMoney)
    Gun enthusiasts are buying firearms with unparalleled zeal. As a result, ammunition is in short supply nationwide.

    "We can't get any inventory within a 100-mile radius," said Mark Campbell, owner of Mid America Arms in St. Louis. He's having a hard time keeping ammo in stock. "It started right around the election, as soon as President Obama mentioned gun control. But right after the school shooting in [Newtown] Connecticut, that's when it went crazy."

    Even the big ammunition retailers are feeling the pinch.Wal-Mart (WMT, Fortune 500) has been rationing its ammo since January, to three boxes per customer per day. And when a gun retailer like Cabela's (CAB)gets two or three shrink-wrapped pallets of 5.56 mm or .223 ammunition for AR-15 assault rifles, they're "cleaned off like locusts, within a couple of hours," according to Brian Rafn, a research director at Morgan Dempsey Capital Management in Milwaukee who follows ammo manufacturers.

    "You're talking about a massive civilian arsenal build up," he added.

    As demand has climbed, so have prices, from $12 for a box of 50 rounds for assault rifles to $25 a box, said Rafn.

    Ammunition manufacturers declined to comment on whether they've ramped up production, but Rafn expects that they have.

    "They're probably [working] three shifts, seven days a week plus overtime," Rafn says of manufacturers like Alliant Techsystems (ATK, Fortune 500), Olin (OLN), Winchester, Hornady Manufacturing and Remington. "They're probably scrambling to build new plants like they haven't done in eons."

    Anecdotal evidence certainly suggests they're busy.

    Related: Gun maker CEO: 'We're selling everything we make'

    The answering machine at Hornady Manufacturing in Grand Island, Neb., has an outgoing message that says "call volume, order volume and demand for product has increased dramatically," delaying bullet shipments to distributors.

    Caleb Ogilvie, a concealed-carry instructor who works at Cabot Gun & Ammo in Cabot, Ark., has heard from various employees at the nearby Remington ammunition plant in Lonoke that "they're running full swing up there, running 24-7."

    But Ogilvie said that it's tough to keep ammo on the shelves, despite his shop's proximity to the plant, a mere 15 miles away -- especially the once-ubiquitous .22-caliber.

    ".22 ammo, you cannot find anywhere right now," he said. "It's popular. It's cheap. People want to go out and target shoot. People just want to go out and plink."

    One gunshop worker was too busy with customers to even speak to CNNMoney. The man who answered the phone at Shootin' Shed Gun Shop in West Winfield, N.Y., said, "Sir, you're talking to the only [employee] in here and there's nine people standing in front of me."

    Related: Now online: Cheap ammo

    The recent sales activity comes even as one survey suggests a broader decline in gun ownership. A survey by researchers at the University of Chicago released last week found that 34% of adults owned guns last year, down from 49% in 1973.
    But respondents weren't asked how many guns they owned -- just whether they owned any. And much of the recent activity is not reflected in that survey: According to FBI data, seven of the 10 biggest weeks ever for background checks for guns have occurred in 2013.

    Industry experts and insiders say the congressional debate over gun control proposals, including background checks and a new assault weapons ban, is helping fuel sales now.

    As gun lovers buy up weapons that may be banned or restricted, shares of companies likeSturm Ruger (RGR) and Smith & Wesson (SWHC) which make assault rifles (but not ammunition) have skyrocketed.

    And if you haven't bought an assault rifle yet ... forget about it.

    "If you were going to order an AR-15, you're going to be waiting two years," said Ogilvie.
    Ammo disappears from gun shop shelves - Mar. 12, 2013



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