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  1. #1
    Senior Member steelerbabe's Avatar
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    Altering the Forces That Drive Illegal Immigration

    http://www.oregonlive.com/editorials/or ... xml&coll=7

    Altering the forces that drive illegal immigration
    Mexico's own initiatives boost the chances
    Friday, August 25, 2006
    that a Senate-House compromise could work

    T wo decades ago, the United States tried to repair its broken southern border unilaterally, without much help from the nation on the other side. The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 was hailed as a major step forward, but in hindsight it looks as effective as one hand clapping. The other hand, Mexico, remained folded.

    Poor, proud and embroiled in economic crisis, Mexico -- its leaders, anyway -- was in a state of denial. To acknowledge the northward flight of its population would have been to admit massive economic failure. Twenty years later, however, as pressure again mounts to repair the border, few Americans realize why it stands a better chance of working this time around: Mexico could be a full partner.

    As Geronimo Gutierrez Fernandez, undersecretary for foreign affairs, emphasized during a visit to Oregon this week, Mexico gets it. It is not only shouldering more responsibility for its far-flung migrant population, but it's also offering them new incentives to return home.

    Last year, Mexico expanded its low-cost health care program, known as Seguro Popular, to cover as many as 400,000 Mexican migrants living in the United States. It has ambitions to cover even more, Gutierrez said, and plans are in the works to provide a small budget to return injured migrants to Mexico by air ambulance. Obviously, this won't eliminate the need for emergency room visits, or come close to covering the millions of Mexican nationals who live in the United States. But in the long run, it moves in the right direction and could cut down on American hospital costs.

    Most of the push-and-pull factors that drive illegal immigration aren't entirely within the control of either nation, of course. But one innovation Mexico is pursuing that can't hurt is the transnational or binational mortgage, Gutierrez said. This gives immigrants working in the United States a chance to simultaneously buy a house in Mexico.

    In the past, many illegal workers have found a way to build small homes in Mexico without help from banks or mortgages, sometimes wiring money directly to cement makers to pour the foundations. But banks are now waking up to this opportunity. Even if these workers' accounts are fairly modest, banks are recognizing that this customer base is extremely dependable. Most Latinos, even those here illegally, send home money faithfully to their families. A 2004 study showed that most workers send, on average, $240 a month, which adds up in Mexico to $20 billion a year.

    Right now, of course, Mexico's economy is surging. That beats any fence as the best way to prevent illegal immigration. A "get tough" border crackdown, like the one favored by the U.S. House of Representatives, actually could backfire by further "locking in" this nation's 12 million illegal immigrants. Instead of motivating them to come forward, it could mostly discourage them from returning home because they fear they'll never get back in.

    What Mexico and the United States should be doing, instead, is normalizing travel, encouraging "circularity" in the system and capitalizing on immigrants' own ties to their home country. A Senate bill, favored by President Bush, would do just this, offering incentives for the illegal population to come forward, instead of just going underground and disappearing.

    Mexico's initiatives are only starts in the right direction, but they synchronize well with the president's approach, and also with the pushes and pulls of human nature. If the Senate and House are able to reach agreement in 2006, we have a real chance to fix our nation's southern border.

    Our neighbor to the south is ready to help. We shouldn't turn down that offer.

  2. #2
    Senior Member swatchick's Avatar
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    Mexico's Economy

    Is it booming only due to their own economy or does it include the money illegals send home? If it is their own economy, then why are all these Mexicans leaving and Elivra does not want to return home. I think many of the illegal men are running from the law or others who are a threat to them. Lately there has been numerous illegals caught at border points who were indeed criminals or drug runners.
    All those Latin American countries where we get illegals from need stable governments without the corruption that exists at present. The leaders of many of those countries are rich and only care about their own wealth and power. Their military and police departments are abused by the government for their own gain. If the corruption was gone and politicians really cared about their country and its economy, we would not be in the situation we are in with all the illegals.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  3. #3
    Senior Member WavTek's Avatar
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    Right now, of course, Mexico's economy is surging. That beats any fence as the best way to prevent illegal immigration. A "get tough" border crackdown, like the one favored by the U.S. House of Representatives, actually could backfire by further "locking in" this nation's 12 million illegal immigrants. Instead of motivating them to come forward, it could mostly discourage them from returning home because they fear they'll never get back in.
    This arguement makes absolutely no sense to me. If they are afraid to go home, because they might not be able to get back in the U.S., then they had no intention of staying in their home country anyway. They simply want to go back for a visit, then return to the U.S.

    As far as I know, we don't make illegal aliens who want to return to their countries, stay here. They can leave anytime they like.
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