Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

  1. #1
    Senior Member cvangel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    4,450

    California voter rolls 1 million lighter

    I wonder how much lighter they would be if California actually made an effort to make sure voters in this state were really citizens? I'd love to see that happen, then the liberal agenda in this state wouldn't hold so much electoral power!

    State voter rolls 1 million lighter
    By Judy Lin - Bee Capitol Bureau

    Last Updated 12:21 am PDT Tuesday, March 13, 2007
    Story appeared in MAIN NEWS section, Page A6

    There are nearly 1 million fewer Californians registered to vote compared with two years ago, according to the secretary of state's latest registration report.

    Of 22 million eligible voters, California had 16.6 million people, or 74 percent, register in 2005, compared with 15.7 million, or 69 percent, this year.

    The report, issued every odd-numbered year, reflects newly registered voters and removes people who have died, moved out of state or become ineligible to vote.

    While the drop has happened before -- the state had 410,000 fewer registrants in 2003 than it did in 2001, for example -- Secretary of State Debra Bowen is worried about the drop and says the state should invest in public education.

    "Part of the drop in registration numbers can be attributed to better tracking and the removal of so-called 'deadwood' from the rolls, but the state's population is continuing to grow, and the number of registered voters isn't," Bowen said.

    http://www.sacbee.com/111/story/136856.html

  2. #2
    Senior Member gofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,728
    People are FLEEING the invasion! It should be obvious!

  3. #3
    Senior Member CountFloyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Occupied Territories, Alta Mexico
    Posts
    3,008
    Secretary of State Debra Bowen is worried about the drop and says the state should invest in public education.
    See the problem we have here in California.

    The number of registered voters has decreased, so it follows that we must spend more on the government schools. On the bright side, at least she didn't say it shows why we need comprehensive immigration reform.

    It's all so simple.
    It's like hell vomited and the Bush administration appeared.

  4. #4
    Senior Member cvangel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    4,450
    Quote Originally Posted by CountFloyd
    Secretary of State Debra Bowen is worried about the drop and says the state should invest in public education.
    See the problem we have here in California.

    The number of registered voters has decreased, so it follows that we must spend more on the government schools. On the bright side, at least she didn't say it shows why we need comprehensive immigration reform.

    It's all so simple.
    Add to that another way to feed the coffers of the all powerful Teacher's Union here!

  5. #5
    Administrator ALIPAC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Gheen, Minnesota, United States
    Posts
    66,907
    Quote Originally Posted by gofer
    People are FLEEING the invasion! It should be obvious!
    Exactly! People that are American citizens, taxpayers, and voters are leaving California in droves as the illegal aliens brought in by Bush Corp. swamp the state!

    W
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  6. #6
    Senior Member ShockedinCalifornia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,901
    Or you could suggest that many immigrants in California are voting in Mexico's elections not ours.

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    was Georgia - now Arizona
    Posts
    4,477
    The population is rising but registered voters are declining. I would hazard a guess that citizens are bailing out while illegal aliens are pouring in. Seems like that much should be obvious to ANYONE.

  8. #8
    Senior Member reptile09's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    El Cajon, Mexifornia
    Posts
    1,401
    I see the flight everywhere, legal families are fleeing San Diego for places where the people still speak English. The schools and hospitals are being over run by Mexicans, not to mention the huge increases in crime and gang violence since the invasion has started, whcih coincidentally has occured since Bush has been in office. What a shock.

    We are being inundated with a huge influx of outright Mexican Nationals along with the masses of Mexican illegals. More and more cars are driving around my hometown with Mexico license plates everyday. Pretty soon there will be as many cars with Mexico license plates as cars with CA license plates. And of course none of these people have CA drivers' licenses, liability insurance or even bother to have CA registration or obey CA smog requirements, let alone obey the traffic laws, street signs or traffic signals. They blow through stop signs at will, use carpool lanes when alone in their cars and commit massive numbers of DUI and hit & run accidents, almost always fleeing on foot after killing and maiming innocent residents.
    [b][i][size=117]"Leave like beaten rats. You old white people. It is your duty to die. Through love of having children, we are going to take over.â€

  9. #9
    Senior Member SOSADFORUS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    IDAHO
    Posts
    19,570
    Quote Originally Posted by ALIPAC
    Quote Originally Posted by gofer
    People are FLEEING the invasion! It should be obvious!
    Exactly! People that are American citizens, taxpayers, and voters are leaving California in droves as the illegal aliens brought in by Bush Corp. swamp the state!

    W
    Exactly, and we know the people that do not register to vote are the uneducated, so good indication as to whats happening to Calif.

    Wonder when real estate going to go to h__, we know people making the wages most of these people do can not afford a 2 bedroom house for $600,000. Smart ones are selling and getting out!!
    Please support ALIPAC's fight to save American Jobs & Lives from illegal immigration by joining our free Activists E-Mail Alerts (CLICK HERE)

  10. #10
    Senior Member cvangel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    4,450
    Quote Originally Posted by ALIPAC
    Exactly! People that are American citizens, taxpayers, and voters are leaving California in droves as the illegal aliens brought in by Bush Corp. swamp the state!
    W
    Here's a related aspect of this story. Can anyone deny what California politicians are trying to do in manipulating the vote? If Amnesty passes we are lost! This state carries so much electoral power it would create a dangerous situation for Americans!

    Legislature Approves Early ‘08 Primary for California
    Opponents say moving primary is smoke screen for removing term limits
    By SAMANTHA YOUNG, Associated Press Writer
    Published: March 7, 2007

    SACRAMENTO (AP) - The California Legislature on Tuesday sought to give the nation’s most populous state a greater voice in the race for the White House by moving the state’s presidential primary from June to February.

    The Assembly approved the bill 46-28, along party lines, and sent it to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who has said he supports the concept.

    The effort to move the primary has been cast by its supporters as an attempt to force presidential candidates to campaign in California, rather than merely coming to the state to raise money.

    “We need to do this because as long as I can remember California is basically an ATM for presidential candidates,” Assembly Charles M. Calderon, D-Whittier, said during the Assembly debate.

    “California is an important state in this union, and we need to be involved in who the next president of the United States is.”

    The assemblyman’s brother, Sen. Ron Calderon, D-Monterey Park, wrote the early primary bill. The Senate passed the bill last month on a 31-5 vote.

    Opponents said moving the primary to February is merely a smoke screen for the personal agendas of lawmakers who want to extend their terms. A proposed measure that would go on a February ballot would allow legislators to serve longer in their respective houses.

    “It’s about termed-out legislators getting one more bite at the apple to extend their time here,” said Assemblyman Doug La Malfa, R-Willows.

    Republicans, who are in the minority in the 80-seat chamber, opposed the measure because it does not guarantee funding for counties that would administer the additional election. A third election is expected to cost California taxpayers an additional $60 million to $90 million.

    They tried to amend the bill to require reimbursement from the state, but the effort failed.

    Even with the state’s presidential primary in February, elections for state and congressional candidates would continue to be held in June, with the general election in November.

    Schwarzenegger, who is supportive of an early presidential primary, is waiting to see the final bill before deciding whether to sign it, his spokesman said.

    “He supports moving the California primary up so we can be more relevant in the presidential primary,” Schwarzenegger spokesman Aaron McLear said before Tuesday’s vote. “As it stands now, California is an afterthought. They come here just for our money.”

    Feb. 5 is shaping into a new “Super Tuesday,” with more than a dozen states considering moving their primaries to that day. Primaries in New Hampshire and South Carolina, as well as caucuses in Iowa and Nevada are scheduled before Feb. 5.

    Political analysts differ over how California’s early presidential primary might affect the 2008 campaign.

    The state’s influence could be diluted with so many other states considering moving their primaries to February. But the election also could lure candidates who want to win the state with the greatest number of electoral votes, giving them a strategic advantage to secure their party’s nomination.

    The one thing that seems certain is that candidates now will have to spend a lot more money much earlier than they had anticipated. California’s sheer size requires candidates to reach voters by television, costing millions of dollars.

    “It will cause these campaign operatives a lot of heartburn when California moves to the fifth because they are going to have to rethink their whole strategy for the election,” said Tim Storey, an elections analyst with the National Conference of State Legislatures. “You can’t ignore California. It really does change the dynamics.”

    Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez said the earlier primary will give California a more prominent platform among the candidates.

    “Gone will be the days when California voters are sidelined,” said Nunez, D-Los Angeles. “Californians will have the opportunity to look at the candidates square in the eye and say, ‘Where do you stand on the issues that I, as a voter, care about?’”

    The leading candidates already have begun campaigning in California, in a seemingly constant parade over the past two weeks.

    Democratic candidates Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barack Obama and John Edwards have campaigned in Los Angeles, Fresno and Berkeley. Republicans Rudy Giuliani and John McCain have appeared alongside Schwarzenegger.

    Democratic supporters of the bill noted that California receives just 79 cents from the federal government for every dollar it contributes in taxes. That equation could change if the state had a larger role in selecting the president, they said.

    “Just the talk of changing the date of the primary has made a big difference,” Assemblywoman Karen Bass, D-Los Angeles, said before Tuesday’s vote. “They were always in Los Angeles, but only the rich had an opportunity to see them at all because of fundraisers.”

    California has tried earlier primaries before, but each time _ in 1996, 2000 and 2004 _ the entire election was moved to March. The state did not hold three elections in those years.

    A February election next year also could benefit lawmakers, most notably legislative leaders Nunez and state Sen. Don Perata, D-Oakland.

    A proposed ballot initiative would enable lawmakers who are now scheduled to be termed out next year to run for one more four-year term in the Senate and up to three additional two-year terms in the Assembly.

    If voters approve a modification of the state’s term-limit law next February, current lawmakers would be able to run again for their seats in June’s regularly scheduled primary.

    Schwarzenegger also wants a measure on the February ballot taking away the Legislature’s power to draw legislative and congressional districts.

    Nunez denied any self interest in pushing for an earlier presidential primary election that also would include the ballot measure seeking to extend his own term as speaker.

    He said the primary election for legislative and congressional offices would remain in June to give voters certainty about elections that happen every two years.

    “We did not want to use this experiment to get California the early presidential (primary) mixed up with the ability to increase voter turnout and have consistent voter turnout in June and then November,” Nunez said.

    ___

    On the Net:

    Read the bill SB 113 at http://www.sen.ca.gov

    http://www.sacunion.com/pages/state_...articles/8841/

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •