Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

  1. #1
    Administrator Jean's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    65,433

    Judge: L.A. was sneaky with living wage law

    This may not appear to be re illegal immigration but it's common knowledge most the hotel workers around LAX are probably illegals. A judge got something right in this case.

    ~~~~
    Updated Saturday, May 05, 2007
    Judge: L.A. was sneaky with living wage law
    In nixing the ordinance, court says City Council acted "in bad faith" with LAX hotels on pay deal that evaded a public referendum.
    By Kerry Cavanaugh
    Staff Writer

    A judge on Friday struck down the living-wage ordinance imposed on hotels near LAX, ruling that the Los Angeles City Council violated state law and acted in bad faith when it adopted the measure.

    In a strongly worded ruling, Superior Court Judge David P. Yaffe said the council tried to evade the state's referendum law after hotels and business groups gathered enough signatures to put the living-wage measure to a public vote.

    Although the council repealed the ordinance in face of the challenge, Yaffe said, it turned around and adopted virtually the same law a few weeks later.

    "Based on a comparison of the language in the old and new ordinances, the latter was enacted in bad faith with the intent to evade the effect of the referendum petition," Yaffe wrote in his ruling.

    The ruling marked a major setback for the council and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who worked with the city's powerful unions to craft the controversial living-wage ordinance.

    "The judge's decision is shocking to me, and I expect the city attorney to appeal," said Councilwoman Janice Hahn, who helped push for the law. "We should stop at nothing to ensure that the hotel workers along the Century Corridor are treated with dignity and respect. These men and women are the faces of Los Angeles hospitality to visitors to our city every day."

    City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo's office said he is considering the city's options and an aide to Villaraigosa said the mayor will review the decision.

    "The mayor believes that the workers at the Century Corridor hotels deserve a decent living wage. He will be working with the City Council to review the options going forward," said Parita Shah, a spokeswoman for Villaraigosa.

    Los Angeles has had a living-wage requirement for more than a decade, but it had been applied only to firms doing direct business with the city.

    In expanding it to the hotels, the council argued that the facilities benefit from their proximity to Los Angeles International Airport and its city-funded improvements, so could be required to pay higher wages.

    The living-wage law, first adopted in November, required 13 hotels along Century Boulevard to increase workers' hourly pay to $9.39 with health insurance, or $10.64 without health benefits.

    But hotels and business groups vigorously fought back, saying the city has no right to set wages for private-sector workers. They also worried that the law could set a precedent and lead to similar ordinances applied to other industries.


    The Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce teamed up with hotels and spent $800,000 to gather more than 103,000 signatures to put the ordinance on the May ballot with the hope that voters would overturn the law.

    Officials estimated that a referendum could have cost the city and business community as much as $15 million. To head off an expensive election, the City Council pledged to repeal the ordinance if the hotels agreed to a compromise that would include dropping the referendum.

    The council repealed the law in late January and two weeks later adopted a new measure that kept the living-wage requirements but also promised $1 million in street improvements in the area and $50,000 to develop a marketing plan for a new Airport Hospitality Enhancement Zone.

    The new measure contained language designed to limit the expansion of the living wage to other business sectors. It also called for studies into a possible conference center and business-tax reductions for the area, as well as various studies on the impact of the living wage.

    But the new measure still frustrated business and hotel groups, who filed suit.

    In his ruling, the judge said enhancements that the council added to the measure were largely "illusory" and "vague commitments."

    "These commitments are not sufficient to materially change the ordinance that the people demonstrated their hostility to by exercising their power of referendum," Yaffe wrote.

    Councilmen Dennis Zine, Bernard Parks and Greig Smith had opposed the new ordinance, calling it a bait-and-switch.

    "The judge's ruling is exactly what we said," Smith said Friday. "I'd be aghast if they appeal it because they're going to lose again."

    But community organizers who helped draft the living-wage law disagreed strongly with the judge's ruling, saying they plan to keep fighting for higher pay for the nearly 3,500 hotel workers.

    "It's disappointing to see the hotels continue to fight their workers," said James Elmendorf, senior policy analyst for the Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy.

    But Harvey Englander, who represents the Century Corridor hotels, said the City Council and mayor never should have moved forward with the second ordinance.


    "This now creates an opportunity -- it's a cooling-off period," Englander said. "The council could bring this back in a year. We're hoping to show the council that there is not a reason to."

    http://www.dailybreeze.com/news/articles/7349991.html
    Support our FIGHT AGAINST illegal immigration & Amnesty by joining our E-mail Alerts at https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

  2. #2
    Senior Member pjr40's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Redlands, California
    Posts
    1,596
    The ruling marked a major setback for the council and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who worked with the city's powerful unions to craft the controversial living-wage ordinance.
    Yeah, the mayor wanted to give all the illegal hotel workers a raise so they could settle in forever in LA. They could also vote for the mayor when he runs for governor in 2008.
    <div>Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of congress; but I repeat myself. Mark Twain</div>

  3. #3
    Senior Member mkfarnam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma (formerly So, California)
    Posts
    4,208
    Of course he does. After all he`s a former leader of MechA.
    ------------------------

  4. #4
    Senior Member swatchick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Miami, Florida
    Posts
    5,230
    Miami Dade and Broward Counties have a living wage clause for all contractors they do business with.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    12,855
    "The judge's decision is shocking to me, and I expect the city attorney to appeal," said Councilwoman Janice Hahn, who helped push for the law. "We should stop at nothing to ensure that the hotel workers along the Century Corridor are treated with dignity and respect. These men and women are the faces of Los Angeles hospitality to visitors to our city every day."
    We should stop at nothing to ensure that the hotel workers WHO ARE ILLEGAL ARE SENT BACK TO THEIR RESPECTIVE HOME NATIONS!!

    Try upholding the LAW first.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  6. #6
    Senior Member gofer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,728
    Terry Anderson said that it was virtually impossible for a black person to get a job in janitorial or fast food. They are told they don't speak the language of the kitchen. All these jobs have been taken from blacks and given to Hispanics over the years. Several years back these same jobs paid around 11 bucks an hour.....you can see how low it is now. Terry was on the Rush Limbaugh show last week.....for those who don't know, Terry is a black talk show host in L.A.

  7. #7
    Senior Member swatchick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Miami, Florida
    Posts
    5,230
    Gofer there is an African American in Miami who has seen what giving jobs to illegals has done in his community. He has become very vocal about it and they actually wrote about him and the situation in the Miami Herald. I hate to say this but personally I think alot of the shootings of people in areas where there are alot of illegals is due to this. The kids are getting into gangs and/or selling drugs to support families. If the jobs aren't there they will resort to other things to survive. They don't have the option of running to another country, stealing those peoples jobs and using their social services to survive.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •