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  1. #1
    Senior Member mapwife's Avatar
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    Mexico plants unable to tap migrant flood heading north

    Mexico plants unable to tap migrant flood heading north

    Chris Hawley
    Republic Mexico City Bureau
    Nov. 4, 2006 12:00 AM


    MEXICO CITY - Factories on the Mexican side of the border are battling a labor shortage and say they have failed miserably in their attempts to hire some of the thousands of migrants flowing toward the United States.

    Companies in Nogales, Juarez, Reynosa and other border cities are sending recruiters hundreds of miles to hunt for workers in southern Mexico. Many are offering signing bonuses, housing and even free lunches to lure employees.

    "There just aren't enough workers here," said Abel Anaya, manager of the Weiser Lock plant in Nogales, Sonora, on the Arizona border.

    Weiser Lock has sent recruiters to Chiapas, a Mexican state 1,400 miles away, and to Veracruz state, on the Atlantic Ocean. About 150 of the plant's 600 employees are from out of state, he said.

    Most migrants turn up their noses at Mexican factory jobs, which typically pay unskilled workers less than 120 pesos ($11.30) a day. Migrants know that they can earn five or six times as much just across the border in the United States. Mexican companies say they can't afford to raise their wages because they are competing with assembly plants in China and India, where the pay is even lower.

    In June, Mexican President Vicente Fox estimated the labor shortage on the border at 100,000 workers. John Christman, an expert on Mexican manufacturing with the Global Insight consulting firm, said the crunch has eased somewhat since then, as assembly plants known as maquiladoras enter their slowest time of the year. But the shortage is still about 60,000 workers, he said.

    Juarez alone needs 10,000 factory workers, said Jorge Pedrosa, director of the local maquiladora association. Tijuana needs 4,000 to 5,000, according to Luis Alberto Pelayo, his counterpart in that city.

    Some factories have had to turn down contracts because they cannot keep up with the workload, they said.

    In many places, Mexican companies have launched programs to recruit some of the hundreds of migrants deported daily by U.S. authorities.

    Nogales is a prime example. The city lies in the middle of the most popular corridor for Mexicans headed illegally to the United States. The U.S. Border Patrol's Tucson Sector made more than 380,000 arrests from Oct. 1, 2005 to Sept. 15.

    Most of the detainees are put onto buses and released just across the border, in downtown Nogales.

    During the peak summer season, when factories in Nogales were struggling to fill 2,000 openings, company recruiters and state employment officials greeted the buses.

    Migrants were offered a month of free room and board if they would take jobs on the Mexican side, said Jesus Montoya, executive director of the Sonora Maquiladora Association.

    Only about 300 migrants accepted. Most of the others planned to cross the border again, Montoya said.

    "We talked with them, we offered them work, we offered them dormitories, and the response was absolutely minimal," said Mario Echeverrķa, human resources manager for Sonitronies, a staffing company in Nogales, Sonora.

    But part of the problem is that Mexican maquiladoras increasingly need skilled workers, which are harder to find, company officials say.

    During the 2000-01 economic slump, many U.S. companies moved manual factory work, such as clothing manufacturing, from Mexico to China to cut costs.

    Mexican factories became more automated, creating a demand for machinery operators, computer technicians and engineers.

    "The people who are repatriated don't fall within the profile we are looking for," said Arnulfo Castro, personnel manager for Columbus Industries, a maker of air filters in Juarez.

    Because factories are having to do more training, many are offering bonuses to new hires who stay for three months, and another bonus if they stay for a year, Castro said.

    At the same time, they are turning away people who don't have high school diplomas or who cannot pass basic math and reading tests.

    "Mexico's problem is not creating jobs, it's having trained people to occupy those jobs," President Fox told The Republic during an interview in June. "Education, teaching and training will become vital to fill those jobs."

    http://www.azcentral.com/php-bin/clickt ... s1104.html
    Illegal aliens remain exempt from American laws, while they DEMAND American rights...

  2. #2
    Senior Member loservillelabor's Avatar
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    "Mexico's problem is not creating jobs, it's having trained people to occupy those jobs," President Fox told The Republic during an interview in June. "Education, teaching and training will become vital to fill those jobs."
    Try and hold on a little longer Vincente. We've got a bunch of them trained up. We'll be sending them home soon.
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    MW
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    "There just aren't enough workers here," said Abel Anaya, manager of the Weiser Lock plant in Nogales, Sonora, on the Arizona border.
    That's because they are all over here you idiot!

    "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing" ** Edmund Burke**

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    Next they will be saying they have to hire South Americans to do the jobs the Mexican's won't do.

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    Senior Member gofer's Avatar
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    GM was paying 3.50 an hour in Mexico and from my understanding that's a good wage, but the problem is you got to be able to read and write. I read, on a blog, that a man was living pretty good on 350.00 a month. If you notice you don't hear too many stories from people "starving". It's always about getting money to "build a house." etc.

    When you get 35-40 year old career hamburger flippers, the young people are shoved out of part-time jobs. The local McDonalds used to be all smiley- faced, teenage black and white kids.....now it's all 30-50 year old hispanics. The same goes for Jack in the Box and Wendys. The icon of the teenage fast-food worker is gone.

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    Senior Member gofer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ConcernedCitizen
    Next they will be saying they have to hire South Americans to do the jobs the Mexican's won't do.
    They already do!! They hire Guatamalians to work the coffee plantations because they don't pay enough for Mexicans! It's something like 2-3 bucks a day!

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    Senior Member loservillelabor's Avatar
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    This is worth posting again for those that missed it. Enjoy

    Upwards of 1 million Mexicans are successfully crossing into the US each year, leaving behind a dearth of laborers. Increasingly, that void is being filled by people like Santiago - poor Indians from remote villages throughout Mexico.

    "Our workforce has left," says Tomas Torres, the general secretary of Zacatecas. "So these other people come here, lured by the high demand for seasonal labor. But then they decide to stay."

    In no part of Mexico is this situation more evident than in Zacatecas. It has the highest per-capita emigration rate of any Mexican state - an astounding 1 of every 2 Zacatecans are estimated to reside in the US. That opens the door to migrants who come from poor Indian towns in states like Veracruz, Hidalgo Durango, Jalisco, and San Luis Potosi.

    "In the last six years, many more people have come from other states to work here," says Laura Macias, a radio reporter in Tlatenango, in the fertile south of Zacatecas. "They come to work, but they stay and cause problems."

    According to Ms. Macias, the laborers, largely Huichol Indians from neighboring states Jalisco and Nayarit, have increasingly been accused of thefts, assaults, and even murders in the normally quiet community. The accusations have led to hard feelings toward the newcomers, and tensions in Tlaltenango are on the rise. But, Macias admits, it's proven hard to link crimes directly to any of the Huichols, and she wonders if part of the problem isn't that "locals are resentful that outsiders are earning money in their town."

    Then there's the culture shock. "These people are trading in their traditional Indian clothing for Nike tennis shoes and Yankees hats," says Torres. "Sometimes they arrive and they don't even speak Spanish. And they end up begging in the streets."

    http://www.diggersrealm.com/mt/archives/000211.html
    http://www.alipac.us/ftopicp-128544.html
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  8. #8
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    This is nothing new I have heard complaints from Mexicans who had bussinesses and were unable to find help twenty years ago due to the fact that all the young people wanted to do was cross the border and make the big bucks.
    The older mexicans knew this was going to ruin their country, how can any country survive when it's greatest export is it's young people?
    What kind of a future will a country have when it's young people refuse to stay and learn a trade and instead leave their homes to go work in a field often leaving their family behind.
    It seems like self destruction to me
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    Senior Member 31scout's Avatar
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    According to Ms. Macias, the laborers, largely Huichol Indians from neighboring states Jalisco and Nayarit, have increasingly been accused of thefts, assaults, and even murders in the normally quiet community.
    You mean there's a group of people in Mexico that steal, assault and murder at a higher rate than the ridiculously high rate of the regular citizens?????
    Oh, yeah, we need to bring them here, we have prison beds we need to fill.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member fedupinwaukegan's Avatar
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    Yep, we have had two Mexican villages, La Puerta and Tonatico (this was even reported by one of the Washington DC papers!) transport themselves into our town....
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