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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 1970
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    185

    An often-crossed line in the sand

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7112292/

    Upgraded border security does little to halt illegal immigration
    LAS CHEPAS, Mexico - An ancient blue school bus pulled up at Erlinda Juarez Martinez's house one recent afternoon, and 20 poor farmers wearing jeans and baseball caps hopped off. They had traveled for days to reach this village of crumbling adobe homes, separated from the United States by nothing but a few strands of barbed wire and a dirty desert breeze.
    Every hour, mud-caked buses and pickup trucks dropped off other new loads of travelers, their backpacks filled with tortillas and toilet paper, their heads filled with dreams of America. For them, Las Chepas was a locker room of illegal immigration, a place to find food, water, traveling companions and a guide.
    Hope on the 'other side'
    One of the men on the porch was Jesus Alonzo Camacho, 44. He and six friends had left home in Michoacan state, where they earn about $6 a day working in the fields. "We can't support ourselves at home; we need the money from the other side," Camacho said. His only plan was to slip across the border and walk north until he found someone to give him work. "Anyone," he said. "Anywhere."



    Facing Camacho and the others across a nearby ditch was an astounding high-tech spiderweb spun by the U.S. Border Patrol in New Mexico. Motion sensors were buried in the ground. High-resolution infrared cameras were mounted on poles, able to spot people five miles off. A man hiding in the dark would pop up larger than life on video monitors 35 miles away, so detailed that technicians could see him sneeze.
    On the ground, agents in big sport-utility vehicles were armed with night-vision goggles and satellite global positioning devices. Helicopters buzzed up and down the border, shining powerful spotlights. U.S. Army units preparing to head for Iraq were holding exercises here, too, catching illegal immigrants with precision surveillance equipment designed for war.

    Every day of the year, such high-tech barricades help U.S. authorities catch more than 3,000 people along the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border. Yet despite the unprecedented investment in technology and manpower, illegal immigrants are still coming in waves â€
    If you do not drive out the inhabitants of the land, those you allow to remain will give you trouble in the land where you will live.'

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    185

    An often-crossed line in the sand

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7112292/

    Upgraded border security does little to halt illegal immigration
    LAS CHEPAS, Mexico - An ancient blue school bus pulled up at Erlinda Juarez Martinez's house one recent afternoon, and 20 poor farmers wearing jeans and baseball caps hopped off. They had traveled for days to reach this village of crumbling adobe homes, separated from the United States by nothing but a few strands of barbed wire and a dirty desert breeze.
    Every hour, mud-caked buses and pickup trucks dropped off other new loads of travelers, their backpacks filled with tortillas and toilet paper, their heads filled with dreams of America. For them, Las Chepas was a locker room of illegal immigration, a place to find food, water, traveling companions and a guide.
    Hope on the 'other side'
    One of the men on the porch was Jesus Alonzo Camacho, 44. He and six friends had left home in Michoacan state, where they earn about $6 a day working in the fields. "We can't support ourselves at home; we need the money from the other side," Camacho said. His only plan was to slip across the border and walk north until he found someone to give him work. "Anyone," he said. "Anywhere."



    Facing Camacho and the others across a nearby ditch was an astounding high-tech spiderweb spun by the U.S. Border Patrol in New Mexico. Motion sensors were buried in the ground. High-resolution infrared cameras were mounted on poles, able to spot people five miles off. A man hiding in the dark would pop up larger than life on video monitors 35 miles away, so detailed that technicians could see him sneeze.
    On the ground, agents in big sport-utility vehicles were armed with night-vision goggles and satellite global positioning devices. Helicopters buzzed up and down the border, shining powerful spotlights. U.S. Army units preparing to head for Iraq were holding exercises here, too, catching illegal immigrants with precision surveillance equipment designed for war.

    Every day of the year, such high-tech barricades help U.S. authorities catch more than 3,000 people along the 2,000-mile U.S.-Mexico border. Yet despite the unprecedented investment in technology and manpower, illegal immigrants are still coming in waves â€
    If you do not drive out the inhabitants of the land, those you allow to remain will give you trouble in the land where you will live.'

  3. #3
    gp
    gp is offline
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    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    166
    we will never,ever stop the invasion, if the employers are aloud to employ them.....NO MATTER HOW MUCH MONEY WE SPEND!!!!!!!!!!

  4. #4
    gp
    gp is offline
    gp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Posts
    166
    we will never,ever stop the invasion, if the employers are aloud to employ them.....NO MATTER HOW MUCH MONEY WE SPEND!!!!!!!!!!

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