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    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    America has a massive truck driver shortage. Here's why few want an $80,000 job

    America has a massive truck driver shortage. Here's why few want an $80,000 job.

    BY HEATHER LONG
    The Washington Post
    May 30, 2018 01:28 AM
    Updated May 30, 2018 11:50 AM

    America has a massive shortage of truck drivers. Joyce Brenny, head of Brenny Transportation in Minnesota, increased driver pay 15 percent this year to try to attract more drivers. Many of her drivers now earn $80,000, she says, yet she still can’t find enough people for the job.

    About 51,000 more drivers are needed to meet the demand from companies such as Amazon and Walmart that are shipping more goods across the country, according to the American Trucking Associations. The driver shortage is already leading to delayed deliveries and higher prices for goods that Americans buy. The ATA predicts that it’s likely to get worse in the coming years.


    Many trucking companies are so desperate for drivers that they are offering signing bonuses and pay raises. So why don’t more Americans want this job? We asked truck drivers who have been doing the job anywhere from four months to 40 years for their views.


    Most said the answer is simple: The lifestyle is rough. You barely see your family, you rarely shower, and you get little respect from car drivers, police or major retailers.

    Michael Dow said he has been divorced twice because of trucking. Donna Penland said she gained 60 pounds her first year from sitting all day and a lack of healthful food on the road.


    A few drivers told The Washington Post that they earn $100,000, but many said their annual pay is less than $50,000 (government statistics say median pay for the industry is $42,000). As for the bonuses, driver Daniel Gollnick said they are a “complete joke” because of all the strings attached.

    Despite the hardships, half said they would recommend the job to friends and family, chiefly because, as Gollnick said, “it’s the easiest money you can get without a college degree.” Here are the drivers’ perspectives on America’s trucking crisis.


    Twice divorced


    “I have been divorced two times because of truck driving.” - Michael Dow

    Michael Dow of Dallas has been a truck driver for more than two decades. He and his brother started a company, Dow Brothers Transportation, this year.

    They hope it will more than double their pay from prior years.


    Age: 48

    Yearly income: $45,000
    Why don’t people want this job? “The pay is so far behind the curve. I make less money now than I did 20 years ago if you adjust for inflation and cost of living. I figured it out once, and I was making $14 or $15 an hour driving for the big carriers. People flipping hamburgers are demanding $15 an hour.”

    Have you gotten a raise? “I have, because I went out and started my own company this year. The rates have never been this good in over 20 years. I hope the driver shortage continues. Skilled drivers like me aren’t cheap right now. I’m anticipating I’ll make $85,000 to $120,000 this year.”


    Would you recommend this job? “I have a 21-year-old son in the military who is about ready to come out. In all honesty, I do not wish him to get into this industry because it’s a hard life. I don’t recommend it to anyone who has a family. My kids are in their 20s now. I missed most of their lives growing up.

    They tell me they wish I would have been home more. I have been divorced two times because of truck driving. For a real perspective, talk to a trucker’s wife.”


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    Not enough pay

    “I see those ads for big driver bonuses, but it’s a complete joke.” - Daniel Gollnick
    Daniel Gollnick of Melrose, Wis., drives for a company that has him home each night. He used to drive a flatbed truck across the country, but his girlfriend didn’t like him being away so much.

    Age: 28

    Yearly income: $45,000
    Did you get a raise lately? “We got a $1 raise this year. We were at $17.50 an hour for most drivers.

    Now we’re at $18.50. That barely covers inflation or anything. I see those ads for big driver bonuses, but it’s a complete joke. I’ve worked for a couple of major trucking companies: Roehl Transport and Melton Truck Lines. Both offered sign-on bonuses, but what they don’t tell you is what it’s dependent upon to get that $1,000.

    Sometimes you needed to have certifications to deal with hazmat or be qualified to drive on military bases or ports.

    And you need to meet fuel-usage requirements, but they usually give you the oldest trucks that are least likely to get the sign-on bonuses because they use more fuel.”


    Would you recommend this job? “I do. I tell friends who are working minimum-wage or factory jobs to go get their CDL [Commercial Driver’s License, which takes a few weeks]. It’s the easiest money you can get without a college degree, but it’s a hard industry. You’re going to be alone a lot.”


    Is the industry in a crisis? “There are not enough truckers. I’ve been running around doing extra runs, because we are shorthanded. But I’ve noticed I’m not truly picking up more physical freight. I’m just picking up at more places.”


    Not exactly healthy


    “I gained 60 pounds because it’s a sedentary life.” - Donna Penland

    Donna Penland of Houston decided to get her CDL 18 months ago after her boyfriend was laid off from his job and wanted to try trucking. The duo “team-drove” a truck, meaning they would trade off driving so the vehicle would be on the road almost 24 hours a day. They eventually broke up, but Penland continued driving on her own.


    Age: 50

    Yearly income: “$50,000 is where you’re going to be when you work for a big company. If you want to make more money than that, you have to find an independent person with two or three trucks that really does appreciate you as a driver and they share profits with you.”

    Have you received a raise? “I work for Martin Transportation now. They don’t offer signing bonuses, but I work on a Coca-Cola dedicated route, and Coke is putting up bonuses because they need drivers. So I got a $3,500 signing bonus. But they don’t just give you $3,500. I received $500 after 30 days and another $1,000 after 60 days. They spread it out.”


    Would you recommend this job? “No. Not to most of my friends. It takes a special kind of person, because you basically give up your life for the job.

    You are dedicated to that truck. Most people are ‘over the road’ drivers, because that is where you make the most money. It means you go coast to coast and border to border. You are supposed to get a day off after every seven days of driving, but companies prefer that you stay out 60 days and then take just a few days off. I gained 60 pounds because it’s a sedentary life. You just drive, sleep, drive, sleep. Companies don’t treat you like a human. You are a just a machine that makes money for them.”


    Is this a good job for women? “I think it is a good profession for women, but there are a lot of doors to break down. The guys treat you like you’re stupid and don’t know anything. And companies are almost always asking you to do stuff that’s illegal — to work extra hours or to dump trash illegally.”


    Not recommended


    “I wouldn’t let my kids even think about doing this.” - Boris Strbac

    Boris Strbac of Milwaukee is the manager of Star Trucking. He employs 35 drivers and is a former driver who has worked for other companies and on his own.


    Age: 45

    Would you recommend this job? “Never. I wouldn’t let my kids even think about doing this. This is a really, really hard job. On top of that, people don’t respect truck drivers. We are treated as the bad guys on the road by other drivers and the police. The majority of police treat drivers like criminals. We get pulled over for stupid stuff. One of my drivers got a violation because he didn’t have enough windshield fluid. That violation stays on the driver’s record and my company’s record for three years.”

    Is the industry in a crisis? “We are seeing record bookings this year and record pay per mile. The reason is there aren’t enough drivers. The whole industry is a mess. And it’s going to get a hell of a lot more interesting soon. No one knows what to do about the driver shortage. People are banking on driverless trucks, but those are not coming anytime soon.”


    Lonely life


    “You can kiss your social life goodbye.” - Lee Klass
    Lee Klass of Portland, Oregon, has been driving for four decades. He owns his truck now and does the jobs he wants. He says the real problem isn’t the shortage of drivers - it’s all the experienced drivers leaving.

    Age: 70

    Yearly income: Just less than $50,000

    How can companies attract more drivers? “Less rules, more money.”


    What has changed about truck driving in 40 years?

    “There’s massive turnover in truck driving. People are leaving by the tens of thousands. It’s a tough life, and there are too many regulations now. There’s a ton more electronic monitoring than when I started.

    For people who have issues with authority, and I was certainly one of those, this was a good job. You were left on your own. As long as you got your loads delivered, nobody bothered you. Now you’re monitored. As soon as you stop, you get a message from the company asking, ‘Why have you stopped?’

    And the government is tracking you with the electronic logging device.”


    [In December, the U.S. government required all truck drivers to switch to electronic logging devices that track their hours and ensure they don’t drive more than 11 hours during a 14-hour period. Then drivers are required to take a 10-hour break.]


    Would you recommend this job? “You can kiss your social life goodbye.”


    More than driving


    “It’s more than getting behind a steering wheel and driving.” - Ryan Kitchel

    Ryan Kitchel of Greensboro, North Carolina, has been a flatbed truck driver for two years. He used to work in emergency services but wanted a change.

    He is home most weekends, but during the week he drives all over the East Coast with “open trailers” that carry steel, roofs, FEMA trailers and more.


    Age: 36

    Yearly income: $100,000
    Have you gotten a raise lately? “I make decent money. I get paid a percentage [of my load cost].

    But I make about the same that my dad made in the 1970s.”


    What’s frustrating about being a truck driver? “My dad was a truck driver. There was a different level of respect for truck drivers then and more camaraderie.

    Car drivers today have no understanding of what we do. They cut us off all of the time. Car drivers see a space between trucks, and they jump in. They don’t realize that’s our stopping lane. We need that space.”


    Why aren’t more people becoming truckers? “I used to train drivers. A lot of guys don’t realize everything that is involved in trucking. It’s more than getting behind a steering wheel and driving.

    You got to be able to do your paperwork. You got to watch your surroundings. You have to keep the truck and trailer in line. You have to watch everyone around you, because cars aren’t watching.”


    Would you recommend this job? “Yeah. What other job are you going to do minimum training for and jump out of the box making $50,000?”


    Wasted time


    “Companies don’t want to hire you until you have six months of experience.” - Donald Rich
    Donald Rich of Yountville, California, spent 20 years as a cook in the Army. After retiring from the military, he began working at restaurants, but the pay was so lousy that his wife encouraged him to become a truck driver. He got his license in February and was hired immediately.

    Age: 53

    Yearly income: $60,000 (expected)

    What do you like so far about trucking? “It pays twice as much as the restaurant business. And the potential is there to make a lot more. The first year is supposed to be the hardest. A lot of trucking companies don’t want to hire you until you have at least six months of experience.”


    Have other companies tried to lure you away? “Yes.

    Other companies have already tried to lure me away.

    I’ve had calls from eight or nine companies already.

    Some tell me to stay where I am and get more experience.”


    Why is the industry in a crisis? “There’s a lot of wasted time in trucking. The industry could be a lot more efficient. You end up sitting outside a business for six or eight hours waiting for someone to unload your truck. Businesses don’t care, but you are losing hundreds or thousands of dollars of potential pay because you have to just wait.”


    Would you recommend this job? “Yes. It will give you a survival income. But it might not be for you if you don’t like small enclosed spaces and you want to bathe more than twice a week.”


    The Washington Post’s Teddy Amenabar contributed to this report.






    Jeffrey Dow, left, and Michael Dow have been driving for about two decades. They started their own company in 2018. Michael Dow
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    http://www.sunherald.com/news/business/article212151499.html
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    Senior Member Judy's Avatar
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    Up the pay, pay them what that long, lonely, frustrating, boring job is worth.
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    MW
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    I have an uncle that is an independent driver with his own truck. He has been divorced twice, both times his wife was cheating while he was on the road. He has diabetes and has had kidney surgery as a direct result of his profession. His income is around $65,000 a year. Oh, and he has no relationship with his two teenage children.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judy View Post
    Up the pay, pay them what that long, lonely, frustrating, boring job is worth.
    A lot of hours for not that much money. I had three dumptrucks. My drivers seem to be doing better than me. At that time, calculating the hours I put in, I was making about $8.00 per hour. And when something goes wrong, and engine or a driver damaging something, you reach in your pocket.

    But part of the problem is government interference. A driver in my yard was illiterate. But he ran from a quarry to a plant each day, no problem. But then politicians passed laws requiring lots of paperwork. Since he couldn't read, he was out of a job. The paperwork was extra to please government.

    City cops shake down trucks to get money. Even Highway Patrol had crackdowns when they were given a quota. So it isn't easy money.

    My one big wreck was a rear-ender, where an illegal alien with an expire driver's license in a car with expired tags, cut across four lanes to get in front of me and slam on his brakes. The cop was against him but they let him go. So truckers are a target.

    I can't believe our shipping has increased that much. Something else is going on. Maybe all the mail-order. Rather than big trucks delivering to stores, we have UPS/FedEx delivering to homes. More small truck drivers, less for big rigs. And many goods are shipped, unnecessarily across the country when they are available locally. Our country could be managed better.

    But, like every industry where employees are crying for more money, it only means inflation, as everything becomes more expensive. Your buying power does not increase. So your suggestion of "up the pay" is only inflationary!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MW View Post
    I have an uncle that is an independent driver with his own truck. He has been divorced twice, both times his wife was cheating while he was on the road. He has diabetes and has had kidney surgery as a direct result of his profession. His income is around $65,000 a year. Oh, and he has no relationship with his two teenage children.
    I was a local driver, so I was home every night. I could not survive as a cross-country driver.
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    There's nothing wrong with "inflationary". That's higher prices, that's what all businesses want and need to function properly. That's what pays the salaries, the wages, the rent, the banks, and owners and shareholders. As prices rise, that's when more people enter the business to create more competition and levels it out.
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    MW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judy View Post
    There's nothing wrong with "inflationary". That's higher prices, that's what all businesses want and need to function properly. That's what pays the salaries, the wages, the rent, the banks, and owners and shareholders. As prices rise, that's when more people enter the business to create more competition and levels it out.
    There is a huge problem with inflation when folks incomes don't increase enough to keep up!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MW View Post


    There is a huge problem with inflation when folks incomes don't increase enough to keep up!
    That's why you tie minimum wage to the inflation rate.

    Duh.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judy View Post
    There's nothing wrong with "inflationary". That's higher prices, that's what all businesses want and need to function properly. That's what pays the salaries, the wages, the rent, the banks, and owners and shareholders. As prices rise, that's when more people enter the business to create more competition and levels it out.
    Why inflation threatens the middle class

    By Peter Morici
    Published:
    Feb 17, 2017 12:45 p.m. ET

    Growth is too slow to bring higher wages, but costs for everything are rising fast



    The consumer price index is up 2.5% over the past 12 months, the highest inflation rate in four years.Buffeted by slow growth and too few decent paying jobs, Americans now have to deal with more inflation.

    In January, consumer prices rose 0.6%. Although that was driven by a surge in energy prices not likely to repeat, core inflation — prices less food and energy — has been greater than the Fed’s target of 2% for the last year.


    Yet, economic growth is not likely to accelerate enough to support wages that rise as fast as prices going forward.


    Donald Trump’s promised tax cuts and reforms, infrastructure and deregulation initiatives are likely to face a host of obstacles. Those include congressional Republican opposition to further increasing the budget deficit, opposition from adversely affected parties like Wal-Mart WMT, -1.88% and other retailers regarding border tax adjustments, and legal challenges to executive orders — for example, easing labor market and financial regulations.

    Boomers Struggle With Rising Debt, Dwindling Savings


    The Federal Reserve will be faced with an uncomfortable choice — raise rates too quickly to combat inflation or continue printing more money in hopes of further supporting economic growth.

    Here are four things to know about higher inflation.


    1. More Money Won’t Boost Growth

    Much of what caused the financial crisis and slow growth has not been fixed. Big banks are still too big to fail and without a structural solution — namely breaking up the largest institutions and reinstating Glass-Steagall — deregulation or simply lax enforcement of existing rules by former Wall Street executives, who made fortunes making deals and trading, poses new risks.

    Subsidized Chinese products are still flooding U.S. markets, destroying good-paying manufacturing jobs, and Trump is backing off his campaign promise to directly challenge Chinese protectionism.


    Similarly, oil prices US:CLH7 are up enough to soon increase U.S. shale production to 2015 levels — drilling activity has risen significantly since May. However, Trump will face considerable political opposition and years of legal challenges if he tries to boost drilling activity in the Gulf and elsewhere offshore. That will leave the United States dependent on imported oil, and send consumer dollars abroad instead of creating jobs here.


    Absent fixes for those problems — and promised tax cuts — the Fed going slow on interest-rate increases will enable more inflation but won’t do much to boost growth.


    2. Easy Money and High Inflation Steals from the Elderly


    Easy money pushes down rates on CDs where many retired Americans park savings to supplement Social Security and pensions.


    Even with the Federal Reserve pushing up the fed funds rate 0.5 to 0.75 percentage points this year, the rush of foreign capital into U.S. markets will likely keep long rates low, as it did when Ben Bernanke pushed up short rates in 2004-2006.


    Hence short-term CDs will pay a bit more than in recent years but rates on 5- and 10-year deposits are not likely to increase much — none will likely rise enough to compensate for higher inflation.


    3. Federal Policies Make Too Much Inflation Certain


    Many households have only one practical source for high-speed Internet and cable TV, but the government does not regulate cable companies as it does electric utilities. Rates have risen rapidly in recent years.


    Health-care inflation
    is not likely to abate whether Obamacare stays in place, or the Republican Party successfully replaces it with other forms of subsidies to purchase insurance.


    Top private universities and a few elite public institutions have a lock on most good-paying jobs for graduates. Those schools have boosted tuition far more rapidly than even health-care costs. That sets the pace for other schools, and the Trump team is not likely to intervene in their monopoly pricing.


    Federal policies permit prescription-drug manufacturers to charge much higher prices than in Europe but don’t permit consumers to legally import drugs and force competition.

    Here we may see some presidential leadership for reform but progress will be slow.


    4. A Higher Minimum Wage Will Only Make Matters Worse


    When President Barack Obama proposed a $10.10 minimum wage in 2014, the Congressional Budget Office estimated that would destroy about 500,000 jobs. Now absent any change in the federal wage floor, many states have gone into business for themselves — some mandating even more aggressive pay increases.


    Some restaurants and other labor-intensive establishments will shutter, but most will find better ways to use smart machines and save labor.


    Although those holding minimum-wage jobs will earn more, all those extra unemployed workers will push down wages of workers earning near the minimum. Floor managers at fast-food restaurants will have fewer people to supervise but end up accepting barely above new minimum wages to work.

    https://www.marketwatch.com/story/wh...ass-2017-02-17

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