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  1. #1
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
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    South of the border Labor shortage sending farmers to Mexico

    South of the border Labor shortage sending farmers to Mexico
    Originally published April 28, 2008

    By Ike Wilson
    News-Post Staff



    [b]Photo by Doug Koontz

    Agriculture development specialist Colby Ferguson looks at White Lady peaches growing on a tree at Catoctin Mountain Orchard where Frederick County’s “Home Grown Here
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    Senior Member redpony353's Avatar
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    MEXICAN GROWN IS MEXICAN GROWN. I DONT BUY "GROWN IN MEXICO", I BUY GROWN LOCALLY. JUST BECAUSE A MEXICAN FARM IS RUN BY AN AMERICAN DOES NOT MAKE IT A USA FARM. IT IS A MEXICAN FARM. LET THEM SELL THEIR PRODUCT TO THE MEXICANS IF THEY HAVE A FARM IN MEXICO.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Richard's Avatar
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    The United States farm sector has a comparative advantage in grain and beef while the Mexicans have a comparative advantage in some fruit and most vegetables.
    I support enforcement and see its lack as bad for the 3rd World as well. Remittances are now mostly spent on consumption not production assets. Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  4. #4
    Senior Member miguelina's Avatar
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    Scaroni received a big welcome from Mexican agriculture officials. They who told him that with U.S. farmers coming to Mexico, their citizens don't have to risk life and limb entering the United States in search of jobs.
    According to the Labor Department, 53 percent of the 2.5 million farm workers in the United States are undocumented workers, but growers and labor unions say as much as 70 percent of younger field hands are in the U.S. illegally.
    THEN WHY ARE THEY STILL HERE?!?!?!? We all know the answer to that and it ain't LETTUCE!
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