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  1. #11
    April
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    I am writing them all AGAIN! They did not answer me the first time, maybe they will this time!

  2. #12
    Senior Member SOSADFORUS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by April
    I am writing them all AGAIN! They did not answer me the first time, maybe they will this time!
    You go girl!!

    Just a short note will tell them how you feel everyone...get er done, will feel good!!
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  3. #13
    April
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    Quote Originally Posted by SOSADFORUS
    Quote Originally Posted by April
    I am writing them all AGAIN! They did not answer me the first time, maybe they will this time!
    You go girl!!

    Just a short note will tell them how you feel everyone...get er done, will feel good!!
    YEAH IT DOES FEEL GOOD!!! I love to make sure they know where I stand whether they like it or not!

  4. #14
    Senior Member SOSADFORUS's Avatar
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    Senate panel approves tuition bill

    Update: 3/5/09
    Senate panel approves tuition bill :The legislation now advances to the full Senate.

    A Senate committee today approved a bill that would allow illegal immigrants in Colorado to receive in-state tuition despite arguments it was unfair and would provide false hope.

    After nearly five hours of testimony and discussion in a hearing room at the Capitol that was packed at times, the Senate Education Committee approved the measure on a 5-3 party-line vote, with Republicans voting no.

    The legislation now advances to the full Senate.

    The committee today heard from immigration rights groups, advocates of tougher immigration restrictions, veterans and two high school students.

    Senate Bill 228 would allow any student who had attended a Colorado high school for at least three years and graduated to receive the in-state

    "I think you build great societies by offering hope," Romer said. "When you offer people hopelessness, they do hopeless things."

    Two nervous Denver high school students testified that current law was especially painful. The girls, Cecilia Chavez and Ana Galvez, both 17, made emotional pleas for mercy.

    "I know we violated the laws when we came here, but some of us were young and had no choice," said Galvez, who was in tears after testifying. "I am a senior. What do I do?"

    Romer added language to his bill, which still has no House sponsor, that would deny College Opportunity Fund scholarships to illegal immigrants. The vouchers provide more than $2,000 a year to a full-time student in Colorado.

    The lawmaker also added language that would require the students to sign affidavits saying they would seek "legal residency." The affidavit would be considered an educational document protected by federal privacy laws.

    Similar bills have failed before.

    But this year the legislation has the support of some high-profile Republicans from outside the statehouse, including Dick Monfort, co-owner of the Colorado Rockies and chairman of the University of Norther Colorado's board of trustees, and Alex Cranberg, chairman of Aspect Energy and a top GOP donor.

    Monfort told the committee that the system sends mixed messages to the children of illegal immigrants.

    One message, he said, is, "You can better yourself. Work hard. You can go to college. You can become a doctor. You can become a lawyer."

    But then the system tells kids they will have to pay two to five times as much to go to college in Colorado as other students with whom they may have grown up.

    However, Sen. Keith King, R-Colorado Springs, said it might be more fair to offer all foreign students the in-state tuition rate. He and others said it was unfair for foreign students who have entered the country legally to have to pay the high tuition rates of those who didn't follow the law are given the in-state rate.

    King also said the bill was offering false hope to the students, because as illegal immigrants, they would be unable to get jobs in the U.S. after graduating from college.

    Ten states, including Kansas, Utah, Texas, Nebraska and New Mexico, allow illegal immigrants to get in-state tuition.

    Sen. Bob Bacon, D-Fort Collins, the chairman of the committee, proposed an amendment that would permit recently discharged veterans to get the in-state tuition rate.

    However, Sen. Nancy Spence, R-Centennial, called it a "disgrace" to tie the issue to legislation for illegal immigrants.

    "I think it's quite frankly a sham that you're using the military to get your bill passed," she told Romer, pointing out that there was a Republican bill in the House that would offer in-state tuition to veterans.

    The amendment failed.


    http://www.denverpost.com/previous2/hom ... id=1896159
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  5. #15
    April
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    In-state tuition for illegal immigrants gets committee Ok
    March 5, 2009 - 7:22 PM
    JOHN SCHROYER
    THE GAZETTE

    DENVER • During an afternoon of emotional testimony over a proposal to give children of illegal immigrants in-state tuition at Colorado universities, a girl risked being deported to testify on behalf of the measure.

    Ana Galvez, a 17-year-old senior at Denver's Welby New Technology school who is in the United States illegally, told the Senate Education Committee, "What do I do now? Quit after all the hard work I've done? I don't want to."

    Galvez, who was accompanied by a friend who identified herself as a legal resident, served as a sort of poster child for Sen. Chris Romer, D-Denver. Romer, who introduced the bill, said it's not fair to punish the children of illegal immigrants who are in the U.S. "through no fault of their own."

    "We're in the business of building a great society, and you build a great society by offering hope," Romer said.

    The measure, SB170, would benefit only those students who had spent at least three years in the Colorado school system. It would also prohibit illegal immigrants from receiving state-funded financial aid.

    It would further require students to sign an affidavit, once they turn 21, promising that they will seek citizenship as soon as possible.

    The committee approved Romer's proposal 5-3, sending it to the Senate over the opposition of the three Republicans.

    Ten other states, including Texas, Utah, Oklahoma and Kansas, have passed laws granting the children of illegal aliens in-state tuition.

    While Democrats and immigrants-rights activists united behind Romer's initiative, the controversial bill pitted Republican business interests against grass-roots conservatives.

    Among those who testified in favor of the bill were Dick Monfort, a Greeley businessman who is also a member of the University of Northern Colorado Board of Trustees, and Alex Cranberg, the chair of Aspect Energy and a longtime Republican donor.

    Both argued that the bill would bolster the state's work force and contribute significantly to Colorado's economy.

    "I sure as hell can't see how this is not a win for the state of Colorado," Monfort told the committee.

    But Aurora resident Eddie Lake told the committee indignantly, "I'm tired of this country doing what it's doing, letting illegals in and letting them take over the country. It makes me sick to my stomach."

    The bill could change significantly, however, because of a proposed amendment by Sen. Bob Bacon, D-Fort Collins, that would add military veterans to the list of those who would become eligible for in-state tuition.

    Sen. Nancy Spence, R-Centennial, objected to combining the two proposals, saying she'd rather introduce a bill focused solely on veterans.

    Several vets said they might be persuaded to support SB170 if they were given in-state tuition alongside illegal immigrants, but others said the suggestion was an insult.

    http://www.gazette.com/articles/state_4 ... ition.html

  6. #16
    Senior Member SOSADFORUS's Avatar
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    LETS BLAST THEM EVERYONE!!!
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  7. #17
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  8. #18
    Senior Member SOSADFORUS's Avatar
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    Update: 3/17/09

    FOX news also reported on this, this morning seems they are in a real heated debate right no the floor..had two opposing senators on the report.


    Colorado Alliance for Immigration Reform


    March 17, 2009

    Bill SB09-170 is still alive in the Senate - this is the bill that would give in-state tuition to illegal aliens who can not even legally work in our country. It is important for you to call and email the Senators listed below. Tell them to kill this anti-American bill. It is not fair to give tuition breaks to those illegally in the United States when citizens in Colorado can not even afford to send their own children to college.

    Senator Romer (D)
    303-866-4852
    email chris.romer.senate@state.co.us

    Rep Joe Miklosi (D)
    (303)866-2910
    email joe@joemiklosi.com

    Senator Peter Groff (D)
    303-866-3342
    email peter.groff.senate@state.co.us
    Senate Appropriations Committee Members
    # Abel Tapia (D)303-866-2581
    email abel..tapia.senate@state.co.us

    # Maryanne "Moe" Keller (D) 303-866-4856
    email moe.keller.senate@state.co.us

    # Bob Bacon (D)303-866-4841
    email bob.bacon.senate@state.co.us

    # Ted Harvey (R)303-866-4881
    email ted.harvey.senate@state.co.us

    # Mary Hodge (D)303-866-4855
    email mary..hodge.senate@state.co.us

    # Keith King (R)303-866-4880
    email keith.king.senate@state.co.us

    # Mike Kopp (R)303-866-2638
    email mike..kopp.senate@state.co.us

    # Paula Sandoval (D)303-866-4862
    email paula.sandoval.senate@state.co.us

    # Al White (R)303-866-2586
    email al.white.senate@state.co.us

    # Suzanne Williams (D)303-866-3432
    email suzanne.williams.senate@state.co.us

    See the link for more information:
    http://www.alipac.us/modules.php?name=F ... c&t=150048
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  9. #19
    April
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    Working on this!

  10. #20
    April
    Guest
    OMG what a load of BS from this traitor!!!!


    From: joe@joemiklosi.com
    To: XXXXXXXX

    Date: Tue, 17 Mar 2009 14:58:46 -0700

    Dear XXXX, thank you very much for taking time to share your thoughts about SB 170 with me. I always appreciate hearing from Coloradans, even when they do not agree with my stance. Even though I may not be able to change your opinion about this bill, I wanted to take a moment to explain the many benefits of this legislation, correct several misconceptions about this legislation, as well as immigration laws, and convey to you why I decided to sponsor this legislation in the State House.

    I decided to sponsor this bill to both create educational opportunities and hope for talented, hard-working, students who have been forgotten and for pragmatic, economic reasons so that they can be incorporated into our society as taxpaying citizens once they earn a college degree and a job. This bill, which will just offer in-state tuition and no scholarships, will help accomplish that goal.



    Senate Bill 170 is good for our economy, strengthens our communities, keeps us competitive with other Western states, and provides an opportunity for more Coloradans to seek higher education. First, and contrary to some popular beliefs, SB 170 is not just a matter of generosity, but also an economic development strategy to bolster the state's economy. The passage of SB 170 will not cost Colorado tax payers a cent! Also, studies have indicated that college graduates are less likely to get caught in a cycle of poverty and crime, and that they tend to be more productive and civically engaged; they vote more, and are more likely to contribute to the state tax base. The states with higher percentages of college graduates have higher productivity and attract more high-growth biomedical, technology, and new energy corporations.

    Second, we are already funding undocumented students' K-12 education (as federal law has mandated nationwide since a 1982 U.S. Supreme Court decision), and we will be wasting this initial investment if we do not provide an opportunity for these students to pursue higher education and ultimately give back to the state. Undocumented students are currently ten times less likely to attend college and realizing this futility, often drop out during high school. Tuition equity is by no means a free pass to college. Instead, all SB 170 does is to permit this portion of Colorado's population to pay in-state tuition. These students will still have to apply and be accepted, so only the qualified students will benefit from the bill's passage. Additionally, there are no enrollment caps at the 13 community colleges and most of the four year universities and colleges in Colorado, so these students will not be competing for spots with others. I am working with the two universities - the University of Colorado and Colorado State University - to expand their enrollment caps so others are not denied a spot in college.



    Third, SB 170 provides an opportunity for Colorado to stay competitive with our nearby states. Ten other states currently have passed tuition equity legislation, and many of these are Western states: California, Illinois, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, and Washington. California and Texas have calculated that any costs associated with this legislation were minimal when compared with spending on social programs and the higher rates of crime that would result if nothing was done.

    Fourth, when discussing SB 170, I have often heard the argument that it is "unfair" to offer illegal immigrants residing in Colorado in-state tuition, but that it would be more "fair" to offer it to residents of other states instead. Illegal immigrants residing in Colorado pay a considerable amount of state taxes. Even though they are undocumented, every time an illegal immigrant purchases anything, he or she pays a sales tax. Those who own houses pay their property taxes, and those who rent their homes/apartments pay taxes as a part of their rent every month. Additionally, they pay tolls and fuel taxes when driving. The idea behind offering in-state tuition to residents of a given state is that their state taxes have already contributed and helped to subsidize the costs of these state-sponsored colleges and universities, unlike their out-of-state counterparts. In-state tuition averages around $2,340 a semester, while out-of-state tuition averages over $7,000 a semester.

    Fifth, I would like to clear up some of the misconceptions surrounding federal immigration laws. First, there is currently no easy solution or "path to citizenship" for these effected students. The only option out there for these students, many of whom entered the country when they were very young, is to go back to their country and apply for legal re-entry. Although this sounds like an easy process, in order to get back into the country, each applicant must have an immediate relative, who is already a U.S. citizen to serve as a sponsor, and must wait the mandatory 10 years before re-entering. With an arduous and often impossible process like this, not many illegal immigrants will adhere to this federal immigration policy. Second, I have also heard many people argue the futility of educating illegal immigrants because legally, they cannot be hired by Colorado businesses. First of all, educating our residents is always beneficial to our society, regardless of employment status, and secondly, on the federal level, legislation will be introduced shortly that would remedy this concern. The DREAM Act, expected to be introduced in April in the Congress would grant conditional legal residency to these students, as long as they graduate from high school, are accepted by a college, perform two years of community service or two years of military service, and stay out of trouble.

    SB 170 is an incredibly beneficial bill to the state of Colorado and all of its residents. It will help to break the cycle of poverty among this section of Colorado's population and will provide immeasurable hope to those who wish to better themselves and their futures. Even if this email has not persuaded you to support this measure, I sincerely hope that it has at least explained my rationale for supporting it.

    Finally, as you know, immigration and economics are intrinsically connected. We need to think about pragmatic, reasonable solutions that encourage a positive outlet, such as earning a college degree, and not a hopelessness outlet, which can lead to dependence on welfare and the criminal justice system.



    A few months ago, I heard a PhD economist associated with the Independence Institute, which you know is a conservative think tank in Colorado Springs. He said 500 PhD economists of diverse political backgrounds, from liberal to conservative, signed a letter that showed the United States experiences a $20 billion dollar net gain on the economy annually from illegal immigrants. The study incorporated all of the dollars that illegal immigrants use, such as health care and education resources. The economists also calculated all of the sales tax, gas tax, and unreported money that they contribute to the economy. As you know, it is difficult to get two economists to agree on anything - let along 500 of them. The study is pretty convincing.



    Additionally, a recent bi-partisan, federal government, General Accounting Office study showed that it would cost the United States taxpayers $387 billion dollars to identify and deport 15 million people. No one has ever seriously proposed doing this, including former Congressman Tancredo. As a result, we need to think of practical solutions that assimilate undocumented people into our society with opportunity, responsibility and dignity. I also recognize that we need to invest in strong border controls and reform our immigration and Visa system so that the wait list is not decades long and create an immigration system that allows equal access from people from all countries.



    Again, thank you for sharing your opinion on this issue.



    I look forward to the dialogue.



    Sincerely,



    Joe Miklosi

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