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    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    47 Bodies Left in the Wake of Hillary Clinton: Part 1

    The Black Sphere
    Kevin Jackson
    10/15/2013

    47 Bodies Left in the Wake of Hillary Clinton: Part 1

    Hillary Clinton is circling the wagons and salivating over a presidential run in 2016: Hillary accrued power and her life-long dream of being POTUS is nearing.

    But not so fast Hillary. Take a look at the bodies mysteriously left in Clinton’s wake!
    *************************************
    1 – James McDougal

    Convicted Whitewater partner of the Clintons who died of an apparent heart attack, while in solitary confinement. He was a key witness in Ken Starr’s investigation.

    The Baltimore Sun’s Carl M. Cannon wrote on March 9,1998:
    James B. McDougal, a former Clinton business partner who had been cooperating with independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr in the Whitewater investigation, died yesterday in a federal prison hospital in Texas. He was 58.

    McDougal was serving a 3 1/2 -year sentence after Starr’s office successfully prosecuted him on fraud charges stemming from the collapse of Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, a McDougal-owned Arkansas thrift that cost taxpayers $60 million when it failed.

    His death appears to reduce the legal risks to President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, and was a clear setback to Starr and his prosecutors, who huddled in their offices last night after McDougal’s death was announced.
    McDougal, who suffered from heart disease and blocked arteries, died of cardiac arrest, the Justice Department said. He had often predicted that his health wouldn’t hold out long enough for him ever to be free again.
    At the White House, the president issued a statement referring to the early years of his friendship with McDougal.

    “I am saddened to learn about Jim McDougal’s death today,” Clinton said. “I have good memories of the years we worked together in Arkansas, and I extend my condolences to his family.”

    The key accusation against Clinton in the Whitewater land deal phase of Starr’s investigation centers on a claim by former municipal judge David Hale, who maintains Clinton urged him in 1986 to seek a fraudulent $300,0000 government-backed loan.

    The money was never repaid, and prosecutors alleged that some of it was used to prop up the Whitewater Development Corp., a firm co-owned by McDougal, his then-wife, Susan, and the Clintons.

    As noted by Star-Telegram Staff Writer Jack Douglas Jr. and WND:
    When Jim McDougal was taken out of solitary, instead of attempting to defibrillate his heart with equipment on hand at the facility, he was driven over to John Peter Smith hospital. Not the closest hospital to the Fort Worth Federal Medical Center, John Peter Smith hospital is a welfare hospital, where (in the words of one local) ,”They let interns practice on deadbeats”.

    2 – Mary Mahoney


    A former White House intern was murdered July 1997 at a Starbucks Coffee Shop in Georgetown (Washington, D. C.). The murder happened just after she was to go public with her story of sexual harassment by Clinton in the White House.
    Reported by the Western Journalism Center:
    White House intern Died July 1997 An attractive 25-year-old woman, Mahoney was a former White House intern for Bill Clinton working as the assistant manager at a Starbuck’s Coffee shop in Georgetown.

    Gunmen entered the Starbuck’s while the crew was cleaning up after closing. Mahoney’s two associates, Aaron Goodrich, 18 and Emory Evans, 25, were taken to a room and shot.

    Mary herself had five bullets in her, from at least two different guns, most likely with silencers. A total of 10 shots were fired; none of them heard by neighbors in the densely populated Georgetown section.

    Mahoney was shot in the chest, her face, and in the back of the head.

    Even though more than $4,000 remained in the store, the police have categorized the triple murder as a robbery, even as they acknowledge the “execution style” killings.

    There was no sign of forced entry. One report said the cafe was still locked when the bodies were found the next morning. George Stephanopoulos, Monica Lewinsky and Chelsea Clinton were all regulars at the Starbuck’s.

    3 – Vince Foster


    Former White House Councilor, and colleague of Hillary Clinton at Little Rock’s Rose Law Firm. Died of a gunshot wound to the head, ruled a suicide. (He was about to testify against Hillary related to the records she refused to turn over to congress.) Was reported to have been having an affair with Hillary.

    Daily Mail’s Sally Bedell Smith reported:
    On a Monday night in July 1993, a 48-year-old lawyer called Vince Foster was found dead in a park near Washington DC.

    He had died from a gunshot wound to the mouth and his father’s .38-calibre revolver, dating from 1913, was at his side.

    It was the same method of suicide used by a Marine officer in the film A Few Good Men – which Foster was known recently to have watched.

    In the movie, the officer had killed himself because he was distraught about testifying against his commanding officer.

    In real life, Vince Foster was distraught at the prospect of being grilled about the shady affairs of Hillary Clinton.

    A clear case of suicide, then. Or was it? As the months passed, wild rumours began to grow that a hitman had murdered him because he knew too much.
    Tall and handsome, Vince Foster was one of Hillary’s closest colleagues and best friends.

    4 – Ron Brown



    Secretary of Commerce and former DNC Chairman. Reported to have died by impact in a plane crash. A pathologist close to the investigation reported that there was a hole in the top of Brown’s skull resembling a gunshot wound.

    At the time of his death Brown was being investigated, and spoke publicly of his willingness to cut a deal with prosecutors. The rest of the people on the plane also died. A few days later the Air Traffic controller committed suicide.

    Jack Cashill wrote:
    When I first heard of the Ron Brown plane crash in 1996, I presumed it was just that – a crash, an accident. It was not until the revelation of the hole in Brown’s head in late 1997 that I began to question the simplicity of the earlier explanation.

    In exploring Ron Brown’s life, however, I came to see just how desperate were his circumstances, especially at the end. I also came to see how deeply – and willfully – flawed was the investigation into his death.

    What finally convinced me that talk of “murder” was not irresponsible was the official 22-volume Air Force report. To secure it, I had to go through the Freedom of Information Act.

    Contained deep within the report are some astonishing revelations, none of which had ever been revealed in the media.

    The Air Force report also revealed the Enron connection. Even if the plane crash were accidental, Brown and 34 others died for no higher purpose than to secure a sweetheart deal between a fascist dictator and a notoriously corrupt American company.

    This was the “very important challenge of his time” that inspired President Clinton to compare Brown to Martin Luther King. Again, there is much more than can be revealed here.

    In the book, the reader can explore the evidence as to who benefited from Brown’s death and, if he were murdered, who might have executed him and how.

    5 – C. Victor Raiser, II

    Raiser, a major player in the Clinton fund raising organization died in a private plane crash in July 1992.

    As reported in the Chicago Tribune:
    C. Victor Raiser II, finance co-chairman of Gov. Bill Clinton`s presidential campaign, was killed Thursday when a small plane carrying him on a fishing vacation crashed in Alaska. He was 52 and lived in Washington.

    The aircraft, a De Havilland Beaver floatplane, went down near the town of Dillingham, 300 miles southwest of Anchorage, killing Mr. Raiser and his 22-year-old son, R. Montgomery Raiser, along with three other passengers. A sixth passenger and the pilot were injured.
    The New York Times wrote:
    C. Victor Raiser 2d, finance co-chairman of Gov. Bill Clinton’s Presidential campaign, was killed Thursday when a small plane carrying him on a fishing vacation crashed in Alaska. He was 52 years old and lived in Washington.
    The aircraft, a de Havilland Beaver floatplane, went down near the town of Dillingham, 300 miles southwest of Anchorage, killing Mr. Raiser as well as his 22-year-old son, R. Montgomery Raiser, and three other passengers. A sixth passenger and the pilot were injured.

    Mr. Raiser (pronounced RAY-zer), a lawyer, business executive and former finance chairman of the Democratic National Committee, was the Clinton campaign’s finance chairman for the Middle Atlantic States and one of its 12 national finance co-chairmen. On learning Friday of his death, the campaign’s press secretary, Dee Dee Myers, described him as “a major player” in the Clinton organization.

    Mr. Raiser was born in Indianapolis and earned a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University in 1962 and a law degree from the University of Virginia in 1965.

    6 – Paul Tulley



    Democratic National Committee Political Director found dead in a hotel room in Little Rock on September 1992. Described by Clinton as a “dear friend and trusted advisor”.

    The New York Times wrote:
    Paul Tully, the political director of the Democratic National Committee and one of his party’s pre-eminent strategists, was found dead in Little Rock, Ark., today. He was 48 years old.

    Coroner Steve Nawojczyk of Pulaski County said Mr. Tully’s body was found about 3 P.M. today by a maid at the hotel where he was living in Little Rock. Pending results of an autopsy, the coroner said Mr. Tully appeared to have died of natural causes.

    Mr. Tully was among the most impassioned and intense of a generation of Democratic political professionals who devoted much of their lives to regaining the White House. He worked in every Presidential election since 1968.

    He had moved to Little Rock this fall to aid in Gov. Bill Clinton’s drive for the White House. Ronald H. Brown, the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, said in a statement tonight: “There will be only one Paul Tully. Pacing, driven, and full of joy, Paul’s commitment to our party and, more importantly, to making this great nation even greater was a fire that burned bright and long.”

    7 – Ed Willey

    Clinton fundraiser, found dead November 1993 deep in the woods in VA of a gunshot wound to the head. Ruled a suicide. Ed Willey died on the same day his wife Kathleen Willey claimed Bill Clinton groped her in the oval office in the White House. Ed Willey was involved in several Clinton fund raising events.

    Willey’s wife, Kathleen asserted in an interview:
    In a new book alleging a campaign of slander and intimidation orchestrated chiefly by Hillary Clinton, Kathleen Willey points a finger of suspicion at the former first couple for the death of her husband, who was believed to have killed himself.

    Willey, who claims she was groped by President Clinton in the White House, acknowledged in an interview with WND today that she stands by the speculation she poses about her husband’s demise in “Target: Caught in the Crosshairs of Bill and Hillary Clinton.

    Asked if she suspects her husband Ed, a lawyer and son of a prominent Virginia lawmaker, was murdered, Willey replied, “Most definitely.”

    “I’m having someone with a forensics background look at this, and I intend to pursue this further, now that these questions have been raised,” she told WND, pointing to alleged discrepancies in the autopsy report.
    Does she believe the Clintons were involved?
    “I do have suspicions,” Willey said, “yes.”

    8 – Jerry Parks



    Head of Clinton’s gubernatorial security team in Little Rock .. Gunned down in his car at a deserted intersection outside Little Rock . Park’s son said his father was building a dossier on Clinton . He allegedly threatened to reveal this information. After he died the files were mysteriously removed from his house.

    KATV Channel 7 reports:
    It’s a tragic story with many twists and turns that leaves a Little Rock woman with little information about her father’s murder.

    “Shortly before 7:00 Sunday night, police found the bullet-riddled body of a middle-aged Roland man lying outside his car near the intersection of Chenal Parkway and Highway 10 in west Little Rock,” Channel 7′s Geoff Morrell reported in a KATV news broadcast on September 26, 1993.

    It was a day that Denise Hickman can recall like it was yesterday.
    “I remember getting a phone call from my dad’s widow saying that my father had been hurt. And I asked her what happened and she told me that he was dead. And then I just dropped the phone,” said Hickman.
    Someone in a white Chevy pulled up to Jerry Parks car and just started shooting.

    “The occupant of the Chevrolet then fired approximately ten shots based upon the evidence we found at the scene,” said Doc Holladay in 1993, back then as a spokesperson for the Little Rock Police Department.

    Hickman’s dad was a private investigator and owner of a security company. He would have been turning 67 years old July 3. She was 26 when he was murdered.
    Read this 1997 account of events by Ambrose Evans-Pritchard:
    “I’M A DEAD MAN,” whispered Jerry Parks, pale with shock, as he looked up at the television screen. It was a news bulletin on the local station in Little Rock. Vincent Foster, a childhood friend of the President, had been found dead in a park outside Washington. Apparent suicide.

    He never explained to his son Gary what he meant by that remark, but for the next two months the beefy 6′ 3″ security executive was in a state of permanent fear. He would pack a pistol to fetch the mail. On the way to his offices at American Contract Services in Little Rock he would double back or take strange routes to “dry-clean” the cars that he thought were following him.

    At night he kept tearing anxiously at his eyebrows, and raiding the valium pills of his wife, Jane, who was battling multiple sclerosis. Once he muttered darkly that Bill Clinton’s people were “cleaning house,” and he was “next on the list.”

    Two months later, in September 1993, Jerry and Jane went on a Caribbean cruise. He seemed calmer. At one of the islands he went to take care of some business at a bank. She believed it was Grand Cayman. They returned to their home in the rural suburbs of Little Rock on September 25. The next day Jane was in one of her “down” periods, so Jerry went off on his own for the regular Sunday afternoon supper at El Chico Mexican Restaurant.
    On the way back, at about 6:30 PM, a white Chevrolet Caprice pulled up beside him on the Chenal Parkway. Before Parks had time to reach for his .38 caliber “detective special” that he kept tucked between the seats, an assassin let off a volley of semi-automatic fire into his hulking 320 pound frame.

    Parks skidded to a halt in the intersection of Highway 10. The stocky middle-aged killer jumped out and finished him off with a 9 mm handgun–two more shots into the chest at point blank range. Several witnesses watched with astonishment as the nonchalant gunman joined his accomplice in the waiting car and sped away.

    It was another three months before news of the murder of Jerry Luther Parks reached me in Washington. The U.S. national media were largely unaware of the story, which surprised me because Parks had been in charge of security at the 1992 Clinton-Gore campaign headquarters in Little Rock.

    9 – James Bunch

    An influential Texan. Died from a gunshot suicide. It was reported that he had a “Black Book” of people which contained names of influential people who visited Prostitutes in Texas and Arkansas

    10 – John Wilson



    Was found dead in May 1993 from an apparent hanging suicide. He was reported to have ties to the Clintons ‘ Whitewater deals.

    As written by the Washington City Paper:
    On May 19, 1993, the D.C. government lost one of its early Home Rule-era leaders and most accomplished legislators. D.C. Council Chairman John A. Wilson was found dead in the basement laundry room of his Southwest home by his wife, Bonnie, and chauffeur.

    His death, ruled a suicide by the Metropolitan Police Department, sent shock waves through the D.C. political scene, of which Wilson was a 20-year veteran. The longtime Ward 2 council member, who assumed the council chairmanship in 1991, was known for his own brand of brazen politics.

    http://theblacksphere.net/2013/10/47-bodies-left-in-the-wake-of-hillary-clinton-part-i/10/
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    The man who knew too much? The truth about the death of Hillary Clinton's close friend Vince Foster

    By SALLY BEDELL SMITH
    Last updated at 00:23 15 January 2008

    Hillary's bid for the White House is taking its toll

    On a Monday night in July 1993, a 48-year-old lawyer called Vince Foster was found dead in a park near Washington DC.
    He had died from a gunshot wound to the mouth and his father's .38-calibre revolver, dating from 1913, was at his side.
    It was the same method of suicide used by a Marine officer in the film A Few Good Men - which Foster was known recently to have watched.
    In the movie, the officer had killed himself because he was distraught about testifying against his commanding officer.
    In real life, Vince Foster was distraught at the prospect of being grilled about the shady affairs of Hillary Clinton.
    A clear case of suicide, then. Or was it? As the months passed, wild rumours began to grow that a hitman had murdered him because he knew too much.
    Tall and handsome, Vince Foster was one of Hillary's closest colleagues and best friends.
    In Little Rock, Arkansas, they were partners in a law firm while Bill Clinton was governor of the state. And, naturally, when the Clintons moved to the White House, Vince Foster came, too.
    It was unusual for Hillary to have such a close friendship with a man. Since her school days, she had operated most easily among women; and when it came to appointing her own staff at the White House, she chose 29 women and one man.
    Her subordinates - who called her "The Big Girl" or later "Big Mama" and wore badges saying "Hillaryland" - had a starry-eyed devotion that was almost cult-like.
    One of Hillary's friends said: "They were all afraid to say no to her."
    She was a hard taskmaster and would call her staff at home after hours to make trifling requests.
    Scroll down for more ...
    Mutual admiration: Hillary Clinton with Vince Foster, whose death in 1993 was ruled a suicide

    Read more...



    According to White House chronicler Bob Woodward, she "frequently reduced her personal travelling aide to tears" when the assistant failed to produce something Hillary needed.
    She had a temper, but instead of "making nice" afterwards, as Bill did, Hillary withdrew in cool silence.
    "One time, Hillary said: 'Mel, your problem is you just aren't mean enough,'" recalled her friend Mary Mel French.
    "I couldn't work for her and keep our friendship. She is too dogmatic. She gets so into it that she ends up being mean. That is why she has to have such a young staff. They take it, and they bow and scrape."
    According to one commentator, the reason Hillary surrounded herself with women was because she found men too complicated. Indeed, she once told former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who owed her appointment to Hillary's support: "We both know what a**holes men can be."
    The one man who was definitely not an a**hole was Vince Foster. Hillary used to say he reminded her of Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird - reserved, upright and dependable.
    "People gravitated to Vince because he was a world-class listener," recalled a former Little Rock lawyer. "Women were drawn to him not just because he was smart and handsome, but because he seemed to keep secrets."
    At the funeral for Hillary's father, who died during the Clintons' first term at the White House, it was on Foster's shoulder that the First Lady rested her slightly over-large head.
    Inevitably, this intimate gesture added fuel to rumours that they were - or at least had been - romantically involved. After all, Bill Clinton had been seeking his pleasures elsewhere - so why not Hillary?
    Aware of all the talk even before his arrival in Washington, Foster himself raised the subject in his first meeting with the man who would be his immediate boss, White House counsel Bernie Nussbaum.
    There was no truth in the rumour, said Foster. And when his wife, Lisa, was asked about it later, she insisted: "I don't think Hillary would do it. I think, in a lot of ways, he felt sort of protective of her."
    Hillary had long relied on Foster as a confidant, telling him before Bill's inauguration that, despite being an unelected spouse, she was going to "take command" and be "involved in this presidency" - a conversation he recorded in a journal. In turn, he idolised her.
    Did that admiration make him cross a line that would normally have stopped him short? In the weeks before the inauguration, he had worked intensively with another Arkansas lawyer to expunge Bill and Hillary's financial records of a shady land deal - a scandal later known as the Whitewater affair.
    Later, there were several official investigations into the Clintons' complex web of financial and real estate dealings, which culminated in criminal convictions for some of their associates, though Hillary and Bill were never prosecuted themselves.
    Whitewater was later seen as symptomatic of the culture that existed in Arkansas during Bill's governorship, when the Clintons' connections helped them to enrich themselves.
    For example, to augment her $110,000 salary, Hillary had earned large sums from seats on local corporate boards, including Wal-Mart.
    One company chairman explained Hillary's presence on his board as "making sure he was in good grace with the people in power."
    In that atmosphere, Bill and Hillary developed a sense of entitlement, borrowing from banks operated by political friends and accepting favours from individuals and corporations, such as the free use of private planes.
    Was some of this weighing on Vince Foster's mind when he became both White House deputy counsel and attorney for both Bill and Hillary? What is certain is that he was unsettled by the First Lady's increasingly uncompromising demands.
    In March 1993, he told a colleague that she had "snapped at him" - a rebuke that "hurt him deeply."
    Scroll down for more ...
    Hillary is determined to follow her husband's footsteps as President

    It was clear that Foster was having difficulty being ordered around by the woman who had recently been his equal.
    One of his first jobs in the White House was to try to make sense of the Clintons' false tax returns concerning the Whitewater land investment. A note in his hand-writing, found much later, warned that Whitewater was "a can of worms you shouldn't open."
    Another "can of worms" that landed on his desk concerned the collapse of a bank called Madison Guaranty. To his consternation, allegations were being made that funds from the bank had been illegally diverted to Bill Clinton's campaign for governor in the mid-Eighties - and that Bill and Hillary had intervened with state regulators to help keep the bank solvent.
    Foster was also fretting over the "excessive" sums Hillary was lavishing on redecoration of the White House.
    In the end, though, it was the firing of seven staff - following pressure from the imperious First Lady - that "drove Vince batty," according to White House counsel Bernie Nussbaum.
    Hillary had become convinced that the staff in the travel office that served the White House press corps were guilty of "financial mismanagement and waste." Foster was asked to help get rid of them.
    In a meeting with him on May 13, 1993, Hillary asked him if he was "on top of" the travel office situation. He assured her that his team was working on it.
    Afterwards, Foster noted that Hillary's mood was "general impatience ... general frustration."
    Other White House aides later confirmed that she wanted her own "people" in the office, and that everyone felt "there would be hell to pay" if her wishes were defied.
    On May 19, the travel office's seven employees were fired - and there was immediate uproar. Allegations of cronyism hit the headlines when it emerged that a distant cousin of Bill was to be put in charge of the office, while a friend of a friend was being promoted to take over some of the White House's air-charter business.
    Worse still, none of the charges against the original travel office employees stood up, and their precipitous dismissals became a damaging test of Hillary's honesty.
    She now insisted that the firings were not her fault. Others had misconstrued an "off-hand comment": she had meant only to suggest that the staff should "look into" questions about mismanagement.
    Hillary also insisted she didn't know the "origin of the decision" to remove the employees, and that she "did not direct that any action be taken."
    An official report issued seven years later concluded that her statements had been "factually false."
    At the time, Vince Foster felt deeply responsible for the imbroglio and was worried that Congress might investigate. White House aide David Watkins remembers Foster saying to him "My God, what have we done?" and expressing concern that Hillary's role in the firings would come to light.
    He urged Watkins to protect "the client" at all costs.
    Foster knew that in shielding Hillary, he might have to mislead congressional investigators under oath - a grim prospect for a man who took pride in being a straight arrow.
    By mid-July, he had lost more than a stone in weight and seemed unusually subdued. He twice told his wife that he felt under pressure and was thinking of returning to Arkansas.
    Talking to a colleague about his dealings with Hillary, he said: "It's not the same." On one matter after another, he confided, she would bark "Fix it, Vince!" or "Handle it, Vince!" and leave him to pick up the pieces.
    On July 16, Foster and his wife drove to an inn in Maryland for the weekend. At dinner that night, Foster cried when Lisa asked him "if he felt trapped." Three days later, he called his doctor, who gave him a prescription for the antidepressant Desyrel.
    The following night, July 20, he was found dead.
    Hillary burst into tears when she was told. But her behaviour, as well as that of staff and associates, in the days following Foster's death was to haunt the administration for years, raising questions about what the Clintons had to hide - about Whitewater, "Travelgate," the failed Arkansas bank and more besides.
    The night after the tragedy, White House staff - including Hillary's Chief of Staff - searched Foster's office for a suicide note. Under the noses of the police and FBI, they took away a number of sensitive files.
    Later, it was alleged but never proved that the Clintons had combed through these files during the five days before they were handed over.
    Other key papers - records for Hillary's legal work on the failed Arkansas bank - appear to have gone missing, too. Although later the subject of a subpoena, the records were not retrieved for more than two years.
    Whatever the truth behind all the activity that followed Foster's death, the appearance of concealment was enough to trigger five separate federal inquiries.
    There were also three official investigations into Foster's death, all of which concluded that he had committed suicide.
    After Foster's funeral in Arkansas, Hillary had difficulty getting out of bed for several days. Her friend's death had "ripped a hole" through her, according to Ann McCoy, a friend from Arkansas.
    On the day she returned to her office, a torn-up note on yellow paper was found at the bottom of Foster's briefcase. It was a list of grievances and concerns about life in the White House that he had jotted down in the days before his death.
    Nussbaum went to Hillary's office to tell her he'd "found something Vince wrote that may help explain why he did what he did."
    Hillary "looked startled," Nussbaum recalled. She glanced at the note, said "I can't deal with this," and abruptly left the room.
    The contents of Foster's note were tantalising. At one point, the man who knew so many of the First Couple's secrets had written: "The public will never believe the innocence of the Clintons and their loyal staff."
    It was a comment that can be interpreted to mean that he believed the Clintons were blameless - or that he was worried about some unspecified information that could destroy Bill and Hillary's reputation.
    At the very least, the note revealed just how hard working for Hillary had become.
    "I was not meant for the job in the spotlight of public life in Washington," Foster had written. "Here, ruining people is considered sport."
    • Extracted from For Love Of Politics: The Clintons In The White House by Sally Bedell Smith, to be published by Aurum Press on February 4 at Ł25.
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    47 Bodies Left in the Wake of Hillary Clinton: Part 2

    EMAIL FEATURED, POLITICS 215 COMMENTS




    By Tami Jackson
    Hillary Clinton wants to prove that 2016 will be the year of the woman — she wants to check off the last item on her power grab bucket list: Madam President.

    Last month I began the search into the well publicized list of 47 deaths, 47 bodies in the wake of Hillary Clinton.
    Accidents happen. Planes crash, people take their lives out of desperate grief and overwhelming hopelessness.
    But the question we should each ask ourselves is, what are the probabilities that such a number of people, closely related to Hillary and Bill, many of whom harbored troublesome Clinton secrets, would die mysterious deaths?
    The probabilities are not good. Add to that the murders and even execution/hit-style murders, and this list should make every American at least uneasy.



    *************************************
    11 – Kathy Ferguson


    Ex-wife of Arkansas Trooper Danny Ferguson, 38 year old Kathy Ferguson was found dead in May 1994, in her living room with a gunshot to her right temple. It was ruled a suicide even though there were several packed suitcases, as if she were going somewhere.
    Ferguson was a hospital worker and her death came a mere 5 days after the death of her ex-husband’s.
    Danny Ferguson was a co-defendant along with Bill Clinton in the Paula Jones Lawsuit, and Kathy Ferguson was a possible corroborating witness for Paula Jones.
    The LA Times reported:
    The ex-wife of a state trooper who is a co-defendant in a sexual harassment lawsuit against President Clinton died in an apparent suicide.
    Kathy Ferguson, 37, was found dead of a gunshot wound to the right temple early Wednesday at the home of her boyfriend, said Mark Malcolm, chief deputy coroner for Pulaski County.
    Read more at http://theblacksphere.net/2013/11/47...GB3yqE9P7gg.99
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    From ‘What Difference Does It Make?’ To Biggest Regret: Clinton To Rewrite History

    “My biggest, you know, regret is what happened in Benghazi,” Clinton said
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    Hillary’s Billionaires

    Billionaires Alice Walton, George Soros, and Marc Benioff all made major contributions to the Super PAC supporting Hillary Clinton’s presidential run in 2016, according to recent Federal Election Commission filings.

    The three each contributed $25,000 to Ready for Hillary PAC, the maximum allowed donation, Bloomberg reported on Sunday.

    Walton is the daughter of Walmart founder Sam Walton. She is the world’s 13th richest person and has an estimated worth of $33.9 billion.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    Financier George Soros backs Hillary Clinton for U.S. president

    Billionaire financier George Soros, a major Democratic donor, is backing an effort to persuade former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to run for president in 2016, a spokesman said on Thursday.
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