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Thread: Trump Has A Serious Problem With Unbound Delegates

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  1. #1
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Trump Has A Serious Problem With Unbound Delegates

    Trump Has A Serious Problem With Unbound Delegates
    AP Photo/Darron Cumings
    BY: HANK BERRIEN
    APRIL 25, 2016
    44564
    Among the unbound delegates already named who are headed for the GOP convention in Cleveland, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is dominating, according to TIME.

    TIME reports that of the 63 delegates, 26 either totally support Cruz, lean toward him or simply will not support Trump. The only delegate supporting Trump comes from North Dakota. Even Trump’s local campaign chair from American Samoa would not commit to voting for Trump. Fifteen delegates would not tell TIME which candidate they supported; 15 more could not be contacted by TIME. Five unbound delegates from the Virgin Islands do not know if they will be eligible to vote at the GOP convention, as Virgin Islands’ Republican Party chair, John Canegata, is trying to replace them.


    Of the 2,472 delegates at the convention, roughly 5% will be unbound; the actual number cannot be determined as yet because the primary season has not been completed and some will not be known until the first ballot has been taken at the convention.

    Trump has boasted, “If we’re 20 votes short or if we’re 100 short and we’re at 1,100 and somebody else is at 500 or 400, because we’re way ahead of everybody, I don’t think you can say that we don’t get it automatically.” He threatened “riots” if he was leading in delegates and wasn’t handed the nomination. But last Thursday, a senior RNC official quashed Trump’s claim, asserting, “If you have 1,237 bound delegates, you are the presumptive nominee—that’s it. If you’re short, nope.”


    Colorado, North Dakota, Louisiana, Guam, the Virgin Islands and American Samoa have all named unbound delegates; Pennsylvania will add 54 more on Tuesday. Trump needs roughly 60% of all remaining delegates to win the nomination on the first ballot with bound delegates.

    On Saturday, Cruz picked up 19 of 20 delegates at the Maine GOP convention.

    http://www.dailywire.com/news/5219/t...s-hank-berrien

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  2. #2
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    Thanks John Doe ! We as a country have huge problems, as we all know. I never thought that our political system was so drastically and criminally rigged that our election system was blatantly unfair. The political protitutes that designed these systems in every state should be prosecuted quickly and jailed. Our country needs someone like Trump with the nerve to correct the corrupt government.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Kasich can release all of his delegates before the first round and ask them to vote for Cruz.
    Rubio, Bush and anyone else who has any delegates from the early primary states can release them before the first round and ask them to vote for Cruz or Trump.
    The only problem is once you release them you lose all control of them.
    They can vote for anyone on the face of the earth.
    They should only vote for a registered Republican.
    They should only vote for Cruz or Trump.
    But if they don't the only thing the RNC can do is sue them and hope the judge makes them pick Cruz or Trump.
    But there is no guarantee.
    And that becomes too expensive and time consuming for their one vote.
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    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    If a candidate drops out of the race what happens to his/her delegates?

    Alan MacNeill

    It depends on several factors.

    1. Technically, a delegate is only bound to vote for their candidate if their candidate is actually nominated for the nomination at the convention.

    Not all candidates who ran get nominated for the nomination. If a delegate's pledged candidate is not nominated for the nomination, then the delegate is free to vote their conscience.


    2. There are two sorts of "Dropping out".


    A Candidate can formally withdraw from the race. If that happens, their pledged delegates are automatically freed to vote their conscience.


    A Candidate can also just "Suspend My Active Campaign". If they do this, they are still *legally* "Running" for the office, they just are not making speeches and the like. Candidates do this so they can keep their campaign committees open and raise money to pay off campaign debt (fun fact, there are still technically candidates "Running" for election to the Presidency in 2008, their campaigns are working on retiring the campaign debts).

    A candidate who is just "suspending" maintains their bound delegates (Assuming they Are nominated for the nomination at the convention, see #1 above).


    3. A candidate, when dropping out, can formally endorse and recommend another candidate for the office. If they do that, their delegates are NOT *required* to vote for the other candidate, but it's heavily expected.

    https://www.quora.com/U-S-Presidenti...-her-delegates
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  5. #5
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK View Post
    Thanks John Doe ! We as a country have huge problems, as we all know. I never thought that our political system was so drastically and criminally rigged that our election system was blatantly unfair. The political protitutes that designed these systems in every state should be prosecuted quickly and jailed. Our country needs someone like Trump with the nerve to correct the corrupt government.
    People complain about the process being too confusing every election. But you can't change the rules during the election. You have to wait until the election is over and change the rules before the next election starts. But when the election is over everyone just walks away and does nothing so people are left with the same rules and problems for the next election.

    And they will this time too.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Judy's Avatar
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    Trump will fix this problem, too. He's working hard to win this election based on delegates assigned by winning votes, which is the way it should be. Although fixing it won't help him this election, it will help others i the future, so I'm confident that he will do everything he can to see this problem corrected to more fairly match bound delegates to the voters so that if you win the state, you win the most delegates.

    I think what made the way delegates are bound and unbound so exposed in this year's primary election is because there were so many primary candidates in the Republican race that distributed the delegates in a strange way, the fact that Mitt Romney with his HATE TRUMP, STOP TRUMP, NEVER TRUMP and ANYONE BUT TRUMP campaign tried lies and dirty tricks to defeat the will of the people and of course the remaining weak and characterless wannabes that are losing couldn't resist the temptation to be spoilers and part of this evil to win the nomination behind the backs of the voters.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Beezer's Avatar
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    Trump needs to fix the corrupt delegate system. Implement a National Voter ID Law and put a cap on how much money each candidate can raise so it is an even playing field.

    No more bought and paid for lying career politicians by special interest groups. Once they reach that cap...no more money...so spend it wisely. What a monumental waste of millions and millions of dollars for attack ads!

  8. #8
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    The problem with actually implementing a new system, though, is two-fold. First, the current beneficiaries will do just about anything to preserve their positions, whilst others only see the drawbacks with the system every four years and then forget about them until the next nomination season rolls around.

    "Some 300 bills have been introduced in Congress over the years to reform presidential primaries "and not one of them has seen the light of day."

    ------------------------------------------


    The U.S. Has a Primary Problem


    Primary elections, from the presidential level on down, are a total mess.

    By Pat Garofalo | Assistant Managing Editor Feb. 19, 2016, at 6:00 a.m.


    (Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images)

    When it was all said and done and the final results were tallied, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders fought to a tie in New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary.
    Wait, what?

    Yes, Sanders won the election in the Granite State by a whopping 22 points, dealing what was trumpeted from coast to coast as a major blow to the Clinton campaign and its oft-mentioned "inevitability" ahead of Saturday's Nevada caucus. But when the delegates were doled out – and in presidential nomination races, they're the number that really matters – each camp walked out of New Hampshire with at least 15.


    That's because Clinton, while losing the state's allocated delegates 15-9, has the support of six New Hampshire "superdelegates," party insiders who get to cast a vote at the nominating convention divorced from any election result.


    Undemocratic? You bet. But it's par for the course when it comes to America's primaries, which from the presidential level right on down are a disaster of disenfranchisement, discrimination and despair. In short, America has a serious primary problem.


    [READ: 5 Things We've Learned About the 2016 Presidential Election]

    Let's start at the top: Our system for choosing presidential nominees makes little sense. As Brookings Institution senior fellow Elaine Kamarck wrote recently, "There are many different ways to organize a presidential nominating system and almost all of them are more rational and orderly than the hodgepodge of systems that voters experience today."

    To start, Iowa and New Hampshire go first simply because they do, even though they are wildly unrepresentative of the nation as a whole. They're smaller, way more white and way more rural, and, in the case of Iowa, more evangelical, with a side of bizarre special-interest politics in the form of the ethanol lobby. Yet they shake up the race, thinning the herd before most of the country has a chance to vote.





    In fact, the order of the primaries effectively disenfranchises millions of Americans. It's possible that the primaries and caucuses in March and April will result in two candidates having insurmountable delegate leads. So what about voters in states whose primaries aren't until May or even June?

    And these aren't small buckets of people: They're the residents of California, New Jersey, New Mexico and the Dakotas. (Adding some insult to injury, the already disenfranchised residents of the District of Columbia vote dead last in the nation.) The sequential system, as currently designed, makes the votes of millions of Americans far less important than the few residents of the early states. Some 535,000 caucus-goers in Iowa can matter more than the millions eligible to vote in the Golden or Garden States, depending on what happens there in terms of culling candidates or setting "expectations" for the rest of the campaign.


    "No one sat down one day and said Iowa must go first, by God, and then New Hampshire," says David Karol, associate professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland. "That's a historical accident."

    Even if the results aren't necessarily predictive of who ultimately gets the nomination, the two early states have an effect on the race disproportionate to their size or demographic makeup.


    Which brings us to our second problem: caucuses.


    Several states, including early-goers Iowa and Nevada, use caucuses rather than secret ballot elections to decide who gets their presidential delegates. This process – more akin to a public meeting than an election, particularly on the Democratic side – warps the nomination race by severely limiting voter turnout and rewarding more extreme voters.


    Because coming to a caucus is much more of a commitment than casting a traditional secret ballot – both in the amount of time it takes and, for the Democratic primary in Iowa at least, having to publicly declare your allegiance – they tend to attract the most committed supporters of a candidate and only those who have the time to navigate the drawn-out process.


    "Even after accounting for many other factors, caucus attenders were more ideologically extreme than primary voters," wrote Brigham Young University political science professors Christopher Karpowitz and Jeremy Pope. "Voters who perceive caucuses as unfair, less friendly to different points of view, and better for special interests may not be able to perfectly articulate what is wrong with caucuses, but their intuition that caucuses are not representative is supported by the data."


    [SEE: Editorial Cartoons on the 2016 Presidential Elections]

    Consider: Iowa caucus winner Ted Cruz, a Republican GOP senator from Texas, received just 51,000 votes, out of a state with some 2 million eligible voters. For anyone who can't afford to take several hours to caucus in the evening due to a job or parental duties or who knows what other responsibility, too bad. (And don't even get me started on Iowa's coin tosses.)

    Which brings us finally to the superdelegates. Clinton currently leads Sanders in the superdelegate count by a total of 362 to 8. To many critics, these delegates are the epitome of unaccountable party politicking; they were explicitly brought into being after Democratic officials were unhappy with the winners of the 1972 and 1976 presidential primaries.


    These delegates can switch so there aren't enough of them to reverse a landslide, but it is theoretically possible for them to tip a close election one way or the other. It's never really come to that, and there are reasons to think the superdelegates wouldn't ultimately reverse the voters' will, but it could mathematically happen. (Republicans have superdelegates too, but they aren't free to vote for any old candidate.)


    The upshot of the presidential primary system, then, is that it leaves a lot of people out in the cold unless the race is so competitive that it comes down to the final few states. Even then, voters in later states don't get to choose from the same slate of candidates as those who go first. And superdelegates add a veneer of party wheeling and dealing to the process that doesn't have to be there, even if their effect on the final tally is usually negligible.


    But local primaries are actually a bigger problem. In many places, primaries at the local level, as they are for state or presidential elections, are "closed," meaning only registered members of the party can participate. While this may make sense in elections for federal offices, where party ID really matters, at the local level, where politics is often dominated by one party, it really doesn't.


    Consider Washington, D.C., or Baltimore. In both places, the Democratic primary is considered the be-all, end-all of election season; the winner is the odds-on favorite to win in the general election come November. In fact, the winner of the Democratic primary has won every mayoral election in D.C. since the city created the position.


    About 76 percent
    of the capital city is registered Democratic, while 17 percent are of no party and 6 percent are Republican. Those who, for whatever reason, don't wish to register as a Democrat are in many cases frozen out of the decision-making process entirely by not being able to participate in the primary.

    By the time the general comes around, the simple weight of numbers renders their votes largely meaningless. (The absurdity is compounded by Democrats simply switching to run as "independents" for the city council seats explicitly set aside for non-majority parties.)


    A trip down the Baltimore-Washington Parkway to Charm City, as it's known, finds an even bigger mess.

    Thirteen candidates are running in the Democratic primary to replace outgoing Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake this year. The winner of that primary, again, is the overwhelming favorite to triumph in November due to the city's partisan tilt; only 8 percent of registered voters are Republican. So it's possible for the preferred candidate of a small subsection of one party to assume office in the fall. The latest poll, taken before Black Lives Matter activist DeRay Mckesson jumped into the race at the last second, shows former Mayor Sheila Dixon leading with 27 percent of the vote.


    [PHOTOS: The Big Picture – January 2016]

    At the national level, closed primaries, for all their faults, help knit together disparate national parties. For local elections, however, they simply freeze out anyone not willing to affiliate with the party in power.

    All that said, "the way party leaders are chosen around the world is much less inclusive," says Karol. "The big clear trend over the course of American history is toward more participation and more inclusion."

    Indeed, until fairly recently party elites in the U.S. simply foisted nominees onto voters, as they do in many countries operating parliamentary systems; the process is much improved since then.


    Still, a recent Morning Consult poll showed broad dissatisfaction with the current primary process. Large majorities support dumping Iowa and New Hampshire as the first primaries (and also making Election Day a national holiday, a good move for boosting voter turnout).


    The problem with actually implementing a new system, though, is two-fold. First, the current beneficiaries will do just about anything to preserve their positions, whilst others only see the drawbacks with the system every four years and then forget about them until the next nomination season rolls around. But more importantly, the fixes all have their own downsides. One big national primary? Name ID and money could play a bigger role than they already do. Rotating regional primaries (an idea which I'm very sympathetic to)? Again, more territory preferences, money, plus anyone from the first region gets a big advantage.


    It's also unclear if Congress, the natural arbiter, even has the power to re-do the system, or the political will to follow through assuming it did.
    As Kamarck noted, some 300 bills have been introduced in Congress over the years to reform presidential primaries "and not one of them has seen the light of day."

    At the local level, cities could experiment with the so-called "blanket primary" system used in California, Louisiana and Washington state, in which all candidates run in one primary and the top two vote-getters – regardless of party – move on to the general election. While the jury is out on how such a system benefits state-level elections, it would certainly give marginalized parties more of an opportunity to participate in places where they currently have next to no say at all.

    There are no quick and easy solutions here, no snap of the fingers that will turn our current morass into the perfect system. But one thing is clear: We could do a lot better.


    http://www.usnews.com/news/the-repor...ons-are-broken
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