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  1. #21
    marlee's Avatar
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    This is unreal!!!!! IBut of course I believe it, I knew we were the only stupid country (of course all the illegals know it). We need to make changes fast if we are to survice this battle. We need to MARCH on Washington and let our politicians know this is the end of our supporting every other country except ours. I have no intention of travelling to Mexico to spend money for a very long time!!!! By the way...you are also not allowed to own land in Mexico - imagine........

  2. #22
    marlee's Avatar
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    There are many people who die everyday because they cannot afford to eat, have shelter, and receive free medical treatment. And this is right here in the United States. How about the senior citizens who worked all their live in order to suupport illegals through their social security income? My parents medical benefits are cut every year and their portion is raised. The retirement wage is not cutting it just because of the illegals. Why doesn't everyone receive free medical?????

  3. #23
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    You know getting bit by a fish is the least of they're worries in Mexico, Hop you're ass back across the border and go to an American Hospital,
    The whole getting your head chopped off and hung from the nearest bridge is a hellava lot scarier than gettin' bit by a fish, "Takes longer to heal!"

    "How about this idea, stay here and spend that good money here, hell we need it more than Mexico!"

  4. #24
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    Mexico is Still a Hot Spring Break Destination, Despite Violence

    Published February 17, 2011

    No need to put away that suntan lotion.

    Spring break reservations for Mexico from U.S. college students remain steady, travel industry experts say, despite near-daily reports of drug violence there. Cheap prices in Mexico, a slowly strengthening economy here, the relative safety of many tourist resorts and the fact that the 2009 swine flu pandemic is now all but forgotten are all factors in Mexico's resilience as a spring break destination.

    That's particularly true of Cancún — Mexico's top beach destination, said Patrick Evans of STA Travel, one of the biggest spring break travel agencies.

    "Cancún has always been the most popular among students, and it's still tremendously safe, as long as someone is staying in the resort areas," he said.

    Tens of thousands of high school- and college-age Americans travel to Mexican resort areas during spring break each year.

    This year, reservations for Mexico from students at Oberlin, Baldwin-Wallace and other colleges have been coming in strong for months, said Kim Gray, a travel agent in North Olmsted, Ohio, with Travel Leaders, one of the top 10 travel agencies in the U.S.

    They're heading to Cancún, Playa del Carmen and other destinations on the Riviera Maya, she said.

    "Some of them want to get away from the big crowds of Cancún and spend time in a small town where there's still beautiful beaches," she said.

    The area is far from the U.S. border, where most of the drug violence has taken place, and where the U.S. State Department recently warned students not to travel, said Alfonso Sumano, director of the Americas for the Mexico Tourism Board.

    Also, drug-related violence involving American tourists at beaches and other Mexican tourist destinations is extremely rare, he said.

    Still, Gray said she saw many more guards with machine guns on the streets and beaches during her own trip to the Riviera Maya in November.

    That didn't worry the group of nurses she was traveling with, and it probably won't faze most students, she said.

    "When you're 20 years old, you think you're invincible," Gray said.

    Cabo San Lucas, also a good distance from the border at the lower tip of Baja California, is where Caitlin Cronin, a junior at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz., and her friends are heading this year.

    "I'm not necessarily worried," she said. "And I don't know if that's because I'm naive, or because I just haven't been there in a while."

    However, Acapulco has taken a huge hit in travel reservations due to drug violence, said Jason Chute, the director of operations for StudentCity.com.

    The Pacific coast city, one of Mexico's oldest resort cities and a traditional spring break destination with vibrant nightlife, has seen beheadings and massacres as traffickers fight over turf.

    The State Department noted that Acapulco's violence hasn't been directed at tourists. However, hotel owners and U.S. travel agents say reservations have dropped sharply.

    While the slow U.S. economy was the main factor in drawing some students away from traveling to Mexico last year, near-daily reports of drug violence have hurt some this year, Chute said. As an alternative, some students are seeking package deals for Punta Cana, a beach resort in the Dominican Republic, he said.

    The September attack on American tourist David Hartley and his wife on Falcon Lake, on the Texas-Mexico border, has been particularly damaging to travelers' perception of Mexico, Chute said. Tiffany Hartley said she and her husband were Jet-Skiing in Mexican waters when pirates fired on them, striking her husband and forcing her to flee. His body hasn't been recovered.

    "That was on 'Good Morning America' for a month straight," Chute said. "Stuff like that affects where people are going to go, even though in the tourist zones, we're not seeing that kind of activity."

    Tom Black, a freshman at Arizona State, said he wouldn't even consider traveling to Mexico. The 18-year-old instead is heading to Pennsylvania to visit family.

    "All the stuff you hear about, the violence," he said. "Especially since it could be aimed at Americans and at kids. I think we could be targets."

    Despite that perception, Mexico's Ministry of Tourism said the number of foreign visitors in 2010 exceeded the approximately 22 million travelers who arrived in 2008 — before the outbreak of swine flu in April 2009 left resorts empty for much of the rest of the year.

    The U.S. Commerce Department said visits to Mexico by US residents rose 8 percent during the first six months of 2010 — a period that includes spring break months — compared to the same time period in 2009.

    Much of that has been attributable to the favorable exchange rate and cheaper package deals at Mexican resorts, Travel Leaders spokeswoman Kathy Gerhardt said.

    Most U.S. travelers understand that the violence is confined to specific areas, she said. And a lot of college students, with their fixed income, are attracted to the all-encompassing deals at resorts.

    "It boils down to value overall," Gerhardt said. "People, particularly with the winter we've been having, they're looking for sun and fun and value."

    Based on reporting by The Associated Press.

    Read more: http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/lifest ... z1EPa1zhzZ

  5. #25
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    Guzan said he was taken to a local Mexican hospital, where he was forced to wait hours for care: "They told me my insurance company was 'red-flagged' ... that I would have to pay between $10,000 and $20,000 cash before they would even treat me."

    The hospital claimed that HealthAmerica, Guzan's provider, was blacklisted for not paying on an unrelated case, though HealthAmerica later told Pittsburgh's Channel 4 that the hospital was confusing it with another carrier.

    "Luckily," Guzan said, "I had my parents' platinum credit card with a high limit. The owner of the hospital came down and told me my surgery would be expensive. He said, 'It will be at least $10,000 to start. If you can't do that, if you don't have that, feel free to leave and find another hospital.'"

    I say we adopt the same policy in this country towards mexico's illegal invaders, who single handedly, are a driving force behind American hospitals closing their doors because they don't pay a dime for services!

    EVERY ONE of them should be met in the lobby like this American was in mexico and TOLD: Your treatment is going to be $2000 to see a doctor. That's just for starters. If you cannot pay upfront, you are free to leave and look for another hospital!!

    In this country, the illegal invaders raise hell if they are denied anything! I say we start treating mexican illegals in this country like they treat “gringos
    Pravda v*těz*"

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