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Thread: Asylum requests overwhelm US immigration system: A look at the numbers

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    Asylum requests overwhelm US immigration system: A look at the numbers


    Illegal immigration begins to fall as DHS reveals lower border apprehensions following US-Mexico partnership

    U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Acting Director Ken Cuccinelli says President Trump's tough stance is working but Congress needs to step up and pass legislation to help.

    An explosion in asylum requests from immigrants facing deportation has overwhelmed U.S. courts and denial of the requests does little to keep illegal immigrants out, according to federal statistics.
    Thousands of migrants are hoping to seek asylum, even though experts say they have poor cases and little chance of gaining the status. But that has not stopped hundreds of thousands (possibly millions) of asylum seekers from landing permanently in the U.S., where they live as illegal immigrants, experts say.

    The caravan, and others like it, have put President Trump’s sweeping pledge to secure the border to the test, and dealing with the court backlog and administrative policies is a White House priority. On July 15, the Trump administration announced a new policy tightening restriction for asylum seekers from Central America — a major crackdown that's likely to face a legal challenge in the near future.
    TRUMP ADMINISTRATION ANNOUNCES MAJOR CRACKDOWN ON ASYLUM SEEKERS
    According to a new rule published in the Federal Register, asylum seekers who pass through another country first will be ineligible for asylum at the U.S. southern border. The rule, expected to go into effect on July 16, also applies to children who have crossed the border alone.
    There are some exceptions: If someone has been trafficked, if the country the migrant passed through did not sign one of the major international treaties that govern how refugees are managed (though most Western countries have signed them) or if an asylum-seeker sought protection in a country but was denied, then a migrant could still apply for U.S. asylum.
    Migrants are entitled under both U.S. and international law to apply for asylum. But there already is a bottleneck of would-be asylum seekers waiting at some U.S. border crossings to make their claims, some waiting as long as five weeks. For others, the process could even take years.
    "The reality is that most people in [caravans] will not be found qualified for asylum, and many of them know it. Others are encouraged to, but likely their claims will not pass muster, especially under new guidance from Jeff Sessions, to get back to a stricter adherence to the law," Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies for the Center for Immigration Studies — a Washington, D.C.- based research institution, previously told Fox News.
    Vaughan suggested it would be quicker to process these claims "right away" at the border rather than putting asylum requests on hold.
    During the budget year for 2009, there were 35,811 asylum claims, and 8,384 were granted. During 2018 budget year, there were 162,060 claims filed, and 13,168 were granted.
    Read on for a closer look at immigration, by the numbers.

    327,000

    By the end of March 2019, there were more than 327,000 pending affirmative applications pending with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, according to data provided by the agency. Last year around that time, asylum seekers have to wait around 1,000 days — on average — for their cases to be reviewed in an immigration court, the American Immigration Council reports.

    In this Oct. 23, 2018 image, Ana Delia Soto Duarte, who seeks asylum in the United States from her home in Guerrero, Mexico, waits in hopes of hearing her number called to cross the border in Tijuana, Mexico. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    809,000
    The backlog in the immigration courts has grown significantly in the past five years. In November 2018, there were around 809,000 pending cases on the U.S. immigration court's docket, according to a report by Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse (TRAC) at Syracuse University.
    In 2017 alone, courts fielded around 120,000 asylum requests — four times greater than in 2014 — from immigrants facing deportation, The Washington Post recently reported.
    This recent influx may be due to an increase in credible fear claims in recent years. Immigrants may declare "credible fear" if they are afraid to return to their home country and thus cannot be deported from the U.S. until their asylum application is formally processed.
    "Here are the shocking statistics: in 2009, DHS conducted more than 5,000 credible fear reviews. By 2016, that number had increased to 94,000. The number of these aliens placed in removal proceedings went from fewer than 4,000 in 2009 to more than 73,000 by 2016 — nearly a 19-fold increase — overwhelming the system and leaving those with just claims buried," Attorney General Jeff Sessions said in October 2017, claiming credible fear claims have been "abused" at the border.
    However, The Washington Post noted roughly 76 percent of those who made fear claims in 2016 were found to be credible in interviews — though that doesn't necessarily mean they were granted asylum.
    TRUMP'S BORDER WALL: A LOOK AT THE NUMBERS
    Vaughan said most people pass the "credible fear" test, but only a handful actually gets approved.
    "According to Department of Justice statistics, half of those let in after passing credible fear and released do not even submit the formal asylum application, and half of those who do end up skipping out on the hearings. Of those Central Americans who complete the process, only 20 percent are approved," Vaughan told Fox News.
    She added, "We need to align the credible fear standard more closely with the asylum standard. Even now under Trump 75 [percent] pass credible fear and are allowed in, even though we know they are not likely to qualify or even complete the process."

    65 percent


    In fiscal 2017, Mexico had the highest asylum application denial rate out of 10 nationalities, according to research. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

    In the fiscal year 2018, U.S. immigration courts ruled on more than 42,000 cases, and 65 percent of requests were denied, data obtained by TRAC in November 2018 reveals. According to the research, Mexico had the highest denial rate in 2018 — with courts granting only 14.5 percent of applicants asylum. El Salvadorians had the highest success rate, with 23.5 percent of asylum applicants being approved, the institution reports.

    121,000

    When immigrants sense their asylum request will be denied, they may withdraw from the process and continue living in the U.S. illegally. In fiscal year 2018, there were more than 121,000 removal orders issued by immigration judges, per TRAC. In 2019, TRAC projects the number will rise to nearly 165,000.
    “Saying a few simple words — claiming a fear of return — has transformed a straightforward arrest for illegal entry and immediate return too often into a prolonged legal process, where an alien may be released from custody into the United States and possibly never show up for an immigration hearing,” Sessions said in September 2018, per The Washington Post.

    The Associated Press contributed to the story.

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/immigrati...edium=facebook
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    cbsnews.com

    Trump administration moves to end protections for Central American asylum seekers

    Updated on: July 15, 2019 / 10:33 AM / CBS/AP

    Video at the page link

    The Trump administration on Monday moved to end asylum protections for most Central American migrants in a major escalation of the president's battle to tamp down the number of people crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.

    According to a new rule published in the Federal Register, asylum seekers who pass through another country first will be ineligible for asylum at the U.S. southern border. The rule, expected to go into effect on Tuesday, also applies to children who have crossed the border alone. The new rule will affect asylum seekers coming through Mexico from countries like Guatemala and El Salvador.
    There are some exceptions: If someone has been trafficked, if the country the migrant passed through did not sign one of the major international treaties that govern how refugees are managed (though most Western countries have signed them) or if an asylum-seeker sought protection in a country but was denied, then a migrant could still apply for U.S. asylum.

    But the move by President Trump's administration was meant to essentially end asylum protections as they now are on the southern border. Mr. Trump has long vented his frustrations with the U.S. asylum system, insisting Democrats need to change the laws.
    The policy is almost certain to face a legal challenge, and shortly after the new rule was announced, the American Civil Liberties Union said it intends to sue.
    "The Trump administration is trying to unilaterally reverse our country's legal and moral commitment to protect those fleeing danger. This new rule is patently unlawful and we will sue swiftly," said Lee Gelernt, deputy director of the ACLU's Immigrants' Rights Project.
    U.S. law allows refugees to request asylum when they arrive at the U.S. regardless of how they did so, but there is an exception for those who have come through a country considered to be "safe." But the Immigration and Nationality Act, which governs asylum law, is vague on how a country is determined "safe"; it says "pursuant to a bilateral or multilateral agreement."
    "While the recent supplemental funding was absolutely vital to helping confront the crisis, the truth is that it will not be enough without targeted changes to the legal framework of our immigration system," Acting Homeland Security Secretary Kevin McAleenan said in a statement. "Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major 'pull' factor driving irregular migration to the United States and enable DHS and DOJ to more quickly and efficiently process cases originating from the southern border, leading to fewer individuals transiting through Mexico on a dangerous journey."


    Attorney General William Barr insisted the new rule will "decrease forum shopping by economic migrants and those who seek to exploit our asylum system to obtain entry to the United States—while ensuring that no one is removed from the United States who is more likely than not to be tortured or persecuted on account of a protected ground."
    Right now, the U.S. has such an agreement, known as a "safe third country," only with Canada. Under a recent agreement with Mexico, Central American countries were considering a regional compact on the issue, but nothing has been decided. Guatemalan officials were expected in Washington on Monday, but apparently a meeting between Mr. Trump and Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales was canceled amid a court challenge in Guatemala over whether the country could agree to a safe third with the U.S.

    The new rule also will apply to the initial asylum screening, known as a "credible fear" interview, at which migrants must prove they have credible fears of returning to their home country. It applies to migrants who are arriving to the U.S., not those who are already in the country.
    Trump administration officials say the changes are meant to close the gap between the initial asylum screening that most people pass and the final decision on asylum that most people do not win. But immigrant rights groups, religious leaders and humanitarian groups have said the Republican administration's policies amount to a cruel and calloused effort to keep immigrants out of the country. Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador are poor countries suffering from violence.
    Along with the administration's recent effort to send asylum seekers back over the border, Mr. Trump has tried to deny asylum to anyone crossing the border illegally and restrict who can claim asylum, and Attorney General William Barr recently tried to keep thousands of asylum seekers detained while their cases play out.
    Nearly all of those efforts have been blocked by courts.
    Immigration courts are backlogged by more than 800,000 cases, meaning many people won't have their asylum claims heard for years, despite the fact that more judges are being hired.
    People are generally eligible for asylum in the U.S. if they fear return to their home country because they have been persecuted or have a well-founded fear that they will be persecuted on the basis of race, religion, nationality or membership in a particular social group.
    During the budget year for 2009, there were 35,811 asylum claims, and 8,384 were granted. During 2018 budget year, there were 162,060 claims filed, and 13,168 were granted.
    First published on July 15, 2019 / 9:48 AM

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-administration-moves-to-end-protections-for-central-american-asylum-seekers/?fbclid=IwAR1-OUJAtYUyYzQMWywin19iW3uvN7Lf52GasvpKZhsVyijuCHiWSX zf9pM
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Beezer's Avatar
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    Deport the UACs, the pregnant ones, the sick ones on the spot!

    Fast track them back home!

    We are not the dumping ground for the world.

    We have our own political persecution, violence, rape, murder, drugs, gangs, crime, domestic abuse, poverty, natural disasters, and homeless!!!

    THEY ARE NOT SPECIAL...WE SUFFER THE SAME CRIMES AGAINST US!!!

    NO MORE ASYLUM TO ANYBODY FROM ANYWHERE!!!

    THIS SHIP IS SINKING...START BAILING OUT THE WATER, AND CLOSE THAT DAMN BORDER DOWN!
    TO BECOME AN AMERICAN YOU MUST CHANGE YOUR VALUES ...NOT YOUR LOCATION

    STAY HOME AND BUILD AMERICA ON YOUR SOIL

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    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    Beezer and hattiecat like this.
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