Results 1 to 3 of 3
Like Tree1Likes
  • 1 Post By ALIPAC

Thread: Goodlatte reverses statement on amnesty, again

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

  1. #1
    Administrator Jean's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    65,395

    Goodlatte reverses statement on amnesty, again

    9:28 AM 01/13/2014
    Neil Munro
    The Daily Caller



    House judiciary chairman Rep. Bob Goodlatte has reposted a statement opposing an immigration amnesty that had been previously removed from his website.

    His reversal came two days after the Republican’s base reacted to the news that he had dropped his language against amnesty.

    On Saturday, his staff re-revised his website, which now says, “I remain opposed to amnesty, as I always have been. I do not support a special pathway to citizenship that rewards those who have broken our immigration laws.”

    “Congressman Goodlatte’s website is updated periodically and unfortunately during an update early last year, his position on amnesty was inadvertently deleted,” a Goodlatte aide told The Daily Caller. “However, he is opposed to amnesty and always has been.”

    The restored language is a small symbolic defeat for the progressives and business groups pressuring the GOP to help sharply increase the supply of cheap immigrant labor, and comes just nine days before a critical GOP strategy meeting.

    But Goodlatte’s retreat is only symbolic, because his new language is weaker than his prior language. In April 2013, for example, his website declared that “we must crack down on illegal immigration and enforce our current immigration laws … [and] we must not grant amnesty to individuals who have broken our laws.”

    Also, his new language leaves room for amnesty-like alternatives, such as the award of work-permits and residency — but not a citizenship option — to some or all of the 12 million illegal immigrants in the United States. On Sunday, for example, Goodlatte suggested that an immigration deal could allow illegals to stay and compete for jobs against Americans.

    “I see no reason why we can’t also have an agreement that shows how people who are not lawfully here can be able to be lawfully here — able to live here, work here,” Goodlatte told the pro-immigration interviewing on the Spanish-language TV channel, Telemundo.

    Goodlatte has already won approval from his judiciary committee for a bill that would allow employers to bring in 500,000 foreign guest-workers a year just for jobs in the agriculture and food industries, such as animal slaughterhouses. His district in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley includes an influential poultry industry that relies heavily on low-wage immigrants.

    Under current rules, employers can hire roughly 50,000 foreign temporary agriculture workers annually.

    Goodlatte’s website mentions his support for increased foreign hiring. ”The House Judiciary Committee, which I chair, has held numerous hearings on our immigration laws, and we have already passed several stand-alone bills that address particular issues, like enforcement of immigration laws and guest worker programs, within our immigration system.”

    The agriculture-worker bill is also being criticized by left-wing groups as unfair for workers.

    The Senate’s plan, passed in June, would allow the government to award green cards to 33 million new immigrants, and work-permits to roughly 13 million guest-workers, during the next 10 years.

    That’s more workers than the roughly 28 million teenagers in the United States. Roughly 20 million Americans are unemployed or underemployed, and wages have been stagnant for decades for most Americans.

    GOP leaders are under intense pressure from Wall Street donors and business backers to support an amnesty and to increase the current annual inflow of one million immigrants and 650,000 non-agricultural guest-workers.

    The GOP leadership is expected to unveil their immigration strategy Jan. 24 at the party’s three-day, closed-door strategy meeting at the Greenbriar Resort in West Virginia.

    A group of conservative and centrist GOP legislators are already working to highlight the impact of increased immigration on American workers.

    Opponents of guest-worker programs say they’re worried that the GOP leadership will use the meeting to stampede GOP representatives into backing a set of immigration “principles” that could be later used to cajole them into supporting unpopular bills. The principles are being written with the aid of Rebecca Tallent, a long-time advocate for increased immigrant labor who was recently hired away from the business-backed Bipartisan Policy Center.

    Low-wage immigrant labor provide a critical extra supply of cheap workers for coastal companies seeking to minimize costs and maximize productivity.

    But polls show the effort to bring in foreign workers is unpopular, even among many of the people willing to back a conditional amnesty for the 12 million illegals. The negative reaction is backed by studies and reports, such as a June report by the Congressional Budget Office that said the Senate’s planned increase would shift more of the nation’s income away from workers and towards investors.

    The opposition has hurt GOP advocates. For example, Sen. Marco Rubio’s support among his home-state voters and among the GOP base crashed last year after he led the effort to pass the Senate bill.

    Rubio “is getting destroyed! By Mark Levin, by Rush Limbaugh, and a few others,” pollster Frank Luntz said in April. “He’s trying to find a … solution to immigration that isn’t the traditional Republican approach, and talk radio is killing him,” he added.

    For the moment, political polls show the GOP’s base is eager to vote in the mid-term elections, and swing voters are also supportive.

    Democrats, however, plan to regain support from voters by arguing that the GOP is unfair to workers, and by pushing for a raised $10.10 minimum wage.

    President Barack Obama is also campaigning on the poll-tested claim that GOP policies have expanded the wealth gap between rich and poor since 2000. Many voters and journalists are eager to believe that claim, partly because of the GOP’s image as friendly to big business.

    However, immigration reformers say that large-scale immigration is widening the wealth gap. The wealth gap widened by only 2.4 points in the 36 states with the lowest rate of immigration, but grew by by 4.2 points in the 15 states with the highest levels of immigration, from 2000 to 2010, according to an April 2013 report by FAIR.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/01/13/go...amnesty-again/
    Support our FIGHT AGAINST illegal immigration & Amnesty by joining our E-mail Alerts at https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

  2. #2
    Administrator ALIPAC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Gheen, Minnesota, United States
    Posts
    65,392
    Amnesty is not a 'special path to citizenship' it is any path to citizenship for illegal aliens you morons!

    W
    imblest likes this.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Newmexican's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    35,837
    GOP leader reveals strategy for immigration bill push

    4:04 PM 01/13/2014
    Neil Munro
    White House Correspondent

    The GOP’s leadership will try to persuade GOP legislators to back an immigration plan that includes tighter enforcement, an effective amnesty for 12 million people and more immigrant workers, according to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte.

    “We’re trying to find a way to give the members of the House a way to see how all these things would work in our step by step approach. … Finding a way to build that consensus is critical,” Goodlatte told an interviewer Sunday on the Spanish-language Telemundo network.

    But Goodlatte acknowledged deep GOP opposition to the plan, and indicated that the leadership won’t push a plan in the face of broad opposition in the caucus.
    “We have to have something where a sizable majority of Republicans can support it,” he said.

    GOP legislators will likely be pressed to support the series of immigration bills at a closed-door strategy session in West Virginia, starting Jan. 23.

    However, Goodlatte and the interviewer, Jose Diaz-Balart — the brother of Florida GOP Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart — largely ignored the most contentious issue, which is industry’s demand for an increased inflow of foreign low-wage workers.

    The Senate’s June bill would triple legal immigration over the next decade, by awarding green cards to 33 million immigrants and work permits to roughly 13 million guest workers. That influx would be larger than the 28 million teenagers in the country, and also larger than the pool of 20 million unemployed and underemployed Americans.
    Any House bill would have to be merged with the demands of Senate Democrats before it could be signed by Obama. The president and his aides have said an immigration increase is one of his highest second-term priorities.

    Goodlatte has won committee approval for a bill that would allow food-industry companies to hire 500,000 guest-workers a year.

    Since last year, influential business donors — such as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg — and progressive advocates have played up the unpopular amnesty issue, so minimizing media coverage of the very unpopular effort to increase low-wage immigrant labor.

    The political obstacles described by Goodlatte include intense public suspicion of President Barack Obama’s willingness to enforce parts of any immigration deal that he does not like.

    “There have been — not just with this president — but a history of presidents not enforcing our immigration laws,” he said.

    There “has to be an agreement that there’s not going to be a future wave of illegal immigration. … That is difficult to bring together,” he said, citing the 1986 amnesty bill that yielded three million legal immigrants and many millions of illegal immigrants.

    The distrust is boosted by the president’s unilateral change to the 2010 Obamacare law, Goodlatte said. GOP legislators see “a president who steps in and says, ‘You know what? That didn’t quite work out the way I wanted so I’m gonna change this. Or I’m gonna change that.’ But he doesn’t have the authority,” Goodlatte said.

    One fix would be legislative language granting greater enforcement authority to the states, he said. ”That’s why we think there needs to be, for example, involvement by the states and local governments, not just the federal government, in dealing with the issue,” he said.

    The deal could delay some benefits to the 12 million illegal immigrants — such as “legal status” — until the government has established some system that lets companies determine if a proposed hire is a citizen or a residents or a legal guest worker, he said.
    “We can say the legal status is not provided until things like employment verification — electronic employment verification or entry/exit visa programs are up and operating effectively,” he said.

    Goodlatte should get some credit for his emphasis on boosting security inside the country, not just at the border, said Roy Beck, the founder of NumbersUSA, a group that pushes for low immigration levels. He is also right to be skeptical of presidents’ willingness to enforce laws, said Beck.

    Goodlatte, however, also endorsed an amnesty and more foreign workers, said Beck. “He didn’t show any concern for American workers and the reason you have immigration laws is to protect workers and the unemployed,” Beck said.

    Goodlatte is under intense pressure from House Speaker John Boehner who is trying to pass an amnesty-and-guest-worker bill, so “we don’t know where the real Bob Goodlatte is,” Beck said.

    In his TV interview, Goodlatte didn’t use the word “amnesty.” The word spikes public opposition to the planned deal, according to focus groups run by consultants such as Frank Luntz.

    Instead, Goodlatte described the proposed amnesty as “an agreement that there’s going to be a legal status for people who are already here.”

    Current political polls show the GOP’s base is eager to vote in the midterm elections, and swing voters are backing the GOP.

    Democrats, however, plan to regain support from voters by arguing that the GOP is unfair to American workers, and by pushing for a raised $10.10 minimum wage. Obama is also claiming that GOP policies have expanded the wealth gap between rich and poor since 2000. Many voters and journalists are eager to believe that claim, partly because of the GOP’s image as friendly to big business.

    However, immigration reformers say that large-scale immigration is widening the wealth gap. The gap widened by only 2.4 points in the 36 states with the lowest rate of immigration, but grew by by 4.2 points in the 15 states with the highest levels of immigration, from 2000 to 2010, according to an April 2013 report by FAIR.

    However, Goodlatte indicated that the GOP leadership is going to push the guest-worker and amnesty plan.

    “We’re working on it,” Goodlatte said.

    http://dailycaller.com/2014/01/13/go...ion-bill-push/




Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •