Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

  1. #1
    Senior Member American-ized's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Monroe County, New York
    Posts
    3,530

    FL-25 new U.S. citizens take their oaths at grand opening of

    25 new U.S. citizens take their oaths at grand opening of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services office in Royal Palm Beach

    By DIANNA SMITH
    Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
    Thursday, August 13, 2009

    ROYAL PALM BEACH — It took him 30 years to get here.

    After Kalvin Berice Lindo became an American citizen on Thursday, he kissed his crying wife, took a deep breath and said, "I finally feel like I'm part of the world."

    The 55-year-old man, originally from Jamaica, stood proudly with 24 others as they vowed to be great Americans. And though naturalization ceremonies take place at least twice a week in Palm Beach County, this ceremony was even more special because it took place at the grand opening of the new U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services building on Belvedere Road in Royal Palm Beach.

    U.S. Rep Ron Klein, D-Boca Raton, and newly inducted USCIS director Alejandro Mayorkas were on hand for the traditional ribbon-cutting ceremony and to congratulate the 25 for their accomplishments.

    "It's a wonderful moment you'll remember forever," Klein said. "You have a special responsibility to take it upon yourself to make our country stronger and better."

    The 38,000 square foot building, which opened in March, is expected to process 57,000 customers a year. More than one million people become U.S. citizens each year and about 8,000 of those become citizens here in Palm Beach County, said Sharon Scheidhauer, USCIS spokeswoman.

    Martino Bologna, 51, of Boca Raton, also became a citizen on Thursday. He planned to spend the rest of the afternoon framing his flag and the certificate he's been longing for.

    Bologna was born in Italy and came to America in 1971.

    "This country has been so kind," he said. "There are a lot of places in the world where people are not free. We have a lot of freedom here."

    Lindo, who lives with his wife, Gingerlee, in Sebring, works as a superintendent for a construction company. He rarely takes time off work, but this week, he said he took Thursday and today: Thursday because he reached his dream of becoming an American; today, because he will register to vote.

    "There's no place else but where I am right now," Lindo said after the ceremony. "It means everything to me."

    http://www.palmbeachpost.com/services/c ... =ynews_rss

  2. #2
    Senior Member builditnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    A Midwest State in North AmeXica
    Posts
    1,845
    After Kalvin Berice Lindo became an American citizen on Thursday, he kissed his crying wife, took a deep breath and said, "I finally feel like I'm part of the world."
    Huh? He didn't feel he was "part of the world" until this day? Where do people get this kind of stuff?

    U.S. Rep Ron Klein, D-Boca Raton, and newly inducted USCIS director Alejandro Mayorkas were on hand for the traditional ribbon-cutting ceremony and to congratulate the 25 for their accomplishments.
    Just curious if this new USCIS director, Alejandro Mayorkas, if he was actually born in the US? And actually to legal citizen parents, and not an anchor baby? Or is that impossible to hope for, because that would just NOT be politically correct enough?
    <div>Number*U.S. military*in S.Korea to protect their border with N.Korea: 28,000. Number*U.S. military*on 2000 mile*U.S. southern border to protect ourselves from*the war in our own backyard: 1,200 National Guard.</

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Newmexican's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    35,837
    Congratulations!! to the people that followed the LAW.
    Support our FIGHT AGAINST illegal immigration & Amnesty by joining our E-mail Alerts at https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

  4. #4
    Senior Member builditnow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    A Midwest State in North AmeXica
    Posts
    1,845
    Wish I hadn't become so jaded by the illegal invasion that I could still be happy about legal immigrants. I personally think the illegal imm problem is so out of control, we need a temporary moratorium on legal immigration.

    If the legal immigrants truly did it totally legally from beginning to end, thats good. But I can't help but wonder how many of them became citizens because of the anchor baby and chain migration policies. How many of them came illegally, had anchor babies, then anchor baby kids later sponsored them to become legal residents, then citizens? How many of them became legal residents because of the first amnesty in 1986, then later became citizens?

    I recently read that not only are the majority of illegal immigrants from Mexico, but so are the majority of legal immigrants from Mexico. Why is that? What happened to "diversity" in our immigration system? The immigration lottery is supposed to be spread to several different countries. Why would the majority be from Mexico?

    (I'm pretty sure this was in an article posted here, and was written by either Pat Buchanan or Mr. Krikorian (sp?). I will try to search and locate it. I know I'm not imaging it, because I was surprised that the majority of legal imm are ALSO from Mexico.)
    <div>Number*U.S. military*in S.Korea to protect their border with N.Korea: 28,000. Number*U.S. military*on 2000 mile*U.S. southern border to protect ourselves from*the war in our own backyard: 1,200 National Guard.</

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •