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Thread: 'Kissing bug' disease has infected OVER 300,000 people in the US...most of whom don't

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  1. #1
    Super Moderator Newmexican's Avatar
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    'Kissing bug' disease has infected OVER 300,000 people in the US...most of whom don't

    This would not be here if the immigration laws were enforced and the medical assessments done.
    'Kissing bug' disease has infected OVER 300,000 people in the US...most of whom don't know they have the parasite referred to as 'the new AIDS'



    • Over 300,000 Americans have already been infected with the potentially fatal 'kissing bug disease' called Chagas
    • Chagas is being called the new AIDS because of its asymptomatic beginnings that can turn to a fatal end if the disease progresses
    • Many doctors aren't aware of the prevalence of Chagas and aren't testing people for the disease

    By ALEXANDRA KLAUSNER FOR MAILONLINE
    PUBLISHED: 22:10 EST, 8 November 2014

    Over 300,000 Americans have already been infected with the potentially fatal 'kissing bug disease' called Chagas but U.S. healthcare workers lack of knowledge about the illness is letting many cases of the parasite unnoticed. Some doctors are calling it the 'new AIDS' because of the way it develops.

    Researchers who gathered on Tuesday at the annual American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene meeting in New Orleans said that if caught early the disease can be cured however sometimes the disease can be asymptomatic and there is a dearth in medication for the condition.

    The CDC reports that the initial symptoms of the disease caused by a parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, which is spread through the feces of kissing bugs includes fever, fatigue, body aches, rash, diarrhea and vomiting. One of the first visual signs can be a skin lesion or a purplish swelling of the lid of one eye.

    The disease can develop in the body causing eventual heart failure and other deadly complications that by the time they are realized cannot be helped with medicine.



    Symptoms: One of the first visible signs can be a skin lesion or a purplish swelling of the lids of one eye

    Chagas is being called the new AIDS because of its asymptomatic beginnings that can turn to a fatal end if the disease progresses.

    'We were astonished to not only find such a high rate of individuals testing positive for Chagas in their blood, but also high rates of heart disease that appear to be Chagas-related,' said Nolan Garcia, an epidemiologist at the Baylor College of Medicine.

    The CDC has said that they believe most of the people infected with Chagas got the parasite in Mexico or South America before coming to the U.S.

    The Food and Drug Administration has not yet approved two medicines called nifurtimox and benznidazole that are currently used to treat.

    The medications also put people at risk for the disease nerve damage, nausea and weight loss, reports Aljazeera.
    The CDC only makes the drugs available when no alternatives exist.

    'The disease can be fatal if not treated,' said Melissa Nolan Garcia, a research associate at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and co-author of a separate study on Chagas disease in Texas published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene on Tuesday.

    'You are normally asymptomatic until disease has progressed at which time treatment is not helpful. We call this the silent disease,' Garcia said.

    'The concerning thing is that majority of the patients [I spoke to] are going to physicians, and the physicians are telling them, ‘No you don’t have the disease,’ she said.



    Kissing bug: Chagas is caused by a parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, which is spread through the feces of kissing bugs(pictured) and is making its way into the U.S.


    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz3IXZaBiOV
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    Super Moderator Newmexican's Avatar
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    • THIS IS TERRIFYING NOVEMBER 7


    Killer disease from the 'kissing bug' is making its way through Texas

    iStock


    Add this to the list of maladies that will keep you up at night: Chagas — also known as the "kissing bug" disease — is a parasitic infection that researchers say is easier to get in the United States than originally believed.

    Chagas can be difficult to detect in its early stages, but if left untreated can cause cardiac and intestinal trouble, or even death. To add to the nightmare, it's spread by kissing bugs finding victims at night and sucking blood from their faces.

    It was thought that most people in the U.S. who caught the disease were infected while traveling abroad — likely in Mexico, Central America, or South America. Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston followed 17 area residents who had Chagas, and found that at least six were most likely infected locally. Most of the patients lived in rural areas or spent a lot of time outside, and of the 40 kissing bugs collected in central-southern Texas, half had fed on human blood.

    The researchers also studied blood donations between 2008 and 2012, and found 1 in every 6,500 samples tested positive for exposure to the parasite, a number 50 times higher than what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention thought. Epidemiologist Melissa Nolan Garcia said she and her fellow Baylor researchers "were astonished to not only find such a high rate of individuals testing positive for Chagas in their blood, but also high rates of heart disease that appear to be Chagas-related."

    - - Catherine Garcia
    http://theweek.com/speedreads/index/...-through-texas

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    Senior Member vistalad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newmexican View Post
    'We were astonished to not only find such a high rate of individuals testing positive for Chagas in their blood, but also high rates of heart disease that appear to be Chagas-related,' said Nolan Garcia, an epidemiologist at the Baylor College of Medicine.

    The CDC has said that they believe most of the people infected with Chagas got the parasite in Mexico or South America before coming to the U.S.
    The new majority in Congress needs to know about this ASAP.
    **************************************
    Americans first in this magnificent country

    American jobs for American workers

    Fair trade, not free trade
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    Bad enough they brought bed bugs, now another scurge and they just took in 10,000 unaccompanied minors at the border and are dispersing them around the state or states - they do not show up for hearings months later too. Our personnel have to look for a relative in the US - that is crazy - turn them around for many reasons but especially disease......
    also a study shows deltamethrin (one of a group of pesticides called pyrethroids) can interfere with dopamine function in the brain and cause problems with hyperactivity, memory, ability to focus and the control of impulsive behavior - ADHD kids & pregnant women caution.
    http://easyhealthoptions.com/household-chemical-messes-kids-brains/

    300,000 cases of Chagas reported in U.S.


    'We're unwilling to stop illegals who are bringing this disease across'

    By Paul Bremmer

    A hazardous insect from Latin America known as the triatomine bug, or “kissing bug,” has found its way to more than half the United States, serving as a reminder that a porous border lets in more than just human beings.

    “We have a border security problem, no question about that, and part of the border security problem is a significant health problem,” said Dr. Lee Hieb, an orthopedic surgeon and past president of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons.

    The kissing bug has been known to carry a parasite that causes Chagas disease, which can be fatal if left untreated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says there are currently about 300,000 cases of Chagas in the U.S., but most of those people were infected in Latin America.

    Dr. Jane Orient, executive director of the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons, made a connection between the large immigrant influx from Latin America and the appearance of the triatomine bug in 28 different states.

    “I think that if we have a lot more people coming from endemic areas into the United States, and they’re not being screened for this, and they’re going to an area where there’s the vector, then the chances are that the disease will be spreading more inside the United States,” Orient told WND.

    Hieb, author of “Surviving the Medical Meltdown: Your Guide to Living Through the Disaster of Obamacare,” agreed with her fellow doctor that a lack of screening for Chagas is a problem. She asserted it’s necessary to intercept border-crossers who may spread Chagas to protect the public health.

    “We’re unwilling to stop illegals who are bringing this disease across, so I guess I would say that’s the big lesson here, that they shouldn’t be surprised. Until they stop the source, it’s not going to go away,” Hieb told WND.
    Hieb, who has criticized vaccines in the past, added, “It’s ironic that we’re more worried about vaccinating Americans than we are about looking at the root cause of these diseases coming through.”

    By way of background, kissing bugs transmit Chagas disease to humans and other mammals through their feces. The insect sucks a person’s blood and defecates near the wound, and the parasite enters the human’s body if the fecal matter gets rubbed into a break in the skin or a mucous membrane, such as the eye or mouth. The CDC says not all triatomine bugs carry the parasite that causes Chagas, and thus the likelihood of a human actually contracting Chagas from such a bug is low.

    Chagas disease is much more common in Latin American countries, where triatomine bugs often live in the cracks and holes of substandard housing, according to the CDC. Chagas infects roughly 9 million people in the Western Hemisphere, mostly in impoverished areas of Argentina, Brazil and Mexico.

    And yet, 300,000 people are currently infected in the United States. The kissing bug has been found in 28 states, mostly in the southern half of the country. Orient said while Americans should not stay awake at night worrying about a Chagas infection, they need to be aware it is here in the country – and symptoms sometimes do not show up for years.

    “I’m not going to ring alarm bells and say, ‘Everyone go out and get tested for Chagas,’ but we should be aware of this and it’s just one of the many consequences of not doing public health screening on people who are entering our country from countries that are severely impoverished and have a lot of diseases that we’re not familiar with here,” Orient said.

    Hieb, for her part, pointed out Chagas disease is likely to impact far more Americans than those who are infected, when one considers where the infected people are coming from.

    “If you let people in who are sick with bad diseases – these are people that are not employed, these are people that don’t have insurance – they’re not going to care for themselves; the American public’s going to care for them,” Hieb reasoned.

    “Obamacare’s already a disaster. How can we, in good conscience, say the American taxpayer is deserving of taking care of all the world’s sick? Nobody can do that. So what it’s going to degrade is our own health care.”

    http://www.wnd.com/2015/12/300000-ca...-u-s/?AID=7236
    Last edited by artist; 12-13-2015 at 01:50 PM.
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  5. #5
    Super Moderator Newmexican's Avatar
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    SHOCK REPORT: Dangerous Chagas Disease – Imported from Latin America – Widespread in Southern US

    Jim Hoft Dec 2nd, 2015 8:26 am

    Thanks to Obama’s open border policies there are now hundreds of thousands of cases of Chagas Disease in the United States today.

    This tropical disease is extremely dangerous!



    Chagas disease
    , also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is found mainly in endemic areas of 21 Latin American countries. The disease is transmitted to humans by contact with feces of triatomine bugs, known as ‘kissing bugs.’



    Chagas Disease is spread by the Kissing Bug in Latin American countries. Chagas often leads to a fatal condition known as Chagasic cardiomyopathy.

    The National School for Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine released a list of facts on Chagas Disease.

    According to this prestigious school of medicine there are an estimated 300,000 cases of Chagas disease in the United States today with a high level of cases in Texas. The disease was mostly imported from Latin America.

    Via VDare:

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a serious infection caused by a parasitic microorganism, Trypanosoma cruzi, and is transmitted by kissing bugs.
    Chagas disease is a leading cause of heart disease resulting in a debilitating and often fatal condition known as Chagasic cardiomyopathy. One in six people with Chagasic cardiomyopathy will die within five years.

    An estimated 9 million people are infected in the Western Hemisphere, mostly in impoverished areas. According to the World Health Organization, the largest number of people living with Chagas disease are in poor areas of Argentina, Brazil and Mexico, while Bolivia has the highest prevalence (percentage of people infected).

    The infection can be passed from mother to baby. There are an estimated 40,000 pregnant women in North America alone who have Chagas, and they will transmit the infection to their babies around 5 percent of the time.

    The CDC estimates that 300,000 cases occur in the United States, mostly imported from Latin America.

    Scientists at the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor, including Drs. Kristy Murray and Melissa Nolan Garcia, have uncovered a previously unrecognized level of transmission in the state of Texas.


    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2015...n-southern-us/


  6. #6
    Super Moderator Newmexican's Avatar
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    Parasites - American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease)







    Triatomine Bug FAQs




    On this Page









    What is a triatomine bug and what does it look like?

    Triatomine bugs are a type of reduviid bug that can carry the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi that causes Chagas disease.
    Various triatomine bugs in all life stages, from eggs to nymphs to fully grown adults. A variety of bug species, that share similar traits, are pictured. Larger Picture



    Where are triatomine bugs typically found?

    Triatomine bugs (also called reduviid bugs, "kissing" bugs, assassin bugs, cone-nosed bugs, and blood suckers) can live indoors, in cracks and holes of substandard housing, or in a variety of outdoor settings including:

    • Beneath porches
    • Between rocky structures
    • Under cement
    • In rock, wood, brush piles, or beneath bark
    • In rodent nests or animal burrows
    • In outdoor dog houses or kennels
    • In chicken coops or houses

    They are typically found in the southern United States, Mexico, Central America, and South America (as far south as southern Argentina). The map below details triatomine occurrence by U.S. state.
    Triatomine Bug Occurrence by State

    Eleven different species of triatomine bugs have been found in the southern United States:









    Triatomines are primarily nocturnal and feed on the blood of mammals (including humans), birds, and reptiles. Triatomine bugs live in a wide range of environmental settings, generally within close proximity to a blood host. In areas of Latin America where human Chagas disease is an important public health problem, the bugs nest in cracks and holes of substandard housing.
    Because most indoor structures in the United States are built with plastered walls and sealed entryways to prevent insect invasion, triatomine bugs rarely infest indoor areas of houses. Discovery of immature stages of the bug (wingless, smaller nymphs) inside may be an indication of infestation. When the bugs are found inside, they are likely to be in one of the following settings:

    • Near pet resting areas
    • In areas of rodent infestation
    • In and around beds and bedrooms, especially under or near mattresses or night stands

    How can I keep triatomine bugs away from my home?

    Synthetic pyrethroid sprays have been used successfully in Latin America to eliminate house infestations. Although similar chemicals are available in the United States, none have been specifically approved for use against triatomine bugs. A licensed pest control operator should be consulted if considering the use of insecticides. Please note that roach hotels or other "bait" formulations do not work against triatomine bugs. Long lasting insecticide treated bednets and curtains have been shown to kill these bugs.
    Other precautions to prevent house infestation include:

    • Sealing cracks and gaps around windows, walls, roofs, and doors
    • Removing wood, brush, and rock piles near your house
    • Using screens on doors and windows and repairing any holes or tears
    • If possible, making sure yard lights are not close to your house (lights can attract the bugs)
    • Sealing holes and cracks leading to the attic, crawl spaces below the house, and to the outside
    • Having pets sleep indoors, especially at night
    • Keeping your house and any outdoor pet resting areas clean, in addition to periodically checking both areas for the presence of bugs

    Triatoma sanguisuga Photo Courtesy: James Gathany
    Triatoma gerstaeckeri next to a penny for scale. Photo courtesy S. Kjos.
    Triatoma protracta Photo Courtesy: James Gathany




    How can I tell if the bug I’ve found is a triatomine and not another kind of bug?

    There are many beetles and non-triatomine reduviid bugs that resemble the triatomine bug. Two examples of non-triatomine reduviid bugs that do not feed on human blood are the wheel bugand the assassin bug. Some plant-feeding bugs, such as Coreidae, also resemble the triatomine. If you are unsure if the bug you’ve found is a triatomine, you may wish to consult with an expert, such as an entomologist, for clarification.
    More on: Bugs Commonly Confused with Triatomine Bugs

    Can I get Chagas disease from a triatomine bug?

    Yes. However, the transmission of Chagas disease from a bug to a human is not easy. The parasite that causes the disease is in the bug feces. The bug generally defecates on or near a person while it is feeding on his or her blood, generally when the person is sleeping. Transmission occurs when fecal material gets rubbed into the bite wound or into a mucous membrane (for example, the eye or mouth), and the parasite enters the body.
    It is important to note that not all triatomine bugs are infected with the parasite that causes Chagas disease. The likelihood of getting Chagas disease from a triatomine bug in the United States is low, even if the bug is infected.



    Could I be allergic to the bite of a triatomine bug?

    Romaña's sign, the swelling of the child's eyelid, is a marker of acute Chagas disease. The swelling is due to bug feces being accidentally rubbed into the eye, or because the bite wound was on the same side of the child's face as the swelling. Photo courtesy of WHO/TDR.



    Yes. The saliva of certain types of triatomines can cause an allergic reaction in some people. An allergic reaction may be characterized by severe redness, itching, swelling, welts, hives, or, rarely, anaphylactic shock (severe allergic reaction). Persons at risk of anaphylactic shock should consult a physician to obtain medication to use in case of a bite. It is important to note that not all triatomines are infected with the parasite even though they may cause an allergic reaction.
    The appearance of an allergic reaction after a triatomine bite does not mean that you have been infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. The mild swelling that may develop at the site of parasite inoculation (where the parasite entered the body through the skin or mucous membranes) is called a chagoma. When the parasite enters the body through the conjunctiva of the eye, the swelling around the eye is called Romaña’s sign. Chagomas, including Romaña’s sign, usually last longer than an allergic reaction and are less likely to be severely itchy.

    What do I do if I think I may have acquired Chagas disease?

    If you suspect you have Chagas disease, consult your health care provider. Or, to find a physician familiar with diagnosis and treatment of Chagas disease and other parasitic infections, ask your general practitioner or primary care physician for a referral. You may wish to consider visiting a physician who specializes in infectious diseases. To locate a clinician in your area, please visit the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene’s Clinical Consultants Directory .

    http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/gen_info/vectors/








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