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  1. #1
    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    LA Times Complains About Increasing Homelessness IN MEXICO! Ignores US Homeless Camps



    CLUELESS LA Times Complains About Increasing Homelessness IN MEXICO! ó Ignores US Homeless Camps in Their Own Neighborhood!

    June 14, 2019, 10:22 am by Nan and Byron McKeeby 88 Comments



    TRUMP IS WINNING for America! Mexico is finally starting to police their own borders thanks to American tariff threats.

    In recent weeks, Mexican authorities have set up immigration checkpoints along the main northbound highway and have been aggressively detaining and deporting thousands of migrants.

    The law enforcement squeeze seems destined to tighten with Mexicoís vow to deploy about 6,000 national guard forces to its southern border as part of a deal reached last week with the Trump administration to avert U.S. tariffs.
    Mexico has 45 days to demonstrate that the northbound flows of migrants are declining, or the two sides go back to the negotiating table, with Mexico in a weakened position, Marcelo Ebrard, the countryís foreign secretary, said Tuesday.


    WINNING! But the LA Times canít let their readers focus on the fact that Trump was 100% correct while Democrats and RINOs were 100% wrong.


    The completely clueless LA Times is very concerned about the homeless camps in MEXICO!
    The article pivots focuses on the increasing problem of homelessness in Mexico as a result of Americaís crackdown on illegal immigration.

    At Mexicoís southern border, migrants feel the pinch of a crackdown spurred by U.S.
    Long lines of migrants, mostly Central Americans, line up daily outside the Tapachula offices of the refugee agencies of Mexico and the United Nations.

    Meanwhile, a polyglot throng including people from Africa, Asia and the Caribbean regularly gathers at the local headquarters of the National Institute of Immigration, Mexicoís agency for migrant affairs.
    Almost all those seeking help have a common destination ó the United States ó but they find themselves caught in an expanding Mexican immigration crackdown prompted by U.S. pressure and marooned in this sweltering city in southern Mexico.
    Funny that this ďpolyglotĒ has gotten the idea that Mexico is their ticket into America. Howíd that happen?
    They cannot proceed north without risking arrest, so they remain in Tapachula seeking documentation allowing legal travel to the U.S.-Mexico border, more than 1,000 miles away. They say they are fleeing poverty and violence in their homelands.

    Yeah, we have poverty and violence here too, soÖ.
    Hereís where the article goes for the emotional jugular:

    Migrants unable to find shelter sleep in the street outside the offices of the Mexican Commission for Refugee Assistance in Tapachula, Mexico, on June 12, 2019. (Rebecca Blackwell / Associated Press)

    Thatís a bummer, but guess what? We have a problem with homeless AMERICAN CITIZENS. Many of them Vets, women and children.

    Facts:

    In LA alone, over 56,000 homeless Americans are living on the streets

    That includes 11,000+ veterans

    So why did California just pass a bill allotting $100,000,000 for free healthcare for illegal aliens?

    Why isn't Kamala Harris putting Americans first in her state?

    19.1K people are talking about this


    The LA Times and Democrats think itís appropriate to demand housing and healthcare for illegals while Americans sleep on the sidewalks outside the LA Times office building.
    You donít have to walk more than 2 blocks outside the LA Times HQ to find more than a dozen AMERICAN citizens homeless on the street, yet they somehow think itís Americaís responsibility to take in OTHER countryís homeless, and house them immediately.




    Bright Start News @BRIGHTstrt

    You don't have to walk more than 2 blocks outside the LA Times HQ to find more than a dozen AMERICAN citizens homeless on the street, yet they somehow think it's America's responsibility to take in OTHER country's homeless, and house them immediately.

    12

    10:20 AM - Jun 14, 2019

    LA homelessness has exploded by 36% in the last year.



    YouTube Video https://youtu.be/cB0Eu-v1t9s

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/201...-neighborhood/
    If you're gonna fight, fight like you're the third monkey on the ramp to Noah's Ark... and brother its starting to rain. Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  2. #2
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


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  3. #3
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    L.A. Allocates Millions Toward Homelessness Projects

    posted by City News Service - Jun 14, 2019



    LOS ANGELES (CNS) - The Los Angeles City Council today doled out millions of dollars for various homeless services projects, including a temporary bridge housing facility in San Pedro and improved access to restrooms and showers for people living on Skid Row.

    The council voted unanimously to allocate roughly $2.7 million toward Skid Row-area services, while also routing $7.1 million toward the A Bridge Home housing site at 515 N. Beacon St. in San Pedro and $13.1 million to cover increased costs of other temporary housing facilities across the city.


    For Skid Row, the council allocated $2.7 million in state Homeless Emergency Aid Program funds to provide expanded access to showers and restrooms at St. Vincent de Paul and The People Concern facilities; improvements at The Bin storage-space facility; deployment of two more Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Homeless Engagement Teams; addition of at least five drinking fountains located with attended public toilets; and collection boxes aimed at reducing improper disposal of hazardous materials.


    City Councilman Jose Huizar, whose district includes parts of the downtown area and Skid Row, introduced a motion Friday calling for another $2.8 million allocation of state grant funds for bathrooms, water stations and storage facilities in the Skid Row area.


    ``During the day, we have about 4,000 to 5,000 people walking around Skid Row, looking for services,'' Huizar said. ``At nighttime, 2,000 people live on the streets in Skid Row. You can't find that anywhere else in the country but here in Los Angeles. For too many years, we've not had the urgency that we should apply to Skid Row and address this humanitarian crisis.''


    Last year, Huizar requested that $20 million in the state grant funds be allocated to Skid Row, out of the overall $85 million the city received. Before Friday's vote, the city had allocated about $5.6 million of that funding for Skid Row, according to the city. In January, about $1.3 million of that allocation was approved for a three-year lease, services and 119 beds for the bridge housing site at Paloma Street, as well as $350,000 for an overnight shelter at the Downtown Women's Center.


    If the council approves Huizar's latest request for another $2.8 million, it will raise the overall amount allocated to Skid Row to about $11 million, with about $9 million more expected to be designated in the coming months. Huizar said he hopes to get an additional $20 million in state funding for Skid Row support and service programs.


    ``This is not even beginning to scratch at the surface,'' he said. ``We need a lot more support. This city needs to allocate the additional funding immediately and put the infrastructure in place to be able to put that money to action.''


    Another motion introduced by Huizar Friday called for the relocation of an already operating shower facility to Skid Row. He introduced a motion earlier this week asking the city to work with LAHSA to consider establishing another bridge housing site near St. Barnabas Episcopal Church at 2109 Chickasaw Ave.

    https://kfiam640.iheart.com/content/...ness-projects/
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


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  4. #4
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


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  5. #5
    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    Drugs are still being pumped acoss the border



    city-journal.org

    An Addiction Crisis Disguised as a Housing Crisis
    Opioids are fueling homelessness on the West Coast.


    Christopher F. Rufo
    June 14, 2019
    The Social Order

    California


    By latest count, some 109,089 men and women are sleeping on the streets of major cities in California, Oregon, and Washington. The homelessness crisis in these cities has generated headlines and speculation about “root causes.” Progressive political activists allege that tech companies have inflated housing costs and forced middle-class people onto the streets. Declaring that “no two people living on Skid Row . . . ended up there for the same reasons,” Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti, for his part, blames a housing shortage, stagnant wages, cuts to mental health services, domestic and sexual abuse, shortcomings in criminal justice, and a lack of resources for veterans. These factors may all have played a role, but the most pervasive cause of West Coast homelessness is clear: heroin, fentanyl, and synthetic opioids.
    Homelessness is an addiction crisis disguised as a housing crisis. In Seattle, prosecutors and law enforcement recently estimated that the majority of the region’s homeless population is hooked on opioids, including heroin and fentanyl. If this figure holds constant throughout the West Coast, then at least 11,000 homeless opioid addicts live in Washington, 7,000 live in Oregon, and 65,000 live in California (concentrated mostly in San Francisco and Los Angeles). For the unsheltered population inhabiting tents, cars, and RVs, the opioid-addiction percentages are even higher—the City of Seattle’s homeless-outreach team estimates that 80 percent of the unsheltered population has a substance-abuse disorder. Officers must clean up used needles in almost all the homeless encampments.

    For drug cartels and low-level street dealers, the business of supplying homeless addicts with heroin, fentanyl, and other synthetic opioids is extremely lucrative. According to the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the average heavy-opioid user consumes $1,834 in drugs per month. Holding rates constant, we can project that the total business of supplying heroin and other opioids to the West Coast’s homeless population is more than $1.8 billion per year. In effect, Mexican cartels, Chinese fentanyl suppliers, and local criminal networks profit off the misery of the homeless and offload the consequences onto local governments struggling to get people off the streets.

    West Coast cities are seeing a crime spike associated with homeless opioid addicts. In Seattle, police busted two sophisticated criminal rings engaged in “predatory drug dealing” in homeless encampments (they were found in possession of $20,000 in cash, heroin, firearms, knives, machetes, and a sword). Police believe that “apartments were serving as a base of operations that supplied drugs to the streets, and facilitated the collection and resale of stolen property.” In other words, drug dealers were exploiting homeless addicts and using the city’s maze of illegal encampments as distribution centers. In my own Fremont neighborhood, where property crime has surged 57 percent over the past two years, local business owners have formed a group to monitor a network of RVs that circulate around the area to deal heroin, fentanyl, and methamphetamines. Dealers have become brazen—one recently hung up a spray-painted sign on the side of his RV with the message: “Buy Drugs Here!”

    What are local governments doing to address this problem? To a large extent, they have adopted a strategy of deflection, obfuscation, and denial. In her #SeattleForAll public relations campaign, Mayor Jenny Durkan insists that only one in three homeless people struggle with substance abuse, understating the figures of her own police department as well as the city attorney, who has claimed that the real numbers, just for opioid addiction, rise to 80 percent of the unsheltered.

    The consequences of such denial have proved disastrous: no city on the West Coast has a solution for homeless opioid addicts. Los Angeles, which spent $619 million on homelessness last year, has adopted a strategy of palliative care—keeping addicts alive through distribution of the overdose drug naloxone—but fails to provide access to on-demand detox, rehabilitation, and recovery programs that might help people overcome their addictions. The city has been cursed, in this sense, with temperate weather, compounded by permissive policies toward public camping and drug consumption that have attracted 20,687 homeless individuals from outside Los Angeles County.

    No matter how much local governments pour into affordable-housing projects, homeless opioid addicts—nearly all unemployed—will never be able to afford the rent in expensive West Coast cities. The first step in solving these intractable issues is to address the real problem: addiction is the common denominator for most of the homeless and must be confronted honestly if we have any hope of solving it.

    https://www.city-journal.org/opiods-...mmvCb5GOzkP9mg


    Last edited by Airbornesapper07; 06-16-2019 at 02:11 PM.
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