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Thread: CA. Assembly sends Jerry Brown bill to protect illegal aliens

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  1. #11
    Senior Member MontereySherry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HAPPY2BME View Post
    Cesar Chavez's seasonal Mexican immigrant workers have now become the majority government in California.
    Cesar Chavez did not support illegal immigration. In my senior year of high school I worked along side him picking strawberries in the Salinas Valley. Rather then bring in illegals he asked students at the various high schools to help him. He was for the rights of Mexican/American migrant workers not for illegal immigrant farm workers. I bet he is turning in his grave at how the Pro-illegal activists have bastarized his memory.
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  2. #12
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Cesar Chavez: Longtime foe of illegal immigration
    www.renewamerica.com/columns/fischer/070322
    You +1'd this publicly. Undo
    Mar 22, 2007 – Cesar Chavez: Longtime foe of illegal immigration ... of 1924, so Chavez openly and actively opposed illegal immigration because it crippled ...
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


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  3. #13
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    San Diego County Sheriff William Gore, who may join Baca in defying the Trust Act if the governor signs it . . .

    "To do these types of things unwinds partnerships that have worked so well to protect the public," said Riverside County Sheriff Stan Sniff, who said he "wouldn't be surprised" if his department ends up defying the Trust Act . . .

    http://www.alipac.us/f12/l-sheriff-b...cement-263082/
    Last edited by JohnDoe2; 08-26-2012 at 12:44 AM.
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    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


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  4. #14
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    California’s TRUST Act Helps Local Law Enforcement Prioritize

    By Ali Noorani
    Published August 25, 2012
    Fox News Latino




    Imagine you head to lunch with a “friend” who has forgotten his wallet and he asks you to pick up the tab.

    Next, imagine that your friend does the same thing every day and never pays you back. But he always invites you to lunch.

    That’s the kind of “friend” local law enforcement officials have in the federal government when it comes to immigration enforcement right now.

    Via the inaccurately named Secure Communities program, federal immigration officials have asked local jails to lengthen stays for people suspected of violating the immigration code — and localities must pick up the tab.

    As a result, valuable local police resources are distracted from combating crime and innocent immigrants who are not a public safety threat are caught in the web of poorly designed enforcement programs.

    Our law enforcement officials can ill-afford friends like these — and now, California is on the verge of doing something about it. The state Senate has passed the TRUST Act, with the assembly likely to follow suit before the end of the month.

    The TRUST Act would help keep Secure Communities within its bounds — and set an example for the rest of the country. It would focus the cooperation of local law enforcement with federal immigration efforts such that people could be detained for extra time in local jails, pending transfer to immigration authorities for deportation, only if they have been charged with or convicted of a serious or violent felony.

    The bill recognizes that hardworking new Americans’ confidence in law enforcement is essential to our public safety. That’s just common sense.

    The mile-wide-inch-deep nature of Secure Communities has ensnared American citizens such as Antonio Montejano, born in Los Angeles and still a resident of the city. In November 2011, he was wrongly held for four days after being charged with misdemeanor petty theft, under $50.

    He was freed only after the American Civil Liberties Union sent his passport and birth certificate to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

    Haphazard and harsh enforcement measures are bound to entangle the wrong people, not only U.S. citizens but also aspiring citizens who pose no public-safety threat.

    Trust and an open line of communication between police and crime victims and witnesses are essential to the safety of our communities.

    Putting immigrant survivors of domestic violence into deportation proceedings — another example of Secure Communities gone wrong — sabotages the trust and silences the communication.

    Also in California, an undocumented domestic violence survivor called police only to be taken to jail with her alleged abuser because police were suspicious of a mark on his cheek. Then she was turned over to immigration authorities. Thanks to the expensive, ineffective Secure Communities program, a call for help from a survivor of abuse put her at risk for deportation.

    California isn’t alone in seeking a new approach. A slew of localities already have taken similar steps to focus local-federal cooperation, including Santa Clara County, San Francisco, Cook County, Ill., the District of Columbia and Taos County and San Miguel County in New Mexico.

    Passage of the TRUST Act and similar measures will not just strengthen community policing, but also provide powerful encouragement for the federal government to put its own immigration house in order.

    Instead of aggressively outsourcing immigration responsibilities to local police, our political leaders — in Congress and the administration — must pick up the reins and steer us toward immigration policy that supports the rights and freedoms of all of us.

    In the meantime, once the TRUST Act emerges from the California legislature, Gov. Jerry Brown should sign it into law. In doing so, he will make Californians safer and their communities stronger. And local law enforcement officials won’t feel like they’re always paying for lunch.

    California
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


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  5. #15
    Senior Member HAPPY2BME's Avatar
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    ADDED TO ALIPAC HOMEPAGE News with amended title .

    http://www.alipac.us/content.php?r=8...illegal-aliens
    Join our FIGHT AGAINST illegal immigration & to secure US borders by joining our E-mail Alerts at http://eepurl.com/cktGTn

  6. #16
    Senior Member Ratbstard's Avatar
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    Bill would give young immigrants licenses

    Bill would give young immigrants licenses

    sfgate.com
    Nanette Asimov
    Updated 10:26 p.m., Saturday, August 25, 2012

    Six months after a state deadline for introducing new bills, Democratic lawmakers have found a way to shoehorn a bill into the Legislature to make certain undocumented immigrants under age 31 eligible for a driver's license if they arrived in this country before they were 16.

    The law would, for the first time, let about 400,000 undocumented residents apply for licenses. These are the same California immigrants who became eligible in June to work and avoid deportation under a national program of the Obama administration called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

    The program affects young undocumented immigrants who are in school, have completed school or have served honorably in the military.

    Unlike the governors of Texas, Arizona and Nebraska who have pledged to block efforts to allow such licenses, Gov. Jerry Brown appears open to the idea.

    And because of a loophole in state law, Assemblyman Gil Cedillo, D-Los Angeles, was able to create a driver's license bill Friday.

    He amended an existing bill, AB2189, loading it up with language to allow license eligibility.

    'Gut and amend'

    The original bill was to let people use a photograph rather than a signature for identification when renting a car. Its new purpose has the support of the original author, Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner, D-Berkeley, and other Democratic lawmakers.

    "It's not an abuse of the process," Cedillo said. "The rules permit making amendments to a bill that's germane - and this is probably the most appropriate amendment for it."

    Known as "gut and amend," the process of changing a bill at the last minute has been criticized as a way of slipping in new laws without full public discussion.

    But Cedillo said the question of driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants has been debated for years.

    California first required proof of legal residency for licenses in 1993. Since then, Cedillo has tried many times to change the law. Democratic Gov. Gray Davis vetoed the effort twice, as did Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger.

    The subject "has been fully vetted and debated now into the second decade," Cedillo said.

    He called the bill a safety issue.

    "For 60 years, we had the safest highways in America because our strategy was to license all motorists," he said. "Once we started playing immigrant politics with our highways, they became less safe."

    GOP leader objects

    Assembly Republican leader Connie Conway of Tulare disagreed.

    "While well intentioned, this is simply an attempt to mask the president's failure to fulfill his campaign promise to enact comprehensive immigration reform," said Conway, who called the effort "unfair to the thousands of immigrants who are patiently following the legal path to citizenship."

    Conway also said the Democrats "should not shove through controversial policies at the end of the legislative year, without public input."

    It's unlikely Republicans could block the bill because Democrats hold the majority.

    All bills, meanwhile, have to pass through the Legislature by Friday. If approved, AB2189 would move to the governor's desk. Brown has said he wouldn't support licenses for all undocumented immigrants but has suggested that he would favor licenses for those who fall under Obama's new policy.

    Nanette Asimov is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. E-mail: nasimov@sfchronicle.com

    Read more: Bill would give young immigrants licenses - SFGate
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  7. #17
    Administrator ALIPAC's Avatar
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    It is a sad sad day when anyone finds themselves in the the deplorable position of having to beg Jerry Brown to do the right thing.

    W
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  8. #18
    Junior Member thomasinpain's Avatar
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    Let's look at this from a different perspective. This is the first state to nullify federal law in favor of assisting the invaders. Nullification is the most powerful act an individual or group of states can make. It shows thier defiance of written federal law. (Remember a group of states called the Confederate states that did the same thing and how the federal government reacted?)

    Our movement could'nt ask for any thing better than for a state like California to nullify federal immigration law in favor of the invaders. It will force the federal government to react against California and if it does not, it opens the door for other states to nullify federal imigration law in the opposite direction. The feds cannot allow any state to nullify any law. If they did do so, the feds will lose all power and we all know how much they covet thier power.

    Ask Abraham Lincoln how he would react to states nullifying a federal law. Oh that's right, he would take the country to war against it's own citizens in a little something called the Civil War.

    Nullification is power.
    Let's exercise it and regain the power always meant for the states to have per the 10th amendment.
    working4change and bobspunkin like this.

  9. #19
    Senior Member MontereySherry's Avatar
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    Seems my state government is so busy representing illegal immigrants that they have no time for legal tax paying citizens. It is nothing less then taxation without representation for legal citizens.

  10. #20
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Flurry of immigration bills will test Gov. Jerry Brown

    By Matt O'Brien
    Contra Costa Times
    mercurynews.comPosted: 08/27/2012 01:39:30 PM PDT

    August 27, 2012 8:43 PM GMTUpdated: 08/27/2012 01:43:30 PM PDT

    California lawmakers are pushing this week to pass four bills that would make life easier for immigrants living and working here illegally, but all require the support of a governor who chooses his immigration causes carefully.

    Gov. Jerry Brown won praise last fall from Latinos and immigrant communities when he signed a law giving illegal immigrant college students access to state financial aid, but this season he must sift through a more complicated set of measures that opponents view as defying federal prerogatives.

    The flurry comes in the last days of the 2012 legislative session and tests the compassion and political future of Brown, who supports a path to citizenship for California's more than 2 million illegal immigrants but has repeatedly said the solution must come from the federal government.

    Already on Brown's desk is the Trust Act, which would partially pull California out of an immigration dragnet that has deported about 80,000 people from the state since Brown, as attorney general, signed a federal-state partnership in 2009.

    "It's a lottery" whether Brown will sign or veto the Trust Act, said the bill's author, Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco. The bill went to the governor's desk Friday after a 48-26 vote in the Assembly and earlier approval in the state Senate.

    Ammiano's bill would restrict jails from holding immigrants for deportation unless they committed a serious or violent felony. It is meant to counter the Secure Communities fingerprints program that alerts U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) whenever local police jail a deportable immigrant.

    Immigrant advocates say the federal program deports too many non-criminals and low-level offenders, while most sheriffs support the ICE partnership and want Brown to veto the Trust Act.

    Brown and his aides declined to comment on any pending legislation, but he has supported Secure Communities since he was attorney general.

    "Every person arrested, their fingerprints are taken and they're sent to my office, and I now send them to the immigration office," Brown boasted in a 2010 election debate with his Republican challenger Meg Whitman. "If they're found to be here illegally, they're made subject to deportation."

    Ammiano is hoping for a change of heart by Brown and others who the lawmaker says were misled into believing the program was focused on deporting criminals. Brown "signed a boilerplate memorandum of understanding ... based on a number of lies, not by him, but by ICE," Ammiano said.

    Also coming soon to Brown's desk may be a measure by Assemblyman Gil Cedillo, D-Los Angeles, who has until the end of the week to usher through the Legislature a bill that would grant driver's licenses to young illegal immigrants who get work permits from the Obama administration.

    Two other bills were introduced Friday, just one week before the Legislature adjourns for the year on Aug. 31. One surprise proposal known as the "Safe Harbor Act" seeks to protect all of the state's undocumented residents by allowing them to work and live in the state if they've been here since 2008. Its proponent, Felipe Fuentes, D-Sylmar, introduced the last-minute bill by "gutting and amending" another one focused on vehicle pollution.

    The fourth bill, the only one with Republican support, is a mostly symbolic measure to consider work permits for undocumented farm workers. Unlike his original version, however, the watered-down bill by Assemblyman Manuel Perez, D-Coachella, would not actually grant state work permits, but rather would set up a working group to discuss the idea.

    Flurry of immigration bills will test Gov. Jerry Brown - San Jose Mercury News
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


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