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Thread: Blue Wave: Los Angeles Typhus Cases Hit 100 as Rat-Infested Slums Spread Disease

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    Blue Wave: Los Angeles Typhus Cases Hit 100 as Rat-Infested Slums Spread Disease

    Blue Wave: Los Angeles Typhus Cases Hit 100 as Rat-Infested Slums Spread Disease

    Feral cats and rats driving flea-born Typhus epidemic in liberal LA

    By: Jay Greenberg
    on 1st November 2018 @ 3.00pm



    © press Recorded cases of Typhus have now passed 100 in Los Angeles as diseases spreads through slums

    If we want to see the blue wave in full effect, we only need to take a look at liberal Los Angeles, where millionaire celebrities lecture the rest of the population from their mansions, surrounded by rat-infested slums.
    Along with San Francisco, LA has ensured that California is now home to some of the world's filthiest slums, with some areas even rivaling third-world countries such as India and Kenya.
    Feral cats and rats plague the trash-lined streets causing diseases to spread.
    Health officials have now warned that the number of flea-born Typhus cases in Los Angeles has just hit 107.

    Los Angeles County Department of Public Health has reported that, so far this year, 72 patients have been recorded in central LA, with a further 15 in Long Beach and another 20 in Pasadena.
    In the 2000s only 20 cases of the disease were recorded per year and analysts are attributing the dramatic rise to the massive 47 percent increase in homelessness since 2012.

    One official in Long Beach told NBC News that almost half a million potential cases are currently "under investigation."



    © press Children fend for scraps in the trash that litters Los Angeles' slums

    According to the Daily Mail, at the start of this month, Pasadena, a city in the north of the county and home to around 135,000 people, reported epidemic levels of typhus fever.

    But no new cases have been reported there since October 5.

    Flea-borne typhus occurs when feces from an infected insect come into contact with a person's cut or gets rubbed into their eyes.
    These fleas often live on feral cats and rats who are attracted to areas with trash on the streets.
    Most sufferers endure headaches, fever, and rash, however, in severe cases, typhus can lead to life-threatening hepatitis and internal bleeding.
    Dr. Ying-Ying Goh, Pasadena's health officer, said: "Typhus fever is a disease that can cause serious complications requiring lengthy hospitalization, and rarely, death."

    She encouraged all residents in the city to take precautions in order to prevent fleas in and around their homes, CNN reports.
    Dr. Anne Rimoin, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of California, told CNN: "Right now, it's hard to speculate on why we are seeing more cases.
    "There is an ongoing investigation by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health that seeks to answer this question."
    Earlier this month it was reported that a dozen cases of the disease appeared in a residential neighborhood of LA.

    All of the sufferers lived or worked in the immediate area, with some being homeless.

    The infection usually takes two weeks to cause symptoms.
    Typhus usually affects around 200 people across the US every year, according to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH).
    Health officials were alerted to the outbreak when a cluster of nine cases occurred in downtown LA between July and August.
    The infection is endemic in parts of LA and Orange County, Southern California.
    Fleas carrying the infection can live on cats, rats or opossums, however, the animals themselves do not suffer symptoms.

    Typhus often spreads in areas where there is an accumulation of trash that attracts wild animals.
    The infection cannot be transmitted from person-to-person and is treatable with antibiotics.
    There is no vaccine in the US.

    Up to four percent of people worldwide who are untreated die, the CDPH claims.
    To prevent infection, LA's public health department recommends residents use flea control on pets, tuck their pants into their socks or boots when outside and avoid wild or stray animals.
    Texas experienced a flea-borne typhus outbreak around this time last year.

    More than 400 cases occurred from the start of 2017 to the end of November - the highest number for 16 years.


    © press Pasedena and Long Beach have separate health boards to Central LA which is why cases are counted separately


    © press The Democratic vision for America: Citizens experiencing the blue wave in liberal Los Angeles

    WHAT IS FLEA-BORNE TYPHUS?

    Flea-borne typhus is a bacterial disease that causes fever, headache, rash, muscle ache, and fever and chills.
    In severe cases, patients can require hospitalization due to hepatitis or internal bleeding.
    It is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia typhi and possibly Rickettsia felis, which are carried by fleas.
    The fleas live on animals, particularly feral and stray cats, rats and opossums, but do not make their host animals unwell.
    Flea-borne typhus is endemic in parts of LA and Orange County.
    The disease also often occurs in Texas and Hawaii.
    Around 200 cases occur every year throughout the US, particularly in coastal regions.
    Bacteria spread when feces from an infected flea contaminate a person's cut or graze while the flea is sucking their blood.
    If the person scratches the flea-bite area, the bacteria from the feces can enter their bloodstream.
    Bacteria can also be rubbed into a person's eyes, or, in rare cases, inhaled.
    Symptoms then appear six-to-14 days later.
    Flea-borne typhus can be treated via antibiotics, with most people recovering within a few days.
    Between two and four percent of people who do not receive treatment die worldwide.
    Flea-borne typhus can be prevented by avoiding contact with fleas via:

    • Discouraging wild animals around the home
    • Keeping rubbish covered
    • Using flea control on pets



    https://neonnettle.com/news/5508-blu...spread-disease
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Beezer's Avatar
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    The "blue wave" is all about putting everybody living under a BLUE TARP!

    And these people keep voting for the Democrats destroying our cities and our Nation.

    Preference for illegal aliens and foreigners over Americans is their plan to reach that goal.

    What better way to accelerate the process of poverty, homelessness and crime than to import it from all over the world and dump in in our neighborhoods, it affects us all.

    Mission accomplished for the Democrats evil plan.



    THIS IS YOUR "BLUE WAVE"






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    TO BECOME AN AMERICAN YOU MUST CHANGE YOUR VALUES ...NOT YOUR LOCATION

    STAY HOME AND BUILD AMERICA ON YOUR SOIL

  3. #3
    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    All the vaccines in the world can’t stop the Los Angeles TYPHUS epidemic that’s exploding due to third-world socialist conditions

    (Natural News) In the past few weeks, there has been a lot of media hype about the measles “outbreak” which has left 48 people ill in Washington State. Although measles can cause serious complications in rare cases, for the vast majority of people it is a relatively harmless viral infection that results in fever, coughing, sore eyes, a … [Read More...]

    Monday, February 04, 2019 by: Tracey Watson
    Tags: badhealth, badmedicine, California, Collapse, Collapsifornia, disease, fleas, homelessness, infectious disease, infectious diseases, left cult, liberals, Los Angeles, outbreak, political bias, priority, Rats, rickettsial bacteria, selective news coverage, Skid Row, suppressed news, The Typhus Zone, typhus fever

    3,380 Views
    (Natural News) In the past few weeks, there has been a lot of media hype about the measles “outbreak” which has left 48 people ill in Washington State. Although measles can cause serious complications in rare cases, for the vast majority of people it is a relatively harmless viral infection that results in fever, coughing, sore eyes, a runny nose and a rash. There is another illness that has reached epidemic proportions on the U.S. west coast, however, which surprisingly has barely created a whisper among mainstream media outlets: an outbreak of typhus fever in Los Angeles, California.

    While measles is a viral infection which a strong immune system can fend off, typhus is a bacterial infection which, left untreated, can cause serious complications and results in death in at least 40 percent of cases. There is no vaccine against typhus, which perhaps explains why the media is largely ignoring this story. Ironically, while vaccines have a sketchy track record at best at preventing diseases like measles, typhus can be eliminated easily through simple hygiene practices. And yet it continues to spread across the city of Los Angeles.
    The return of a medieval disease

    Typhus is virtually unheard of in most modern western societies because it is strongly associated with large volumes of people living in unsanitary conditions overrun with flea-ridden rats (think New York City, circa 1840 to 1875).
    But those are exactly the unhealthy conditions in which thousands of homeless people live in L.A., creating a breeding ground for a disease which causes symptoms that include high fever and chills, headaches, rapid breathing, body pain, coughing, nausea, a rash, vomiting and confusion.
    What is typhus fever? HealthLine explains:
    Typhus is a disease caused by infection with one or more rickettsial bacteria. Fleas, mites (chiggers), lice, or ticks transmit it when they bite you. Fleas, mites, lice, and ticks are types of invertebrate animals known as arthropods. When arthropods carrying around rickettsial bacteria bite someone, they transmit the bacteria that causes typhus. Scratching the bite further opens the skin and allows the bacteria greater access to the bloodstream. Once in the bloodstream, the bacteria continue to reproduce and grow.
    Early treatment is essential if a typhus victim is to beat the disease, but diagnosis is difficult and can be delayed because symptoms are so similar to those of other infectious diseases, including dengue fever, malaria and brucellosis. (Related: 10 diseases that will become far more common after the collapse.)
    Although most of the typhus cases in L.A. have been diagnosed among homeless people who live in the area known as Skid Row, the disease has started spreading to other parts of the city. As reported by The Gateway Pundit, Liz Greenwood, a deputy city attorney based at City Hall, was also recently diagnosed. Greenwood told NBC 4 that it felt like railroad stakes were being driven through her eyes and out the back of her neck. She believes that she contracted the disease from the “enormous rats” that have infested City Hall East.
    What is the city doing about the problem?

    City Mayor Eric Garcetti has allocated millions of dollars to cleaning up L.A, in particular Skid Row, which has come to be known as “The Typhus Zone.” A statement by the mayor’s office noted:
    Last fall we directed multiple City departments to begin a coordinated and comprehensive effort to improve cleanliness and protect public health in the Civic Center, including City Hall and City Hall East. In addition to increased trash collection and cleanings, aggressive action has been taken to address pests both in the buildings and in the surrounding outside areas — including abatement treatments and the filling of 60 rodent burrows and 114 tree wells. This work in busy and highly populated public buildings is executed carefully to protect workers and visitors, and the scheduling of extermination activities takes these factors into consideration.
    Despite these efforts, 2018 was a record-breaking year, with 124 cases of typhus fever documented by the California Department of Public Health. Learn more at Outbreak.news.

    Sources include:

    TheGatewayPundit.com
    NBCLosAngeles.com
    NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov
    HealthLine.com


    https://www.naturalnews.com/2019-02-...onditions.html
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