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  1. #1
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Chicago only major U.S. city to lose population from 2015 to 2016

    Chicago only major U.S. city to lose population from 2015 to 2016

    Census stats comparing Chicago population among 14 other major cities

    Marwa Eltagouri Contact Reporter

    Chicago was the only city among the nation's 20 largest to lose population in 2016 — and it lost nearly double the number of residents as the year before, according to newly released data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

    It's the city's third consecutive year of population loss.

    Chicago's population fell by 8,638 residents between 2015 and 2016, to 2,704,958. The year before, it declined by 4,934.


    The population of the greater Chicago area, defined by the Census Bureau as the city and suburbs extending into Wisconsin and Indiana, is also declining. Numbers made available in March showed a drop of 19,570 residents in 2016 — the greatest loss of any metropolitan area in the country.


    Illinois' population fell by more than any other state in 2016, down 37,508 people, according to census data released in December.


    Chicago's population drop is part of a larger pattern of slowed urban growth in 2016. The country's top cities did not see the same surge as in previous years, experts say.


    During the recession of 2008, families chose to stay in or move to core urban areas, and migration to the suburbs decelerated.

    Now, as families recover economically, they're deciding it's time to move back to the suburbs — a trend experts say may keep city populations where they are for the next few years.


    Illinoisans in recent years have flocked to Sun Belt states, such as Texas, Arizona and Florida, contributing to the local population loss. During the years after the recession, migration to those states slowed, but then it heated up again as states in the South and West had greater job opportunities and affordable housing.

    Chicago’s population fell by 8,638 residents between 2015 and 2016. It was the only city among the nation’s 20 largest that lost population during the year, according to newly released data from the U.S. Census Bureau.
    (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune)

    While the major cities in those states continue to grow, they aren't growing as rapidly as they have in recent years. Houston, which saw the second-largest increase among major cities in 2015, when it gained 40,817 residents, gained 18,666 residents in 2016.

    Demographers last year told the Tribune that Houston's growth in 2015 was a sign it could overtake Chicago in a decade as the nation's third-largest-city. But with the slowing growth of big cities overall, experts aren't sure it will happen so soon.

    Even New York didn't see as much growth in 2016 as it had in previous years. It grew by 21,171 people, compared with 44,512 people in 2015 and 49,530 in 2014.


    "The big city growth we saw at the beginning of the decade is not quite as evident in the last couple years," said William Frey, a demographer with the Brookings Institution who analyzes census data.


    By most estimates, Chicago's population will continue to decline. Over the past year, the Tribune surveyed dozens of former residents who said they have packed their bags for a variety of reasons: high taxes, the state budget stalemate, crime, the unemployment rate and weather.


    Black residents have been among those leaving in search of safe neighborhoods and prosperity, with many heading to the suburbs and warm-weather states. Chicago lost 181,000 black residents between 2000 and 2010, according to census data.


    Chicago's population plunge continues to be a result, mostly, of losing residents to other states. About 89,547 residents left Chicago and its surrounding suburbs for other states in 2016, a number that couldn't be offset by new residents and births, according to an analysis of census data released in March. The number of people leaving the Chicago region is the highest since at least 1990.


    More than any other city, Chicago has depended on Mexican immigrants to balance the slow growth of its native-born population. During the 1990s, immigration accounted for most of Chicago's growth. After 2007, when Mexican-born populations began to fall across the nation's major metropolitan areas, most cities managed to make up for the loss with the growth of their native populations. Chicago couldn't.


    The entire Midwest has been losing residents, census data show. Detroit lost 3,541 residents from 2015 to 2016, and Milwaukee lost 4,366. But job and business opportunities are still stronger in neighboring Midwestern states than in Illinois, sending more Chicagoans to other parts of the Midwest than vice versa, experts said.


    The greatest number of Illinois residents in recent years went to Texas, followed by Florida, Indiana, California and Arizona, according to 2013 Internal Revenue Service migration data.


    Chicagoans are likely to continue heading to those warmer states, as the South in 2016 was home to 10 of the 15 fastest-growing large cities. The population of Texas as a whole continues to rise, and the Census Bureau placed five Texas cities on its list of major cities with the largest population increases.


    Michael Bennett, 43, moved to Houston for a job in 2008, but was so committed to staying a Chicagoan that he kept his Lincoln Park home, and would fly back on spare weekends and holidays. He sold his property and settled in Houston for good in 2015, saying his "romance and love for Chicago couldn't outweigh" his concerns about the city.


    The cost of living was too high, he said. Property taxes kept rising. His home was robbed twice. "It's not just limited to poor neighborhoods. Trouble could strike anywhere," he said.


    He had moved to Chicago in 2005 after spending most of his life in Michigan. Living in Chicago was always his dream, and he still misses being on the lakefront and strolling down Michigan Avenue. But Houston offers a diverse, cultural lifestyle similar to that of Chicago, he said. He's received job offers to return to Chicago, but even a higher salary couldn't balance increasing property taxes, he said.


    Bennett said he thinks there will soon be a "tipping point" in Chicago, when more residents realize it's time to go.


    "It's just sad to see that people have to leave the city to protect their own future cost of living," he said.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...524-story.html

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    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Cook County Illinois Suffers Largest Population Drop In Entire US

    by Tyler Durden
    Mar 26, 2017 11:10 AM

    Authored by Mike Shedlock via MishTalk.com,

    Illinois voters are voting with their feet. Not only are people scrambling to get out of Cook County, but the entire state is suffering.

    Illinois Policy Institute writer Michael Lucci explains in this guest post on Cook County Migration.


    Cook County has Largest Population Loss of Any County in U.S.


    Cook County lost more population than any other county in the United States from July 2015 to July 2016, according to a new data release from the U.S. Census Bureau.

    Cook County shrank by 21,324 people. The county had more births than deaths and gained 18,434 people from international immigration. However, Cook County had a net loss of 66,244 people to other parts of the United States, which more than offset the components of population growth.


    However, the people leaving Cook County aren’t showing up in other parts of Illinois when the net movements of people are considered.

    In fact, most of Illinois is depopulating – 93 of Illinois’ 102 counties are experiencing net out-migration, and 89 of Illinois’ 102 counties have shrinking populations.

    Illinois’ dysfunctional government, weak job creation, and ever-increasing tax burden help explain why. A Paul Simon Public Policy Institute poll released in October 2016 found that taxes were the No. 1 reason people want to leave Illinois.


    Cook, DuPage, Lake, Kane, McHenry, Will counties see net out-migration to other parts of the U.S.


    The major driver of Cook County’s shrinking population is that the county’s domestic migration losses have doubled over the last five years, while international gains have remained flat and gains from more births than deaths have declined.

    The flow of people out of Cook County did not result in net in-migration for the collar counties. Cook County’s net out-migration of 66,244 people was followed by net out-migration of 9,171 people from DuPage; 5,179 from Lake; 1,824 from Kane; 1,589 from McHenry; and 1,253 from Will. Kendall County is the nearest to Cook to have net inflows, with Kendall gaining 553 more people than it lost to other parts of the country.



    The out-migration from Cook, DuPage, Lake and McHenry counties was large enough to make all those counties shrink in total population. Kane County and Will County managed to have population gains despite their out-migration problems.


    It should worry policymakers in Chicago and Cook County that out-migration and population loss were already so strong in the July 2015 – July 2016 timeframe. That’s because Chicago and Cook County’s major property and sales tax hikes had not yet taken effect at the time of this out-migration. When those tax hikes are in place, the Chicago area will likely lose more population due to taxation. And the economic effects of increased taxation will be felt a few years later, with fewer jobs and economic growth than would have occurred without the tax hikes. Population loss in the Chicago area is likely to get worse.


    Not just the collar counties: All of Illinois is seeing population losses


    The problem is not just with Cook and the collar counties: The majority of Illinois counties are shrinking. Eighty-nine of Illinois’ 102 counties are shrinking in total population. Northeast Illinois is shrinking most in terms of total population, but many downstate counties are shrinking and seeing more out-migration as a percentage of population. For example, Rock Island and Peoria counties both have more out-migration as a percentage of population than Cook County.


    Most of Illinois’ metropolitan statistical areas are also shrinking due to large migration losses to other parts of the country, with only Elgin and Champaign showing slow population growth. The Chicago metro division saw a net migration loss of nearly 78,000 people, driving a population decline of more than 19,000 people for the Chicago metro division.


    Elgin had net migration losses to other parts of the country. However, Elgin’s population growth is attributable to an unusually high birth rate and a solid gain of international immigrants. Champaign similarly relies on international immigration to avoid a shrinking population size. Champaign showed a large gain from international immigration, likely a flow of international students to the University of Illinois.



    The U.S. Census Bureau’s report does not come as a surprise, but it should serve as a warning to state and local governments. Illinois is depopulating, and no area is immune from its effects. Downstate communities are especially stressed due to the loss of manufacturing jobs and other blue-collar industries.

    And the Chicago area is likely to face additional stress as nearly $2 billion dollars in tax hikes are phased in over the next few years.


    Lawmakers can take on two key measures to give taxpayers hope. The first is to freeze property taxes statewide so Illinoisans can feel secure in their homes.

    The second is to pass a balanced budget without any tax increases to give residents confidence that lawmakers can rein in out-of-control spending and not repeatedly hit up taxpayers for more of their hard-earned dollars.


    Before considering any more tax increases, policymakers statewide should consider the sobering reality of how quickly people are leaving the state.


    Michael Lucci


    Mish Getaway


    People keep asking “When are you leaving?” Rest assured plans are in progress and have been for some time.

    But some people are stuck here. Others want to be here for personal reasons even though they are fed up with the state of affairs.


    IPI Push



    1. Give Illinoisans much-needed property tax relief
    2. Consolidate Illinois’ many layers of duplicative government
    3. Cut burdensome regulations to attract businesses and jobs to Illinois


    The Illinois Policy Institute is fighting on your behalf every day in Springfield. Please consider Making a Contribution to Illinois Policy Institute.


    I am an unpaid senior fellow at the IPI and receive no part of donations. My benefit is the same as yours. The IPI is fighting on our behalf.


    The Illinois Policy Institute is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization, and contributions are tax-deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law.


    Few organizations work as hard as the IPI to support Illinois taxpayers.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-0...drop-entire-us

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  3. #3
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Detroit's population still down, despite hopes

    Kristi Tanner , Detroit Free Press Staff Writer Published 12:01 a.m. ET May 25, 2017 | Updated 4 hours ago



    New figures say Detroit's population continues to decline amid efforts to revitalize the city.Detroit Free Press


    Clinton Township' s population exceeds 100,000 residents


    (Photo: Mary Schroeder, Special to the Free Press)


    Despite hopes of a turnaround in a decades-long decline, Detroit lost population in the latest U.S. Census estimates, down 0.5% or 3,541 people. The annual decline is the same as a year earlier, when the exodus of residents slowed to its lowest rate in decades.

    Mayor Mike Duggan has placed special emphasis on Detroit's rebirth being measured by population growth, among other things. Chief of Staff Alexis Wiley said Wednesday that despite the census estimates the administration sees other positive signs.


    "We are pleased in the direction that we are heading. ... The data are a year behind," Wiley said, citing building permits, home prices and 3,000 more occupied residences reported by DTE Energy in the city in March versus the same time a year earlier.


    Also on Freep.com:

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    The numbers, based on data from July 1, 2016, show Detroit slid down the largest cities list, dropping from No. 21 to 23.

    Last year, for the first time since before the Civil War, Detroit fell out of the top 20.


    The city's population peaked in 1950 at 1,849,568. The latest data have the population at 672,795 residents.


    "Only one city out of the top 25 has lost population since 2010 and that is Detroit," said demographer Kurt Metzger, founder of Data Driven Detroit and mayor of Pleasant Ridge.


    Of the latest Detroit estimates, Metzger said it is important to remember the numbers relate to last July "and do not account for the large number of (residential) units that have come online since then, as well as those in the pipeline in downtown, riverfront and Midtown/New Center" areas.


    Clinton Township in Macomb County surpassed the 100,000 mark for the first time this year, according to the data. The community had 100,392 residents in 2016 — a gain of 541 or 0.5% from July 1, 2015, to July 1, 2016.


    Bob Cannon, township supervisor, took the news as an opportunity to boast about the township’s continued growth.


    “It is a great community to have a home,” Cannon said, touting local hospitals, educational institutions, retail, parks and recreation, and a civic center that includes eight new courts for pickle ball — a sport the USA Pickleball Association describes as a combination of badminton, tennis and ping-pong.


    The city of Flint continued to lose residents at a rate of 0.8%, about 754 fewer people, to an estimated 97,386 in 2016. That rate matched the decline of the two previous years.


    The whole state saw a marginal increase in total population — 0.1% or 10,585 people, during the same time period.

    In Oakland County, the top three communities for population growth were Lyon Township, which grew 5.2% — the third highest rate in the state; Sylvan Lake, up 2.3%, and Oakland Township, up 1.7%.

    In Macomb County, Washington Township grew the fastest at 1.8%. Macomb and Shelby townships followed with growth at 1.1%.


    Only four communities saw growth in Wayne County: the city of Plymouth, which was up 2%, and Brownstown, Canton and Huron townships, which grew at rates of 0.8%, 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively.


    Search the database below to find population estimates for your community:


    Nationwide, the Census Bureau found that cities in the South grew at a faster rate than any other region in the country.

    "Since the 2010 Census, the population in large southern cities grew by an average of 9.4%. In comparison, cities in the West grew 7.3%, while cities in the Northeast and Midwest had much lower growth rates at 1.8% and 3% respectively," said Amel Toukabri, a demographer in the Census Bureau's population division.

    http://www.freep.com/story/news/2017...ues/341336001/

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    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Census data: Population loss in lower-income cities offsets growth in southern Lake County

    New U.S. Census Bureau numbers show Waukegan lost 168 people from 2015 to 2016 and has shed nearly 1,000 residents since 2010. (Dan Moran/News-Sun)

    Luke Hammill News-Sun

    When the U.S. Census Bureau released county-level population statistics earlier this year, the data showed that the number of people living in Lake County remained relatively flat between 2015 and 2016.

    More granular data made public Thursday provides a closer look, showing the cities and villages within the county that are attracting and losing residents. The numbers give additional insight into the recent trend of population loss in Illinois and the Chicago area, which shed more people than any other metropolitan area in the country from 2015 to 2016.


    There were 703,047 people living in Lake County as of July 1, 2016, down from 703,413 a year earlier, according to the estimates released earlier this year. The loss of 366 residents reflected a decrease of less than one-tenth of 1 percent.


    The city-level data published Thursday showed that the areas within Lake County that suffered population loss were generally the lower-income communities along the northeastern Lake Michigan waterfront and cities and villages in the Chain O'Lakes area. Meanwhile, the more affluent communities in the southern part of the county tended to experience population growth.


    Elizabeth Schuh, principal policy analyst at the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning, said that although it didn't lose as many people as populous Cook County last year, Lake County is still experiencing trends that mirror the stagnant or even negative growth in the region.


    "Since 2010, about half of the municipalities in Lake County have lost population in at least four of the last six years, which is pretty substantive," Schuh said.


    Waukegan, the county seat and most populous city in Lake County, lost 168 people between 2015 and 2016 and has shed nearly 1,000 residents since 2010, the data shows. Similarly, North Chicago lost 69 people last year and more than 2,600 since 2010. Round Lake Beach, Zion, Gurnee and Antioch are also decreasing in population.


    "It might just still be very slow growth, or not any growth, but it is following a regional trend that we think is a concern for our economic success and our quality of life," Schuh said.


    On the other end of the spectrum, Volo, Hawthorn Woods and Vernon Hills were among the Lake County communities that gained the most population last year, with Volo increasing by 222 residents, Hawthorn Woods by 219 and Vernon Hills by 56. All three of those communities have sustained that growth since 2010 — Volo has grown by 1,361 residents, Vernon Hills by 1,270 and Hawthorn Woods by 405.

    "Volo actually had some pretty big subdivisions that it had platted before the recession, and I think some of them now have kicked back in," said Tom Chefalo, principal planner at the Lake County Planning, Building and Development Department. "So a lot of those lots that had been sitting empty are being filled by homes now."


    Other Lake County communities that have increased in population since 2010 are Deerfield (731 new residents), Mundelein (426) and Lake Zurich (265) — all of which are in the southern half of the county.


    "It's actually not surprising," Chefalo said of the data released Thursday. "Because the real estate market's recovered more quickly in the south, and there's actually been more building going on in the southern portion of the county."



    The numbers serve as another measure of the different levels of opportunity and quality of life across the county. Not only are lower-income communities tending to lose population, they are also suffering worse health outcomes, with North Chicago residents, for example, dying at an average age of 64, compared with 78 or 79 in affluent Lake Forest, five miles down Sheridan Road. Lake Forest's population has been almost flat, gaining just six residents last year and losing only nine since 2010.

    Kevin Considine, chief executive and president at the economic development nonprofit Lake County Partners, said the areas that are gaining in population are "the communities that seem like they're offering the amenities that the young professionals are looking for."


    As for cities like Waukegan and North Chicago, "that's where we're focusing a lot of our workforce development efforts, training folks for a lot of the middle-skill manufacturing jobs," Considine added.


    It's not just about "providing talent for the companies," Considine said, "but also providing the opportunities for the people."


    Nationally, the census data shows that 10 of the 15 fastest-growing large cities last year were in the southern United States, with four of the top five in Texas.


    "Overall, cities in the South continue to grow at a faster rate than any other U.S. region," Amel Toukabri, a demographer in the Census Bureau's population division, said in a news release. "Since the 2010 census, the population in large Southern cities grew by an average of 9.4 percent. In comparison, cities in the West grew 7.3 percent, while cities in the Northeast and Midwest had much lower growth rates at 1.8 percent and 3.0 percent respectively."


    Chicago remained the third-largest city in the nation, behind New York and Los Angeles. Houston and Phoenix rounded out the top five.


    http://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/lake-county-news-sun/news/ct-lns-census-releases-population-data-st-0525-20170524-story.html
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  5. #5
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    NO AMNESTY

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  6. #6
    Senior Member Judy's Avatar
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    We want population decline. We have too many people. We're going to deport illegal aliens which is going to reduce unwanted population. We're overpopulated now, that's why we have just high poverty, unemployment, welfare programs, stagnant wages, and working poor. Reduce legal immigration as well. We want high standards of living not more population. We want less population and wealthier citizens.
    A Nation Without Borders Is Not A Nation - Ronald Reagan
    Save America, Deport Congress! - Judy

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  7. #7
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judy View Post
    We want population decline. We have too many people. We're going to deport illegal aliens which is going to reduce unwanted population. We're overpopulated now, that's why we have just high poverty, unemployment, welfare programs, stagnant wages, and working poor. Reduce legal immigration as well. We want high standards of living not more population. We want less population and wealthier citizens.
    The more the population is cut the more stores will close and the more jobs will be lost.

    Apocalypse for retail: 3,500 stores closing in 2017


    60,000 Retail Jobs Lost in Two Months

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  8. #8
    Senior Member 6 Million Dollar Man's Avatar
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    Yeah, and I'm gonna be one of those statistics soon. Chicago used to be a world class city. Now half of the city looks like one big disaster area. Anyone have any ideas on a good place to move to? And don't say Indiana, because I moved right across the Illinois/Indiana border a while back just to get out of Cook County. I want to leave the Chicago area all together.
    Beezer likes this.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Beezer's Avatar
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    What kind of work do you do?
    TO BECOME AN AMERICAN YOU MUST CHANGE YOUR VALUES ...NOT YOUR LOCATION

    STAY HOME AND BUILD AMERICA ON YOUR SOIL

  10. #10
    Senior Member 6 Million Dollar Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beezer View Post
    What kind of work do you do?
    I'm a welder. Especially tig welding on stainless stell for the food industry. I also have an associates degree in IT. I actually worked in IT for a couple years, but I have been a welder all my life besides those couple of years in IT. Here in Chicago it's too hard to get anywhere in IT. Chicago isn't known for IT jobs. You don't have that many IT jobs, and on top of that, you have an enormous amount of people here with IT Degrees. Not enough IT jobs, but an enormous amount of competition for the ones that do exist here.

    It also doesn't help that I've been out of IT for a couple years. That's like a life time as far as the IT industry is concerned. I took night classes for IT while working as a welder during the day so I won't have to weld until I'm old and gray, but it looks like I might have to.

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