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    "Due To A Poor Harvest Season, We're Experiencing Shortages On Many Canned Vegetable

    "Due To A Poor Harvest Season, We're Experiencing Shortages On Many Canned Vegetable Items"


    Profile picture for user Tyler Durden
    by Tyler Durden
    Wed, 07/17/2019 - 10:05
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    Authored by Michael Snyder via The Economic Collapse blog,


    I know that this headline is alarming, but it is actually a direct quote from a notice that was recently posted in a Kroger supermarket.






    And as you will see below, similar notices are being posted in the canned vegetable sections of Wal-Mart stores nationwide. I would encourage you to examine the evidence in this article very carefully and to come to your own conclusions about what is happening. At this moment, social media is buzzing with reports of shortages of canned vegetables all around the country. But so far, the mainstream media is being eerily quiet about all of this. Is there a reason why they aren’t saying anything?


    For months, I have been reporting on the extremely bizarre weather patterns that are causing crop failures all over the planet. But I certainly did not expect that we would already begin to see product shortages on the shelves of major U.S. supermarkets this summer. What I am about to share with you is shocking, but the truth needs to get out. For those that share my articles on your own websites, I know that all of the images in this article are going to be an inconvenience, but it is imperative that you include them when you republish this article because they tell a story. All of the images are taken directly from Facebook, and they prove that we are now facing a nationwide shortage of canned vegetables.


    So let’s get started.


    This first image was posted on Facebook by Scott L. Biddle, and it shows a “product shortage” notice that was posted in the canned vegetable section of a Wal-Mart in Tennessee…






    All the way over on the west coast, similar notices were photographed by Gina Helm Taylor in the state of Oregon on July 12th…






    And here are a couple of notices that Daniel Moore was able to photograph during his lunch break at his local Wal-Mart…






    It appears that the exact same notices were sent to Wal-Mart stores all across America. Here is another one from Carol Guy Hodges…






    And lastly, here is a photo that was shared by Randy Sevy…






    This certainly isn’t the end of the world, and we can definitely survive without canned vegetables for a few weeks.


    But as crop failures around the globe continue to intensify, will shortages such as this start to become increasingly common?


    Earlier today, I received a very detailed email from a reader that had some excellent intel about what was going on at his own local Wal-Mart. The following is an excerpt from what he sent to me…


    This is alarming in and of itself, however, they are experiencing shortages across most product categories. The only information I could find online was pointing to a driver shortage. I noticed the shortage over the holiday weekend and returned this past weekend to take a closer look. There were problems with paper products, OTC medications, pickles (everyone wanted pickles?), lunch meats and hot dogs, vinegar, produce, alcohol, eggs, cereal, and feminine hygiene products. None of these items had signs like those posted in canned veggies, instead there were small tags placed over the original price tag the say “out of stock” in very small print.


    While a driver shortage could cause issues, it’s a little odd to me that there are 12 packs of toilet paper and 6 packs of coke but no 24 packs of either. One of the items being restocked were more of the 12 packs of toilet paper. Does a driver shortage account for this? Another oddity is that one Walmart may have pickles but no tortillas while the exact opposite will be true for a different Walmart. The employees that would normally be stocking were instead counting products (manually) and pulling product to the front of the shelves. There was a six foot stretch of Cheerios along one shelf that was one box deep, hiding the empty shelves behind them.


    One more item to note is that the first trip I made over the fourth of July weekend was to purchase canned corn. They had 9 cans of what I was looking for so I purchased them all. The following weekend they had restocked the same corn (there were 10 cans) but the price had increased almost 30%! The original purchase was for $1.44 while one week later the price had increased to $1.88.


    Sadly, the economic law of supply and demand is going to continue to push prices higher.


    And the tighter that food supplies become, the higher prices will go.


    Since the mainstream media is being completely silent about this, many people on social media don’t have much information to go on. Speculation is rampant, and many are fearing the worst.


    One Facebook user named Stephen Dubaniewicz believes that all of the product shortage notices at his local Wal-Mart could mean that a food shortage is on the way…






    Hopefully we have some more time before things start getting really bad, but I would encourage you to use this time to get prepared while you still can.


    For months, I have been documenting the problems that U.S. farmers have been experiencing due to all of the endless rain and flooding in the middle of the country.


    But sometimes a picture is worth a thousands words, and this before and after photo from Nebraska speaks volumes…






    We know that food production in the United States is going to be way below expectations this year.


    And as I just showed you, it appears that a shortage of canned vegetables has already begun.


    A full-blown crisis has not arrived yet, but perhaps one is a lot closer than many of us had anticipated.


    This is a huge story, and I will continue to keep you updated.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-...egetable-items

    Been slowly stocking up for a few weeks now. PLENTY OF LAND and WATER in Southern Florida to grow a SUMMER CROP of vegtables????? Wonder why they're waiting for winter to plant????? Or are they planting a summer crop????? The situation in IL. from what I can see from the closet Corn and Bean fields which are basically within the greater Chgo. area is this: LOTS OF BEANS WERE PLANTED AND THEY'RE DOING OK. NOT MUCH CORN and what was planted is really really underdeveloped for this time of year. The weather has finally gotten warm like 3 weeks ago and we had a much needed heavy rain yesterday and last night. There probably won't be a Bean shortage but there will be a Corn shortage. Thing is, CATTLE CAN EAT GRASS WITH NO PROBLEM. Pigs, I assume are a little different and need to be in feed lots. I'm going to drive about 60 miles out of the Communist Chicago area this weekend to take a really good look at what's going on with the fields and to also GET AWAY from this mentally ill society for a few hours. Will have a full report on the crop fields next week.
    Last edited by tonyklo; 07-17-2019 at 10:22 AM.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Beezer's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting Tony!

    Food shortages all over the world. But our traitor government wants open borders and dump 2 billion people on our backs with NO thought to our future!

    We need Global Population Control.

    I am glad Trump cut off funds for women's health in foreign countries! They are not our responsibility, and those women should not be having 8-10 kids they cannot feed! I am sick of the U.N. crying for the USA to feed the world. Get on birth control and feed your own damn self! Stop sending them here.

    They can build greenhouses, they need to stop overbreeding, they need to build up their own countries! Not come here and devour up our land, our water, and our resources!
    TO BECOME AN AMERICAN YOU MUST CHANGE YOUR VALUES ...NOT YOUR LOCATION

    STAY HOME AND BUILD AMERICA ON YOUR SOIL

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    Every store I've been in lately has all of the canned vegetables and fresh vegetables you could possibly want.
    NO AMNESTY

    Don't reward the criminal actions of millions of illegal aliens by giving them citizenship.


    Sign in and post comments here.

    Please support our fight against illegal immigration by joining ALIPAC's email alerts here https://eepurl.com/cktGTn

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    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    This Farmers Report looks better with all of the graphics that go with it @

    https://www.usfoods.com/content/dam/...mersReport.pdf
    ----------------------------------

    FARMER’SREPORT

    MARKET TRENDS | 7.12.2019

    PRODUCE
    All produce pricing trends are based on USDA data as of 7/9/2019.

    1.VEGETABLES
    POTATOES
    Russets: The market on russets is up this week. Burbanks out of Idaho are up on 70 count, 90 count and 6 oz. minimum size. Moderate supply and good demand and quality are being reported out of Idaho.Reds: The red potato market is steady this week. Product out of Kern District, California; and Eastern Shore, Virginia is steady with lighter supply and good demand.Yellows: The markets out of both Florida and California are steady. Quality is good, with moderate supply and demand.
    CABBAGE
    Round Green: The cabbage market is down this week. Supply,demand, and quality are good.
    LEAF LETTUCE
    Green Leaf: The green leaf market is down this week. Green leaf yield is slightly down, mainly because of recent changes in temperature this time of year. As far as quality, there is some irregular sizing, fringe/wind burn and occasional internal burn. Demand is good.Romaine: The romaine market is up this week. Romaine supplies are expected to be light this week, due to a production gap and quality issues at the field level. Demand is good. As far as quality, mildew pressure has been emerging, including mechanical damage and bruising on the greener romaine.
    ICEBERG LETTUCE
    The iceberg market is up this week. Iceberg supplies will be light this week, due to a production gap and quality issues at the field level.
    GARLIC
    Domestic garlic is steady this week, with good supply, demand,and quality being reported.
    ONIONS
    THE jumbo yellow onion market is mixed this week. Product out of San Joaquin Valley, California is down, while product out of New Mexico is up. There is moderate supply and good demand.Product out of Georgia is steady, with moderate supply and good demand. Supply gaps are expected to continue for another week,due to the weather.
    MUSHROOMS
    There are no issues to report on mushrooms coming off the East Coast, with good supplies, demand, and quality. There continues to be issues on mushrooms coming from the West Cregarding supply and quality..
    CILANTRO
    The cilantro market is up this week. Product out of Oxnard,California and Central Coast, California is up on 30’s and on 60’s, with moderate supply and good demand.
    CUCUMBERS
    Cucumber prices are steady to up for the week. The West is reporting price increases as supplies tighten up. The East has several growing regions right now, with pricing varying from each area. Quality is fair, with soft ends being reported in the fields.
    CELERY
    The celery market is down this week. Supply, demand, and quality are good.
    YELLOW SQUASH
    Yellow Squash is mixed this week. In the East, pricing up in the Carolinas while going down in Michigan. The markets after the price changes look to be even with each other. The West looks to be flat for the week. Yellow Squash continues to battle wind scarring.
    ZUCCHINI
    Zucchini is following the same trend as Yellow Squash, with mixed pricing. The West looks to be flat, while the East is mixed. The Carolinas are showing a price increase, while Michigan is dropping their price. The prices between the regions are almost identical now with these changes. Zucchini quality looks to be good for the week.
    GREEN BEANS
    The green bean market is down this week. Machine-picked product out of Eastern Shore Virginia and imported haricotverts are down,with moderate supply and demand.
    BELL PEPPERS Green:
    Green peppers are steady in pricing for the week.Current volumes are meeting the current demand, with quality trending towards good.Red: Red bell peppers look to be flat for the week in pricing.The East continues to pull from hothouses to cover demand,while the West is relying on Mexico for supply. Quality is a mixture of fair to good for the time being.
    TOMATOES Rounds:
    Round tomatoes are steady, to down for the week.Small size fruit looks to be steady while larger sizes are showing a slight price drop. The West is supplied by Mexico and California for now. The East has several regions growing product. Quality is fair, with soft fruit being reported in the fields.
    Romas: Roma tomato prices are steady to up for the week.The East supply is spread out amongst several areas, while the West has product from Mexico and California. Quality is fair to good, with the biggest issue being soft fruit.Cherry: Cherry tomatoes prices look to be flat for the week.
    Supply from Florida and Mexico looks to be covering the current demand. Quality is good in both regions.
    Grape: Grape tomatoes are up in pricing for the week. Supplies remain light in both the East and West. Quality is trending fair to good for the time being.
    CARROTS
    The jumbo carrot market is up, this week. Product out of California is up with moderate supply and good demand. Product out of Mexico is up, with moderate supply and good demand, but quality continues to vary.
    GREEN ONIONS
    The green onion market is steady this week. Product out of Mexico is steady on medium and on small with moderate supply and light demand. Product out of South Carolina is steady, with lighter supply and good demand.
    CAULIFLOWER
    The cauliflower market is down this week. Supplies are expected to be around normal. Demand and quality are good. From a quality standpoint, not much of a change this week, except for some slight discoloration and cream color in low percentages. Size and texture are expected to be good.KEY– Anticipating an up market– Anticipating a steady market– Anticipating a down market

    The data contained in the Farmer’s Report is provided for informational purposes only, is not tailored to your specific purchasing needs, and is not intended as a substitute for any other publicly-available market data or information. The Farmer’s Report is compiled from the last-received market data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or other market sources, and is subject to change without notice. Nothing herein is the opinion of US Foods®. US Foods neither assumes any legal liability nor makes any warranty or guaranty, either express or implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy or usefulness of this information.

    2 PRODUCE
    ASPARAGUS
    The asparagus market is up this week. Product out of Peru is up, with lighter supply and moderate demand. Quality will vary out of Peru. Product out of Mexico is up with lighter supply and good demand.
    BROCCOLI
    The broccoli market is up, and supplies will be around normalthis week. Demand is good. As far as quality, minimal brownbead and yellow discoloration will be present this week.
    HANGING FRUIT APPLES AND PEARS
    Apples: All apple varieties are steady this week, with moderatesupply and demand, except for Golden Delicious, which is upthis week. Washington has few Golden Delicious remaining tobridge the gap until the new crop harvests around August.
    Pears: The pear market remains stable. Green and redD’Anjou and Bosc are available. The small end of pearsremains tight, while 90 count and larger remain constant.
    CITRUS
    LEMONS
    The price of lemons is steady to up for this week. Demand on140 counts and smaller is extremely high. Chilean lemons havehit the market, but prices are still high. Quality out of Californiais fair at best, but is looking to improve week over week.
    LIMES
    Lime prices look to be down for this week. Mexico is battling some rainstorms, which could delay harvests and impact quality. For now, quality is fair, due to the age of the current crop, along with the rainstorms.
    ORANGES
    Valencia prices look to be steady for the time being. Valencia continue to trend toward the 113/88/138 size ranges. Quality continues to be strong. Offshore navels are expected to arrive in the next couple of weeks from Chile and South Africa.
    BERRIES STRAWBERRIES
    The strawberry market is flat this week. Strawberry demand continues to exceed supply. Quality is improving slightly, and these market conditions are expected through the week.
    BLACKBERRIES
    Blackberries are looking good, and are expected to increase in volume in the next 3-4 weeks out of Watsonville-Salinas.
    RASPBERRIES
    Raspberries are looking good, and are also expected to increasein volume in the next 3-4 weeks out of Watsonville-Salinas.
    BLUEBERRIES
    Oregon blueberries are firm, with good size and very few defects.Washington blueberry quality and supply are also good.
    GRAPES
    The grape market is mixed this week. Flame Seedless, Red Globe,and Summer Royal out of Mexico are steady. Sugarones out ofMexico are down on Large. Flame seedless and Scarlet Royal out of California are steady on Large-XL. Sugar ones out of California are up on L-XL. There is good supply and light demand.
    TROPICAL PINEAPPLES
    Pineapple prices are on the rise again. Supply continues to get tight, especially on larger-sized fruit. Quality is trending between fair and good.
    BANANAS
    Banana prices look to be flat for the week. Conditions are stable with the inbound supplies for the summer months. Quality continues to be good on all bananas.
    AVOCADOS
    Avocado prices have started to drop this week. Flora Loca crop in Mexico has begun to harvest, allowing supplies to rebound.The harvests are grading high, with a limited amount of fruit grading at #2. California harvests continue to wind down, and Peru continues to import product.
    MELONS CANTALOUPES AND HONEYDEWS
    Cantaloupes: The cantaloupe market is flat this week.Supplies have been good, though size profile has shifted slightly towards smaller-sized fruit. Harvesting in California began this week.Honeydews: The Honeydew market is flat this week. Supplies have been good, though size profile has shifted slightly towards smaller-sized fruit. Harvesting in California began this week.

    The data contained in the Farmer’s Report is provided for informational purposes only, is not tailored to your specific purchasing needs, and is not intended as a substitute for any other publicly-available market data or information. The Farmer’s Report is compiled from the last-received market data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or other market sources, and is subject to change without notice. Nothing herein is the opinion of US Foods®. US Foods neither assumes any legal liability nor makes any warranty or guaranty, either expressor implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy or usefulness of this information.

    3 BEEF
    All current beef pricing trends are based on USDA data as of July 10, 2019. Last week’s trends refer to the USDA market for the full week of July 1, 2019.Cash cattle traded slightly down to slightly up last week, with trades occurring between $107--115/cwt. This week’s asking prices from feeders are listed between $113--115/cwt. Bids have started to surface at the $110/cwt. mark.Harvest came in at 573K head for the week, which was lower than normal due to the Fourth of July holiday. Of that 573K head, 438K were of the steer/heifervariety. Harvest for the week of July 8, 2019 is expected to be back to normal, in the 660Khead range.77.1% of all steers/heifers graded Choice or Prime for the week ending June 28,2019, which was down from the week prior. Select grading was up at 19.6% andUngraded reported steady at 3.3%..GRINDSGROUND CHUCK: Ground chuck traded up a few cents last week, but it is showingthe opposite trend this week, down a few cents through three days of trading.GROUND BEEF 81/19: 81/19 ground beef was slightly down last week, and iscurrently down modestly through three days of trading this week.GROUND BEEF 73/27: 73/27 ground beef traded up slightly last week, and sofar is trading down a few cents in the current week.ROUNDSPEELED KNUCKLES: Peeled knuckles traded slightly up across all grades lastweek. Currently this week, both grades are trading down. The Choice grade isdown moderately, while the Select grade is slightly decreasing.INSIDE ROUNDS: Choice and Ungraded inside rounds took a small decreaselast week, while the Select insides were up a few cents. Through three days oftrading this week, all grades of inside rounds are trading flat compared to last week.BOTTOM ROUND FLATS: Choice and Select bottom rounds traded slightlydown to flat last week, respectively. Both grades are showing small declinesthrough three trading days this week.EYES OF ROUND: All grades of eye of rounds were slightly up last week intrading. Both grades are trading down modestly in the current week.LOINSSTRIPS: Choice-graded New York strips showed the largest decline in the beefcomplex last week, trading significantly lower than the week prior. Select stripswere also down, but only modestly. Currently, both grades are down modestlythrough three days of trading this week.TOP BUTTS: Choice top butts took a nice increase last week, and the Selectgrade was down a few cents. The grades seem to have flipped in the currenttrading week, with the Choice grade showing a small loss and the Select gradewith a nice gain through three days.TENDERLOINS: Choice tenderloins were down modestly last week, but bothSelect and Ungraded product took healthy increases. Currently, graded tenderloinsare down modestly this week.RIBSRIBEYES: Heavy and light ribeyes were both down across the board last week,with the one bright spot being Ungraded heavies, which were up a few cents.Taking the brunt of the loss were Choice lights and Select heavies, showingmoderate losses. Expect more downside this week, as all grades of both lightand heavy ribeyes are down quite moderately through three days of trading.CHUCKSCHUCK ROLLS: Choice rolls were slightly up, and Select product took a smallloss last week. The market appears to be similar on all chuck rolls this week.TERES MAJOR MUSCLE: Choice Teres Majors were down slightly last week,but both the Select grade and Ungraded product took healthy gains. Choice productis currently showing a loss of a few cents in the current week, and Select productis showing a little larger of a loss.BRISKETS: Briskets were down across the board on all grades last week, andlook to be continuing a similar trend midway through the week. Briskets typicallysoften through the summer months.THIN MEATSBALL TIPS: Ball tips took nice gains across the board last week. However, exactlythe opposite is happening through three days of trading this week, and ball tips mayhave peaked for the year. Both grades of ball tips are showing modest decreases.FLAP MEAT: Flap meat was up across the board last week, led by Choice flapmeat, which was up significantly and was the largest up-mover across all beefitems. Choice product is currently trading slightly up, and Select product iscurrently trading slightly down this week so far.FLANK: Flank steak was down slightly across all grades last week. Choice productis trading slightly up so far this week, and Select flanks are trading slightly down.SKIRT STEAK: The outside skirt market was up very slightly last week. A similarpattern is occurring midway through this trading week.The data contained in the Farmer’s Report is provided for informational purposes only, is not tailored to your specific purchasing needs, and is not intended as a substitute for any other publicly-available market data or information. The Farmer’s Report is compiled from the last-receivedmarket data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or other market sources, and is subject to change without notice. Nothing herein is the opinion of US Foods®. US Foods neither assumes any legal liability nor makes any warranty or guaranty, either expressor implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy or usefulness of this information.

    4 PORK
    Pork market information is from the week of July 1, 2019.Last week the USDA estimated hog slaughter was 2.072 MM, lower than the previousweek, due to the reduced holiday harvest, but 4.4% higher than the same week lastyear. Over the past six weeks, the hog slaughter has averaged 7.5% larger than inthe same time frame last year.The USDA released monthly export numbers for May. Total pork exports in May wererelatively flat compared to 2018, and down 4% year-to-date.LOINSPrices in the loin complex were mixed. Historically, pricing can be choppy, dependingon the success of Fourth of July promotions. Last year, loin prices moved directionallylower following the holiday.TENDERSPork tenderloin prices moved slightly higher. Pricing has slowly been movingdirectionally higher in a very choppy manner. Historically, tenderloin prices peak forsummer grilling sometime in July or August, so prices are still expected to have somemore upside risk until a definite downward trend is observed.BUTTSPork butt prices moved lower. Supply remains sufficient, due to the larger harvestlevels. Retailers may gravitate off butts and towards loins, due to a more favorableprice point. Traditionally, pork butt prices move gradually lower from July into earlyAugust.RIBSThe rib complex remains unstable. The Fourth of July holiday typically marks the apexof rib pricing during the calendar year, before it crests and moves progressively lowerinto fall. Sparerib pricing has already moved sharply lower and will likely stabilizequickly. Backrib prices are beginning to move lower, and should continue that patternfor the next few months.BELLIES/BACONWhile the belly market normally reaches its annual peak this time of year, it iscounter-seasonally lower. Last year, belly prices fell significantly from mid-Julythrough late August, but given how differently the belly market has performed thisyear, analysts consider forecasting challenging, and consider the market volatile.HAMSHam prices continued to move lower, but the rate of decline has slowed. Analystsbelieve prices have dipped to levels that may encourage demand. In addition, themarket believes that the new trade agreement with Mexico may support ham prices.Last year, ham prices were up and down from July through October.TRIMMINGSTrimming prices continued to move lower. The Fourth of July holiday is usually asignificant driver of increasing trimming prices, due to hot dog promotions at retail.Now that the holiday has passed, trimming prices historically move lower into fall.PICNICSPrices for both the bone-in and boneless picnics moved lower. Boneless picnic pricesare falling in correlation to lean 72% trimmings, as processor demand has reached itsseasonal peak. Bone-in picnics typically move lower from July to September.The data contained in the Farmer’s Report is provided for informational purposes only, is not tailored to your specific purchasing needs, and is not intended as a substitute for any other publicly-available market data or information. The Farmer’s Report is compiled from the last-receivedmarket data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or other market sources, and is subject to change without notice. Nothing herein is the opinion of US Foods®. US Foods neither assumes any legal liability nor makes any warranty or guaranty, either expressor implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy or usefulness of this information.

    5 CHICKEN TURKEY BONELESS, SKINLESS TURKEY BREASTS
    Boneless, skinless turkey breasts remained unchanged during the week of July 13,2019. In the near term, the market trend expectation should be flat to slightly upward.WHOLE FROZEN TURKEYS
    The whole turkey market was unchanged during the week of July 13, 2019.Near-term, the expectation should be that this market trends flat to slightly upwardas we enter the summer months.Medium and jumbo wing markets were flat during the week ending July 13, 2019.The small wing market saw a slight decrease, due to lower demand from theFurther Processing arena. The small boneless breast market was flat during the week ending July 13, 2019, as further processors have reduced their demand inthe near term. Analysts expect this to be a short-lived situation, due to lack ofbirds in this size category. The jumbo and medium breast markets were down;with the lack of demand and increases in supply, analysts expect this market tocontinue a gradual downward movement. Jumbo tenders were flat this week, asthis market is currently in a balanced to tight position, without any spot offeringsbeing discovered. The select/small tender market was flat. This category remainsshort of supply and well-supported by the ongoing lack of supply and the YTDheadcount deficit in the small bird arena.Export demand on boneless breast and dark meat continues to be at betterthan normal levels, trending flat to upward. Bone-in thigh markets and drumstickswere slightly up the week ending July 13, 2019. As export demand continues anupward climb, slight incremental increases should be expected in all dark meatcategories near-term. Whole birds/WOG demand has balanced out, incurring a slightprice increase. The trend for the near term is expected to be flat to slightly upward.
    BROILER-TYPE EGGS SET IN THE UNITED STATES UP 1%Hatcheries in the United States weekly program set 233 million eggs in incubatorsduring the week ending July 6, 2019, up 1% from a year ago. Average hatchabilityfor chicks hatched during the week in the United States was 82.9 percent. Averagehatchability is calculated by dividing chicks hatched during the week by eggs setthree weeks earlier.** Starting in 2018, the 19 State totals have been discontinued. **BROILER-TYPE CHICKS PLACED IN THE UNITED STATES UP 1%Broiler growers in the United States weekly program placed 187 million chicks for meat production during the week ending July 6, 2019, up 1% from a year ago.Cumulative placements from the week ending January 5, 2019 through July 6, 2019for the United States were 5.03 billion, up 1% from the same period a year earlier.** Starting in 2018, the 19-State totals have been discontinued. **
    WHOLE CHICKEN & CUT-UP PARTS
    Small bird supply and demand is still out of balance, pushing pricing higher, asdemand is hard to fulfill. This trend should be expected to continue through 2019. Themarket for medium and jumbo whole birds and WOGs has slightly inclined, primarilydue to processors catching up from the Fourth of July holiday week. Analyst expect apotential increase in supply over the next few weeks, which could develop into slightdecreases in pricing for the near term.
    BONELESS, SKINLESS BREASTS & CHICKEN TENDERLOINS
    The select/small boneless breast market was flat the week of July 13, 2019. Thismarket continues to be supported by the YTD headcount deficit in the small birdcategory. The select/small market might continue to trend flat to slightly downward in the near term. The medium boneless breast market was down, with spot loadofferings increasing in volume. The jumbo boneless breast category was down, withspot product being offered, although deep discounting is still not taking place. Lookingnear-term, analysts expect this market to continue a flat to gradual downward trendas bird weights increase, as well as some processors switching from a medium to ajumbo bird; they expect this market could continue a flat to downward movement.During the week of July 13, 2019, the select/small and jumbo tenderloin marketswere flat. Further Processors and retailers continue to support these markets, withexpectations of a flat to upward movement in the near term.
    WINGS The small wing market was down the week of July 13, 2019 with expectations that this market will trend flat to downward for the near term. The medium wing marketwas flat, with spot load offers being consistently harder to uncover. Analysts believe the expectation should be that the medium market remains flat to upward in thenear term. The jumbo wing market followed the same pattern as the small, remaining unchanged for the week of July 13, 2019. Analysts believe that the jumbo market isexpected to trend flat to upward, as we enter the typical seasonal high wing demandin the upcoming months.
    BONELESS, SKINLESS THIGHS
    The boneless, skinless thigh meat market was flat the week of July 13, 2019. Analysts believe that this market should be fully supported by both increased export anddomestic demand, and are reporting that the expectation should be that this markettrends flat to slightly upward in the near term.

    The data contained in the Farmer’s Report is provided for informational purposes only, is not tailored to your specific purchasing needs, and is not intended as a substitute for any other publicly-available market data or information. The Farmer’s Report is compiled from the last-receivedmarket data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or other market sources, and is subject to change without notice. Nothing herein is the opinion of US Foods®. US Foods neither assumes any legal liability nor makes any warranty or guaranty, either expressor implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy or usefulness of this information.

    6 COMMODITY OIL
    SOY, CANOLA & PALM OIL
    The August soybean oil contract struggled above the $.2850 level the week of July 1,2019. Soybean oil basis levels remain firm, as vertically integrated crushers continueto move oil into the biodiesel channel, leaving availability for food use relatively tight.
    SOY OIL:• The USDA estimated end of May soybean oil stocks at 2.018 billion lbs., below theaverage trade guess of 2.082 billion and nearly 350 million below last year.• On May 10, 2019 U.S. tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods were moved upto a 25% rate from 10% previously, while the US also stated that they were workingon 25% tariffs for an additional $325 billion worth of Chinese goods going forward.• Trade negotiations between China and the US are set to start up again,after what were reported as ‘promising’ negotiations which took placeat the G20 summit.
    CANOLA• The canola seed market was down the week of July 1, 2019, with new cropfutures making new contract lows on July 5, 2019.• The Canadian Prairies have seen some much needed rainfall over the last 10 days.• It has been reported that there has been no progress in the ongoing disputebetween Canada and China. Analysts are reporting that canola seed stocks arebuilding with the loss of their largest importer ,and canola oil basis remains weakas a result of the cheaper forward seed prices.
    PALM OIL• Malaysian palm oil stocks fell over 10% during the month of May, but are still wellabove last year’s level. Palm oil prices were mostly steady, and continue to follow the lead of the soybean oil market.

    6 DAIRY
    All dairy pricing trends are based on USDA and CME data as of July 9, 2019
    BUTTER
    Butter production is mixed, primarily driven by the strong cream demand from other seasonal producers continuing to pull butterfat, affecting the amount available for spot butter makers. Demand is steady in all regions. CME butter markets are eventhis week, as prices are taking a breather after inching higher the past month or so.
    CHEESE
    Even at these higher prices, demand has remained firm. Production rates wereactive during the holiday-shortened week, despite some more expensive milk forthis time of the year. Inventories are still available, but analysts are reporting thatthe combination of seasonally slower milk production and the firm buying demandare allowing producers to start reporting tighter supplies. The market is stillattempting to determine how high prices need to reach, but reports indicate thatprices are starting to feel a little more pressure, as buyers get what they needto cover.
    SHELL EGGS
    Analysts are reporting that demand has been mixed, where higher prices have slowedpurchases from some buyers. Inventories have remained at comfortable levels, butreports of stronger orders from some suppliers have led analysts to believe that thiscould point towards tightening availability.

    Foodservice demand has been firm, as the increased summer travel has seasonally improved orders.

    MILK & CREAM
    Milk production across the US has entered a seasonal slowdown, with smaller herds and warming temperatures reducing output estimates. Demand has slowed comparedto Q2, coinciding with school summer break.

    The data contained in the Farmer’s Report is provided for informational purposes only, is not tailored to your specific purchasing needs, and is not intended as a substitute for any other publicly-available market data or information. The Farmer’s Report is compiled from the last-receivedmarket data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or other market sources, and is subject to change without notice. Nothing herein is the opinion of US Foods®. US Foods neither assumes any legal liability nor makes any warranty or guaranty, either expressor implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy or usefulness of this information.

    8 SEAFOOD
    All seafood pricing trends are based on Urner Barry data and supplier quotes as ofJuly 9, 2019.
    SHRIMP, DOMESTIC(WHITES AND BROWNS): The current catch is producing larger shrimp in the16/20, 21/25 and 26/30 ranges. This goes along with the reports that all the freshwater coming out of the Mississippi River has pushed the smaller shrimp furtherout into the Gulf of Mexico. Smaller shrimp will have a lot of pressure on availabilityand price.
    (DOMESTIC PUDS): Smaller PUD’s are becoming tight, as they have beenpushed further out into the Gulf of Mexico with the influx of water coming outof the Mississippi River, which traditionally puts pressure on this category. UrnerBarry is reporting higher pricing across the category.
    SHRIMP, IMPORTED(BLACK TIGERS AND WHITES): The seafood industry is seeing pressure oninventory, and higher pricing on both white shrimp and black tigers. Large-sizewhites, 26-30 and larger in all varieties, are under a ton of pressure due to seasonal demand and lower inventory domestically.
    (MEXICAN BROWNS AND WHITES): Suppliers have a concern on browns, aswell as large-size shrimp that are in very tight supply.
    CATFISHDOMESTIC: The warm weather is allowing more feeding of fish. While productioncontinues to improve, overall there are still shortages until the producers can operateat full capacity.IMPORTED: Industry data is reporting rising prices.
    SALMON ATLANTIC FARMED SALMON: The fresh market has mostly stabilized, with somespot opportunity. Frozen portions have remained steady at this time, but will bemoving up as we get into Q3. Reports indicate that there is still a concern that 4 oz.portions will get tight, as the size of fish needed to produce that size is in short supply.
    MAHI-MAHIPricing has turned steady,with fewer offerings. Inventory is in good shape along allsize portions.
    SCALLOPSSEA: Pricing has turned steady. The catch is going well for the new season.BAY: Pricing is moving upward, as analysts see product from China entering theUS after tariff increases.
    TILAPIADemand has been steady; however, analysts believe the market will now see highercosts moving into Q3 due to additional tariffs.
    PANGASIUSPricing is trending downward, as inventory levels in the US are in very good shape.
    WHITEFISH COMPLEXCOD: Atlantic cod pricing is being finalized for Q3, and our vendors are expectingincreases. It is expected that Pacific cod will be mostly stable to start, but couldfirm moving forward.
    POLLOCK: The fishery for Pacific pollock has produced only smaller 2-4 oz.fillets. It is expected that this could cause an inventory issue for frozen loins ifthey don’t start catching larger fish. Larger fillets of 4-6 and 6-8 oz. are very tight.
    HADDOCK: Vendors are reporting that pricing will be moving up for Q3, behindadditional tariffs, high demand, and tight supply.
    FLOUNDER: Inventory levels are in good shape. Analysts expect pricing will firmon goods coming from China, due to the additional tariffs. Fish from Argentinashould start to firm up as the season changes.
    TUNA, YELLOWFIN(FROZEN STEAKS & LOINS): Tuna pricing and inventory is stable.
    SWORDFISH
    Swordfish pricing is very stable. Inventory levels are in very good shape.
    KING CRAB(RED & GOLDEN): Product is very short in the marketplace and will be tightongoing. Some spot opportunity exists.
    CRABMEAT(BLUE & RED, PASTEURIZED): The market is showing an imbalance inmovement and pricing. Inventory seems to be in good shape overall. As the summerdemand starts to kick in over the coming weeks, this should stabilize the market.Mexico Blue Crab season is beginning to slow, as is common this time of year.Pricing is stable and supply is fair.
    SNOW CRABALASKAN: Most vendors are off the market, with very little if any product outthere currently.
    CANADIAN: The Canadian fisheries are starting to end. As pricing is nowstabilizing at higher levels, analysts believe it could move higher through Q3.
    LOBSTER NORTH AMERICAN LOBSTER: Pricing is steady to firm. Small-sizes tails and meat seem to be in decent shape. Large-size tails continue to be a challenge. Maine is expected to be underway toward the end of July.
    LOBSTER TAILS WARM WATER: The industry is extremely tight, with no new production set until the season starts in August. Very little product will be available.
    LOBSTER MEAT: Pricing and demand are steady.

    The data contained in the Farmer’s Report is provided for informational purposes only, is not tailored to your specific purchasing needs, and is not intended as a substitute for any other publicly-available market data or information. The Farmer’s Report is compiled from the last-received market data provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and/or other market sources, and is subject to change without notice. Nothing herein is the opinion of US Foods®. US Foods neither assumes any legal liability nor makes any warranty or guaranty, either expressor implied, regarding the completeness, accuracy or usefulness of this information.

    https://www.usfoods.com/content/dam/...mersReport.pdf
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