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Thread: Heads up ALIPACers! William needs a fast ruling on this one.. fake or real news?

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  1. #1
    Administrator ALIPAC's Avatar
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    Heads up ALIPACers! William needs a fast ruling on this one.. fake or real news?

    Post one of two words followed by your explanation please.

    Is this fake or real news? We need to know fast.

    Fake or Real?


    Terror suspect in US troop bombing is a migrant caravan organizer

    Terror suspect in US troop bombing is a migrant caravan organizer

    Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa, originally from Honduras, was granted political asylum status in 1987 and has lived in Mexico for the past 30 years. Seated at the El Barretal shelter, Guerrero joined the migrants caravan in Cordoba, just south of Mexico City, on November 4, 2018. (Nelvin C. Cepeda/San Diego Union-Tribune/TNS)

    December 13, 2018 Laura Widener


    A new report has revealed that one of the Central American migrant caravan leaders is an accused terrorist.
    Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa, who organized a migrant march on the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana this week, was the primary suspect in a 1987 bombing that injured six U.S. troops in Honduras, The Daily Caller reported Wednesday.

    On Tuesday, Ulloa led a group of 100 migrants to the U.S. Consulate office in Tijuana, where they demanded the Trump Administration grant them entry into the U.S. or pay them each $50,000 to return home, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported.
    “It may seem like a lot of money to you,” Ulloa said on Tuesday. “But it is a small sum compared to everything the United States has stolen from Honduras.”

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    His participation in the caravan’s efforts have been well-documented on his Facebook page.
    A New York Times story from 1987 reported that Ulloa was the suspect named behind the August 1987 incident in which a bomb was planted in a Chinese restaurant in Honduras, injuring six U.S. troops and a Honduras civilian.
    Ulloa fled to Mexico, where he received permanent asylum. U.S. officials protested Mexico’s decision, to which Mexico dismissed concerns on the account that then-22-year-old Ulloa was a “freedom fighter” who faced persecution over his political beliefs.

    A December 1987 Congressional appropriations bill confirmed Ulloa as a suspected terrorist in their findings on the bombing.
    “The bomb was directed at American soldiers and did in fact wound American soldiers and an American contractor,” it said, adding that U.S. service members “were in Honduras assigned to Joint Task Force Bravo.”

    “Honduras authorities have named Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa as a suspect in this act of terrorism and have a warrant for his arrest,” the document said.
    The document accused the Mexican government of harboring a terrorist in spite of international law, and further called on Mexico to “turn Mr. Guerrero over to the Government of Honduras.”
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    However, Ulloa asserts he was falsely accused of the crime.

    In a Facebook post from July 30, 2017, he lamented over the lack of apology from Honduras and the U.S. over the allegation, and blames Jorge Arturo Reina Idiaquez for being the mastermind in the incident.
    In the post, however, he criticized the presence of American bases in Honduras, and indicated that Honduras would be free when “Gringos trash” was removed from Honduras.

    He also admitted, “I was a member of the RPF Lorenzo Zelaya.”

    Popular Revolutionary Forces-Lorenzo Zelaya was a radical group that admitted to hijacking a Honduran airliner and taking 10 hostages, eight of which were American, the New York Times reported.
    A global terrorism report published by the U.S. State Department in April 1990 named the group among Honduran-based “leftist guerrilla groups that have resorted to terrorist attacks.”

    “We were revolutionaries but not guerrillas, because we did not have weapons,” Ulloa insisted.





    https://americanmilitarynews.com/201...DLebOg5BosLXHs
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  2. #2
    Senior Member stoptheinvaders's Avatar
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    Site appears legimate
    Links in article appear legimate
    Owner of site appears legimate
    My Fake news meter is not hitting the red zone.

    Need more time but quick reply is It isn't Fake Fake
    ALIPAC likes this.
    You've got to Stand for Something or You'll Fall for Anything

  3. #3
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    Washington Times


    Migrant caravan members demand $50,000 apiece to go back home ...
    https://www.washingtontimes.com/.../...nd-50000-apiec...

    Dec 12, 2018 - Accused 'terrorist' behind migrant caravan members demand of $50,000 ... Central American migrants march to the U.S. consulate in Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Dec. ... “It may seem like a lot of money to you,” organizer Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa told the San .... 2, 2019 photo, U.S. Army troops place additional ...
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  4. #4
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    12/18/18 ALIPAC

    Man who suggested $50,000 payout for caravan migrants removed from shelter


    "Guerrero left Honduras in 1987 after being accused of planting a bomb in a Chinese restaurant that injured six U.S. soldiers in Honduras. Guerrero claimed the charges were false and, despite protests from the U.S. government, Mexico offered him political asylum. Now 54, he has spent the last 31 years living in Mexico City selling inexpensive jewelry. It is unclear what will happen to him now."
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  5. #5
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    ALIPAC likes this.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    ALIPAC likes this.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    The man who demanded $50,000 for each Honduran returning home plans a liberation movement from the migrant shelter


    Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa, originally from Honduras, was granted political asylum status in 1987 and has lived in Mexico for the past 30 years. Standing at the El Barretal shelter, Guerrero joined the migrants caravan in Cordoba, just south of Mexico City, on November 4th. (Nelvin C. Cepeda / San Diego Union-Tribune)



    Gustavo Solis and Wendy Fry Contact Reporter


    Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa, the unofficial spokesperson of a group of Honduran migrants who caused an uproar by suggesting the U.S. pay $50,000 to each person who returns home, hasn’t set foot in Honduras in more than three decades.
    He left his birthplace in 1987, after being accused of planting a bomb in a Chinese restaurant that injured six U.S. soldiers in Honduras. Guerrero claimed the charges were false and, despite protests from the U.S. government, Mexico offered him political asylum.

    Guerrero, 54, has spent the last 31 years living a quiet life in Mexico City. Until recently, he earned a living selling bracelets, earrings and necklaces.


    But it hasn’t amounted to much. Guerrero says he has $10 to his name and does not have a bank account.


    His quiet life changed on Nov. 4, when he joined a caravan of Central Americans migrants heading north to the United States. He caught up with the group in Córdoba, about 180 miles southeast of Mexico City.


    “It’s a joy to be able to serve my country again,” Guerrero said from the El Barretal migrant shelter in Tijuana. “Sleeping here in the cold, eating what everyone else is eating, brings me joy.”


    Seated in his sleeping area of the shelter, Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa joined the migrants caravan in Cordoba, just south of Mexico City on November 4th and has been with since, to include at the new shelter in Matamoros, Tijuana. (Nelvin C. Cepeda / San Diego Union-Tribune)

    Guerrero said he joined the caravan after seeing it on the news. He wanted to help and spread his political message opposing Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez.

    As soon as he joined the caravan, Guerrero clashed with organizers who wanted to keep politics out of what they described as a humanitarian movement. But Guerrero persisted. He says a small group of migrants joined his cause and the group slowly grew over time.


    Guerrero sees the migrants’ flight out of Honduras as part of a larger movement. He says rampant crime, poverty and corruption are all linked to politics. In an interview, he repeatedly said the migrants’ goal is to “liberate Honduras.”


    In 1987, Guerrero created tension between the Mexican and U.S. governments after a bomb exploded in the China Palace near the largest U.S. military base in Honduras, Six U.S. soldiers and a Honduran civilian were injured. The man who confessed to taking part in the bombing and who implicated Guerrero later said he had been tortured by the military into making a false confession, which brought renewed scrutiny into the human rights record of Honduras. Mexico diplomats called him a “freedom fighter” and granted him permanent asylum. The U.S. protested, calling him a “terrorist.”
    About 10 months ago, Guerrero started an online petition asking the U.S. to exonerate him.

    On Tuesday he led a group of 100 migrants to the U.S. Consulate in Tijuana asking President Donald Trump to either let the migrants into the United States or oust Hernandez from office and pay each migrant $50,000 to go back to Honduras. He based that figure on what he considers reparations from the U.S. for their intervention in Central America.


    “The United States is directly responsible for this humanitarian crisis,” he said. “Honduras is practically colonized by the United States.”

    The group decided on that figure during a general assembly last week. It started when someone asked the group what it would take for people to turn around and go back.

    Someone yelled that they’d leave for $10,000, someone else shouted $20,000. People kept throwing out numbers: $50,000 and $60,000.

    Some said they wouldn’t turn around for any price. Eventually they settled on $50,000.


    Seated in his sleeping area of the shelter, Alfonso Guerrero Ulloa joined the migrants caravan in Cordoba, just south of Mexico City on November 4th and has been with since, to include at the new shelter in Matamoros, Tijuana. (Nelvin C. Cepeda / San Diego Union-Tribune)


    Guerrero sleeps in a small concrete room inside El Barretal surrounded by a small group of supporters — all of them young men. Inside the room is a small stockpile of toilet paper, pads, water bottles and an extension cord where people charge phones.
    Every couple of minutes, migrants poke their heads in the room and ask for supplies. Many call Guerrero by his nickname, “Comandante” or commander.

    Guerrero says he is not motivated by money and rejects accusations that he is using the migrant caravan for his own gain.


    “If in the last 30 years I haven’t taken advantage of another movement, do you think I’ll do it now when we are fighting for the liberation of Honduras?” he asked. “For me, freedom and the well being of my countrymen are more important than any amount of money.”


    The group’s letter gave the U.S. Consulate a 72-hour deadline to respond.


    Nobody in the migrant shelter has heard a response. But on Wednesday, the Department of Homeland Security criticized their proposal.


    “In case you haven’t seen, some of the so-called ‘asylum seekers’ at our Southern border are now demanding the United States pay them $50,000 to return to their home countries,” read a statement from DHS assistant press secretary Katie Waldman. “As we’ve said all along, based on historic data and open source reporting, the overwhelming majority of caravan members are not legitimate asylum-seekers — if they were they would seek refuge in the first safe country they entered.”


    The statement added that being a member of the caravan does not give migrants special rights for entry into the United States.


    On Wednesday, migrants had mixed reaction to the $50,000 demand. Many were unaware of it. Some supported it and others thought it was absurd.


    It’s unclear how many support Guerrero. About 100 marched with him to the U.S. Consulate Tuesday, but there are nearly 3,000 migrants sleeping in the shelter. Guerrero claims thousands support the letter.


    Lourdes Castillo, 50, of Honduras said the group doesn’t speak for all of the migrants although she did agree with some of the demands.


    “I wouldn’t take the money, but I think it’s a good idea to get rid of Juan Orlando Hernandez,” she said.


    Castillo plans to ask for asylum in the United States. She says her husband repeatedly abused her back home. She reported him to the police six or seven times but the beatings never stopped.


    Others thought the demand would do more harm than good by painting the migrants in a negative light.


    “It sounds like extortion,” said Nery Pineda, 39.

    “But if they offered it, everyone here would accept the money.”


    https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com...018-story.html

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  8. #8
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    Thank you team.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member JohnDoe2's Avatar
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    NO AMNESTY

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