Page 222 of 772 FirstFirst ... 122172212218219220221222223224225226232272322722 ... LastLast
Results 2,211 to 2,220 of 7720
Like Tree179Likes

Thread: BASIC LIST / SUGGESTED ITEMS FOR LONG TERM SURVIVAL

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

  1. #2211
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696


    Homestead Survival

    nice, get organized. Studio 5 - PVC Bin Storage Organizer

    Home Coach Frantz Ostmann shows us how to make a bin organizer out of PVC with a total cost of about $50.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  2. #2212
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696


    Homestead Survival

    wire cd holder for tupperware lids, neat
    Month-By-Month Storage Plan
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  3. #2213
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696


    Homestead Survival

    Rocks glued to felt by Martha Stewart. Love it
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  4. #2214
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696



    Homestead Survival

    Love Love Love it

    just a pic I shared to give folk inspiration to re use and recycle
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  5. #2215
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696



    Homestead Survival

    Love this chicken wire and clothepins on the wall, Pretty work spaces Thrifty Decor Chick: Pretty work spaces
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  6. #2216
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696


    Homestead Survival

    I am re-posting this for all the new folk because its awesome. That is a painted plywood floor and I love it.

    Painting a Bathroom Floor (a DIY painted rug) | | DIY Show Off
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  7. #2217
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696


    Homestead Survival

    old entertainment center into wow

    DIY Furniture Transformations
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  8. #2218
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    My Tactical Dry Box: An ammo heavy mixed-lot survival chest

    July 5, 2012 By Creek 4 Comments

    My favorite part about going to the dentist as a kid was the Pirate’s Chest of toys my Brother and I got to sift through after the appointment. There were all kinds of little trinkets to choose from: bouncy balls, spinning tops, rubber figurines and little parachute men. Well, years later, I now keep a little chest of my own except it’s full of ammunition, knives, tools, first aid items and survival supplies. The two chests are alike in that they both make me happy but that about where the similarity ends.

    My Tactical Dry Box



    I picked up this chest (18″x12″x10″) at a local Gander Mountain. It’s got a latch and rubber gasket which makes it water proof – hence the phrase ‘dry box’. When sealed it also floats.

    WHAT & WHY

    The basic premise behind my keeping this box is to have a nice little compact ‘ready-to-grab’ box of ammunition in a variety of calibers. This box is rugged and keeps everything dry. Most of my ammo I keep hidden or locked up and I like the idea of having a few hundred rounds of mixed-lot ammunition at the ready. Even if it’s for a day at the range or plinking in the back yard, having a grab-n-go box of ammo has its advantages. Toss it in the truck and go. I also look at my dry box as my Bug Out Bag’s combat trained body guard.

    So what’s in the box?

    Well, not just ammo. I keep a variety of survival supplies in there. It’s almost like a survival kit that’s heavy on ammo. There is a secret compartment under the lid which is a work in progress. Now, I just have some cash, a ferro rod, a multi-tool and some wire.



    There is a removable shelf once you open the lid. I keep an entire first aid kit on this shelf.



    Then, in the main compartment I keep a headlamp, an emergency blanket, a pair of wool gloves, 100 foot of 550 paracord and 425 rounds of ammunition. This kit is still a work in progress and there is room for more items – I just haven’t decided what else to include just yet.



    I hate cardboard ammo boxes!



    I picked up a few of these plastic ammo organizers from a dealer at a gun show. The brand is Berry Mfg. and I love these things. Here is a link: http://www.berrysmfg.com/products.aspx?c=3 They were only a couple bucks each.








    I leave the .22 rounds in the plastic containers they came in. Here’s my ammo breakdown:

    • 9mm – 100 rounds
    • 12 gauge shotgun – 25 mixed rounds
    • .22 long rifle – 150 rounds
    • .223 – 50 rounds
    • .38 special – 50 rounds
    • .357 – 50 rounds


    SUMMARY


    A nicely organized tactical dry box allows you to quickly grab a variety of ammo rounds – whether during a full on Bug Out, an afternoon hunt or just some plinking in the back yard. Everything is protected, dry and compactly stored in a durable, affordable and ready-to-go container… just enough, just in case.
    This dry box in it’s current state weighs in at 17.25 lbs.

    Remember, it’s not IF but WHEN,
    Creek


    Similar Posts:




    About Willow Haven Outdoor & Creek Stewart

    Creek Stewart is the Owner and Lead Instructor at Willow Haven Outdoor - a leading Survival and Preparedness Training Facility located on 21-acres in Central Indiana. For more information on Survival Courses and Clinics offered at WHO, click HERE. Creek is also author of the new book Build the Perfect Bug Out Bag: Your 72-Hour Disaster Survival Kit. His book is currently available for preorder on AMAZON.COM for only $11.20 - LIMITED TIME ONLY. If you enjoy Creek's Blog Posts, you will also enjoy his new book. You can contact Creek directly at creek@willowhavenoutdoor.com.

    My Tactical Dry Box: An ammo heavy mixed-lot survival chest |
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 09-17-2012 at 09:08 PM.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  9. #2219
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    The Solo Stove: When you just want to go Au Naturale

    September 4, 2012 By Creek 3 Comments

    When it comes to Bugging Out (and camping in general) Iím always testing new gear and trying to hone my kit to find that perfect mix of products and tools that feel Ďjust rightí. Itís been a while since Iíve changed out an important component of my kit because quite frankly Iíve been fairly satisfied with the items Iíve been using.

    Iíve been on a big push lately to find a natural fuel stove that I really like. I carry an Esbit folding stove with solid fuel tabs in my Bug Out Bag and Iím fine with that. The Esbit is a perfect little stove for 1-Cup meals in a 3-day disaster scenario and works very well. Iíve even used the Esbit with natural fuel before, but itís not ideal.

    When I go camping or take bush trips to practice skills I like to cook over an open fire, but sometimes I like the option of using a small cook stove as well Ė especially when Iím trying to be discreet or really want to leave-no-trace. There has also been a fire-ban here in the mid-west for most of the summer due to the drought- making open fires illegal. I really like the idea of using a small pack stove that works well with naturally gathered twigs, sticks, wood shavings, pine cones, etcÖ versus one that is dependent on other fuel: solid fuel tabs, alcohol, canister gas.

    Call me old fashioned, but I just like a wood fire. I see enough chemicals in my daily life and I really donít feel like burning chemicals when Iím in the woods.

    I also wanted one that was compact, lightweight, durable and affordable. After a lot of research I decided to go with the Solo Stove. Iíve heard about this stove from several of my students so I was excited to try it out when it showed up in the mail.


    Before I get too deep into this post, here are the specs directly from the Solo Stove Web-site:

    • Fast to boil: 8-10 minutes to boil 34 fl oz of water
    • Fuel: Burns sticks, pine cones and other biomass
    • Packed size: Height 3.8 inches, Width 4.25 inches
    • Assembled size: Height 5.7 inches, Width 4.25 inches
    • Weight: 9 oz
    • Materials: Hardened 304 stainless steel, nichrome wire



    The compact stainless stove comes packed is a little drawstring bag Ė this is a good thing as I will mention later.




    The pot holder is stashed up-side-down and to set it up you just flip it upright. Notice the cut-out in the pot holder. This is the spot where you drop in additional twigs and sticks as the fire burns.



    The Solo Stove is a double walled design and the outside wall has cutouts that feed the fire inside with plenty of oxygen.



    For intense breathability and so that ashes donít get in the way, there is a wire fire platform inside. This feature is critical to the efficiency of this stove.



    Now that the general overview is finished, I will be writing this post in 3 sections: PROS, CONS and FINAL CONCLUSION

    SOLO STOVE: PROS

    • Traditional Fire: I love building fires. I also love practicing starting fires. The Solo Stove maintains the authenticity of the fire building process. You still have to start a fire, you still have to fuel the fire with twigs and sticks and you still get the added bonus of having a real wood fueled flame. Nothing takes the places of a small calming camp fire companion. You hear the sticks pop and crack as they burn versus the annoying roar of a canister stove or the sizzle of solid fuel tabs. This is a true stick built fire stove.
    • Au Naturale: When I go into the woods, I want to keep things as simple as possible. The Solo Stove burns all natural fuel. Iíve never in my life been camping in an area where you couldnít find fuel for the solo stove. I carved up the little piles of fuel below in about 5 minutes from a few sticks in my yard. It literally uses small twigs and sticks as fuel. NOTE: I started the fire with a Dryer Lint PET BALL. ALSO NOTE: It had rained all morning and the sticks and twigs below were slightly moist.




    • FAST: This thing heats up fast. It only took about 4 minutes to bring my cup of pine needle tea to a rolling boil. I was shocked. I was really impressed with how incredibly easy it was to get my moist kindling going. Though I havenít done it yet, there is no doubt a few dry leaves and some small twigs would be all youíd need to get a Solo Stove fire blazing.









    • EFFICIENT: Wow, is this thing efficient. You can see by the beginning photos and the last photo up above how much kindling I burned. I expected there to be a can full of ash. To my surprise, there was just a thin layer of white ash in the bottom of the stove. Iím no physicist, but whoever designed this stove knew what they were doing. They call it ďGasificationĒ on the web-site. Hereís the quote: ďA unique gasification and secondary combustion process lets our stoves achieve a highly efficient and more complete burn. This means youíll use fewer twigs to achieve a boil. It also means less smoke.Ē Whatever that meansÖit works. Below is the picture of my ridiculously small ash pile which I made disappear with just one puff.







    • Compact & Lightweight: I donít mind the size at all. It tucks away nicely in my Get Home Bag (which is where Iíve decided to keep it). For those of you who carry a pot, it will probably slide right in it. It is super light too Ė only 9 0z. During use, the stove gets pretty hot. However, due to the double walled design it cools down very quick and is ready to stow away in just a few minutes.




    SOLO STOVE: CONS

    Iíll be honest, I donít have some serious critiques for this stove. However, Iíd like to point out a few things worth mentioning.


    • I thought my ex-girlfriend was high maintenance: If you want to do other things while cooking your dinner or making your tea, forget about it. This stove is so efficient that it require constant attention. You have to pretty much be fueling it from start to finish as it lays waste to whatever you stick in itís mouth. Itís not like a canister stove or even a traditional camp-fire where you can set out a pot and then do other things. You have to feed this hungry beast Ė constantly.






    • SOOT: Because you are burning natural wood and/or biomass, get ready for your pot to be a little sooty. I personally donít mind this but if you are the anal type, this might be a deal-breaker for you.
    • Simmer Me Gently: This stove pretty much has 2 settings: FULL ON and OFF. If you want to simmer something, this might be a little tricky. Maybe I just didnít mess around with it enough to figure it out, but I thought this was worth mentioning.


    FINAL CONCLUSION

    So if you, like me, are looking to go AU NATURALE with your stove fuel, Iíd definitely recommend considering the Solo Stove. Iíll be keeping mine in my Get Home Bag. I always prefer open pit camp fires, but the Solo Stove is the next best thing when you donít have that option. From a Survival/Preparedness perspective, itís a great piece of kit to have on hand. You already have enough fuel in your back yard to run this stove for countless meals or boilings. In a time when other fuels might be difficult (or expensive) to come by, youíll never run out of fuel to keep this little guy burning strong.

    The Solo Stove is $69.99 from http://www.solostove.com. I honestly believe this is a very fair price Ė especially considering that youíll never have to buy fuel again (gas, tabs, alcohol, etcÖ) I can testify that I think the stove is durable enough to last many, many years. As long as you donít abuse it, I actually canít identify a part that could break or malfunction.

    If any of you guys out there are using a different natural fuel stove Iíd love to hear about it in the comments section Ė Iím sure others would as well.

    Remember, itís not IF but WHEN,
    Creek
    Similar Posts:



    About Willow Haven Outdoor & Creek Stewart

    Creek Stewart
    is the Owner and Lead Instructor at Willow Haven Outdoor - a leading Survival and Preparedness Training Facility located on 21-acres in Central Indiana. For more information on Survival Courses and Clinics offered at WHO, click HERE. Creek is also author of the new book Build the Perfect Bug Out Bag: Your 72-Hour Disaster Survival Kit. His book is currently available for preorder on AMAZON.COM for only $11.20 - LIMITED TIME ONLY. If you enjoy Creek's Blog Posts, you will also enjoy his new book. You can contact Creek directly at creek@willowhavenoutdoor.com.


    The Solo Stove: All natural fuel stove |
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  10. #2220
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    South West Florida (Behind friendly lines but still in Occupied Territory)
    Posts
    117,696
    The Top 50 Survival Blogs!




    => View these other great Survival Blogs that almost made the Top 50!


    For Readers
    These are the top 50 blogs in the survival niche. By keeping their blogs up to date with news, ideas, and fresh and valuable content they provide you with the very best survival information. Share this list with everyone you know who is interested in learning survival.

    The Top 50 Survival Blogs!
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •