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Thread: BASIC LIST / SUGGESTED ITEMS FOR LONG TERM SURVIVAL

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  1. #7171
    Senior Member Airbornesapper07's Avatar
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    2023 Rifle Training for CHEAP!!!

    2023 RIFLE TRAINING FOR CHEAP!!!





    American Gun Chic
    American Gun Chic

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    Girl Schools Tim Pool on Firearms & "Stopping Power"!!

    GIRL SCHOOLS TIM POOL ON FIREARMS & "STOPPING POWER"!!





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    The CZ 600 Trail Ė Bolt Gun Glory

    by TRAVIS PIKE on NOVEMBER 13, 2022
    Related Tags: .223, 5.56, accurate rifles, bolt actions, Buzz, Feature Articles, Guns, PMAG, Rifles, Shooting

    Iíve never fancied bolt action rifles, but something about intermediate caliber bolt guns just appeals to me. Maybe itís the affordable ammo or the novelty of a .223 Rem caliber bolt action. I canít quite say, but when the CZ 600 Trail hit the market, I was entranced. While most people love CZ for their pistols or their various Scorpion and Bren incarnations, their bolt action rifles have always been rather nice.

    The CZ 600 series encapsulates a wide variety of rifles in a variety of calibers. This does include full-powered cartridges and traditional wood stocks and the like. The CZ 600 Trail model is a good bit different. It only comes in 5.56 and 7.62◊39 and uses either AR or Bren 2 magazines. Additionally, the rifle is designed to be very compact.

    The CZ 600 Trail is 100% Modular

    The weapon has a collapsing stock system thatís a bit wire-like in design. Itís very minimalist, with just a cheek rest to make it stand out. The receiver and barrel sit in a chassis system complete with all the M-LOK you could ever want. Itís very AR-like but obviously not an AR. Across the top, we have a very long monolithic sight rail for optics, night vision devices, and iron sights. Itís an unusual-looking rifle.

    Plenty of rifles use chassis-style designs, but not many are in .223 Remington, and not many use a PDW-type stock. Unusual draws me in, but performance keeps me.
    The CZ 600 Trail Rundown

    A 16.2-inch barrel is about as short as you can legally get with a rifle. That barrel is cold hammer forged and features a 1/2◊28 thread for all your favorite muzzle devices. The overall length is 35 inches with the stock deployed but only 27.2 with the stock collapsed entirely. The length of pull can be adjusted to 13.7 inches at the max position. The stock has four positions, and the cheek rest can be easily swapped to accommodate left-handed shooters.

    The collapsed stock makes it very compact

    At 6.1 pounds, the rifle isnít exactly tipping scales. CZ includes 10 round Magpul P-MAG with the .223 Remington version. Any other AR magazine can find its way into the gun. A 10-rounder is nice, but a 20-rounder is perfect for maximizing capacity and keeping the rifle nice and low. The rifle has an MSRP of $1,155.00.

    Features and Ergonomics

    Letís start with the good and work our way to the bad. The good is the massive oversized bolt handle on the 600 Trail. Itís huge and ribbed for an easy grip. Manipulating the smooth bolt and springing it into action is easy. With some practice, you can get your mad minute going fast.

    Look at that bolt action

    Another great feature is the ambidextrous controls. The magazine release and safety are entirely ambidextrous. They are both AR-type designs that a variety of shooters will certainly be used to. Speaking of AR-type, the grip is an AR-type design and can be replaced by any AR grip.

    I personally enjoy the grip CZ provided. It features adjustable backstraps that use the CZ P09 series backstraps to adjust the grip to your size. The included grip is nice and thin and heavily textured for a sure grip.

    Who doesnít love ambidextrous controls?

    The M-LOK handguard is plenty thin and nice to grip. It has plenty of room to attach a variety of lights, lasers, bipods, and beyond.

    The bad kind of comes down to the stock, and itís a mixed bad. Four positions allow for great adjustment, and the rifle can fit everyone from my massive frame to my sonís much smaller body type.

    A ten-round PMAG is included, but everything from a 5 t0 100 round magazine is available

    Thatís great, but like all PDW stocks, it has some wiggle to it, and you have to lock down on it tight to keep it from wiggling. This rifle has a sub-MOA claim, and the shakey stock seems counterproductive.
    Optical Options

    This rifle is all over the place in terms of acceptable optics. Like, you can shove anything on this thing. It seems plenty acceptable to toss on a red dot for those out to 200-yard engagements. An LPVO wouldnít be out of place, and neither would a 2.5-10X style optic. Heck, as a prism nerd, I just tossed on a Saber from Swampfox and called it a day.
    Itís a versatile rifle, and when adding optics, you really have to think about what you intend to do with the rifle. I also believe you should keep the rifle light and maybe avoid the 6-24X type optics.
    At the Range

    A sub-MOA guarantee, huh, well, Iím an average-to-mediocre shooter, so Iíll challenge that claim. After a very easy zero at 50 yards, I stepped back to 100 yards. I set up my gun with a bipod and assumed a supported position. I wanted to try and erase all of my shooting errors as much as possible.

    Recoil? What recoil?
    I set up my target and slowly fired three rounds. CZ delivered in the trigger department. Itís a two-stage trigger thatís fairly light and even adjustable if you float that way. The adjustable trigger has four positions that allow you to adjust the trigger weight between 1.3 to 3 pounds. I kept it at a stock three pounds, and 1.3 pounds feels scary light!
    At 100 yards, with some basic brass-cased Wolf Gold .223 Remington, I produced a .72-inch group measured from the center of the holes. Not bad, especially with the rather cheap ammo I was tossing through it.
    Rocking and Rolling

    The CZ 600 Trail has a little recoil to it. Nothing stout or heavy, but surprising. Being spoiled by semi-auto AR-15s has its effects on recoil perception. The end of the barrel is typically bare, and with a bare barrel, you do get some noticeable muzzle flash. A suppressor can make that disappear.

    Cycling the bolt is a blast. Especially trying to land rapid-fire shots. I used a series of clay pigeons positioned on the barm as targets and practiced shooting five as fast as possible at 50 and 100 yards. If I had to deck some rodents in the prairie dog family, Iíd have zero issues moving from target to target. The minimal recoil and fast cycling bolt, plus the good trigger and accuracy, make it easy to engage targets quickly and accurately.

    The cheekpiece is reversible for lefties.
    If I took this rifle on the trail or for a stalk, itíd be quite nice. The lightweight design makes it easy to tote and fast to the shoulder. While the rickety stock isnít perfect, itís workable. The collapsing design makes it easy to strap to the outside of a pack for the movement to set up camp.
    Hitting the Trail

    The CZ 600 Trail is a lightweight, modular rifle thatís a rather novel design. Itís easy to shoot and is a lot of fun to shoot. General gun season just opened for me, and I might be trying to bag a hog or deer with the 600 Trail. CZ continues to impress with their rifles, and Iím betting the rest of the 600 series is equally fantastic. MSRP: $1199
    Editorís Note: CZ has done a recall on the CZ 600. The CZ 600 was intended to have a user-replaceable barrel but apparently, the barrel can be installed incorrectly which can result in a catastrophic failure. See note below from CZ:
    CZ-USA has recently learned of a potential safety issue with the CZ 600 bolt-action rifles. CZ-USA is voluntarily initiating a recall of these rifles to protect the safety of its customers because of the potential for a catastrophic failure if the barrel is not installed correctly.
    To prevent the possibility of death or serious personal injury, you should immediately stop using your CZ 600 rifle and not load or fire it until it has been returned to CZ-USA to be inspected and modified.
    CZ 600 rifles were designed to allow the users to replace the barrels themselves to change the caliber. CZ-USA has learned that if the barrel is improperly installed, it is possible that the rifle could still be fired, but potentially result in a catastrophic failure. CZ-USA will correct this issue by permanently installing the barrels in CZ 600 rifles. As a result, the barrels on CZ 600 rifles will no longer be interchangeable. CZ-USA understands that this solution may not be acceptable to some of our customers, in which case we will issue a full refund upon presentation of a valid receipt for the purchase of your rifle.
    Related Posts:




    The CZ 600 Trail - Bolt Gun Glory - GunsAmerica Digest



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  4. #7174
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    The Holosun HS512C – Embrace the Enclosed Emitter

    by TRAVIS PIKE on NOVEMBER 20, 2022
    Related Tags: Buzz, Feature Articles, Holosun, Home Defense, optic reviews, Optics, Travis pike

    Holosun has been hitting hard with new optics every other month. The new hotness has been the AEMS, and it’s been getting a ton of attention. Sadly, the AEMS has caused a lot of shooters to overlook another similar option from Holosun called the HS512C. The HS512C shares a number of features with the AEMS and provides a cheaper and likely easier-to-find option versus the yet-to-be-released AEMS. I got mine from Gun Mag Warehouse, and they seem to be easy to find nearly everywhere.

    The HS512C is basically the HS510C, but they’ve enclosed the emitter. An enclosed emitter offers numerous benefits to the world of red dot optics. Before we dive into the pros and cons of enclosed emitters, let’s talk about HS512C’s specifications.

    Specifications

    The Holosun HS512C weighs 8.1 ounces, and that makes it a little heavier than most compact red dots. It’s 3.35 inches long and 1.66 inches wide. The optic comes with an integrated mount that adds a few ounces and places it at AR height that allows for an easy co-witness.

    The reticle packs ten daylight brightness settings and two-night vision settings. A single CR2032 battery powers the optic for 50K hours, and it’s backed by a pair of solar panels and a motion activate automatic shut down mode. If the optic is sat down for a bit without any movement, it automatically shuts off. When grabbed, the optic fires on and automatically returns back to the last brightness setting.

    The battery compartment has a locking lever.

    The window size is a nice .91 inches by 1.26 inches, and you get relatively little framework blocking out your peripheral vision. That actually makes it a hair bigger than the Eotech series of optics.

    We also get three reticles providing the HS512C with a 2 MOA Dot, 65 MOA Circle, and a combination of the 2 MOA circle and 65 MOA dot. I prefer the latter and will explain why a little later. On the durability side, the optic can be submerged up to a meter for 30 minutes and withstand 1000Gs of recoil. That’s a ton of recoil, and you won’t find a shoulder-fired rifle that can generate that level of force.

    The dual solar panels power the optic without a battery.
    To Enclose Or To Open?

    Why would you choose the enclosed emitter HS512C over the open emitter 510C? Well, first and foremost, an enclosed emitter guarantees reliability. Since the emitter is enclosed, nothing can get between the emitter and the lens. This includes rain, snow, mud, dust, dirt, or whatever else Murphy tosses at you.

    The optics sits perfectly for an absolute cowitness.

    The downsides are very few and mostly center around ergonomics. The hood makes the optic heavier than the 510C, nearly double the weight. The hood also adds a little more framing to block your peripheral vision. The HS510C is a light and easy-to-use optic and is well suited for home defense and competitive use.

    The two buttons make adjustments easy, as well as swapping reticles on the fly.

    However, the HS512C is much more reliable when things go outside. From a tactical perspective, the increase in reliability makes the HS512C is a much better option for duty use or even hunting in austere environments.
    A View To Kill For

    Through the lens, you’ll see a blue tint caused by the lens coating. If you want to see that red dot clear and crisp, then you’ll know why that big blue tint is necessary. It allows the red to stand out while allowing other colors to pass right through. Blue tint isn’t terrible but should be noted.

    The various reticles are all super crisp and clear. The 2 MOA dot is super easy to see and use, and I prefer the 2 MOA dot combined with the 65 MOA reticle. It’s Eotechish, and I’ve always loved the combination of circle and dot with various optics.

    The view through the HS512C is nice, wide, and unobstructed.

    The big ass 65 MOA circle provides shooters a quick to acquire red dot option that grips the eye and forces you to see it. The 2 MOA circle gives you a refined aiming point. I like this reticle for a variety of reasons, and being quick and easy to see is the first reason.
    Next, it’s very versatile. With a 50/200 zero, I can use the 2 MOA dot for any basic engagement range and use the 65 MOA circle for a variety of purposes. I can easily use it as a range finder. At 100 yards, a man-sized target will fill the circle. At two hundred yards, a man-sized target will fill the circle from the bottom to the 2 MOA dot. If the man-sized target doesn’t fit between the two, I know it’s closer or further away.

    A little sling tension makes precision shots a hair easier.

    A super close range, I can use the bottom of the reticle for precise CQB shots. Mechanical offset is a hassle with a standard red dot that requires a bit of guesswork. With the 65 MOA reticle, I can use the bottom stadia to place a precise shot at close range.
    Out to the Range

    I tossed the HS512C onto my Colt EPR and hit the ground running. Zeroing didn’t take long, but I will say the turrets kind of suck. Well, the elevation turret sucks. It provides a barely perceptible click for every adjustment. Also, holy crap, is it stiff to make adjustments. The windage turret provides very clean and very clicky adjustments. It seems like a QC failure between the two turrets.

    Cowitnessing is not an issue.

    However, the optic was zeroed without much issue, even though the elevation turret kind of sucked. Once I zeroed in, I went to a variety of ranges and lit up a variety of targets. The little 2 MOA dot made it plenty easy to touch small targets. My 4-inch gong got its spin plenty of times as I engaged it at 25 and 50 yards.
    Beyond 50 yards, I engaged larger gongs without much issue with the HS512C. A little 2 MOA dot inside a 65 MOA circle provides a clear sight picture for easy engagement of small targets. Even at 100 yards, my eight and 10-inch gongs got dinged and dinged over and over.

    The optic uses an enclosed emitter that ensures total reliability.

    I left the battery out and let the solar panels do their job. In the middle of a sunny Florida day, they had zero issues powering the optic. Even when I moved to the shade, the reticles remained bright and clear.
    That Big Reticle

    That big reticle made target transitions easily. I flew between targets with ease and lit up a variety of targets that were of different sizes. From big man-sized IPSC targets to little gongs and clay pigeons, the HS512C makes them all easy to engage. While an enclosed optic provides more frame to block your view, it’s tough to say it makes a big difference.

    I can see targets both big and small with my peripheral vision, and it makes zero difference from my perspective. I can move from big targets to little targets with ease. The big reticle is easy to track and makes reactive targets easy to dump rounds into.

    Engaging at various ranges is quite easy with the big reticle.

    Even moving from IPSC targets to clay pigeons, I had zero issues. That crisp, clear, and versatile reticle provides shooters a very easy-to-use option for targets small, large, as well as close and far.
    Duty Ready

    The HS512C is an outstanding optic for close-quarters shooting. It provides an enclosed optic option for those wanting something but is very effective and affordable. The HS512C is well suited for home defense, and I’d even take it on as a duty optic. The little fella is a fighter and provides an enclosed optic option that might be a little easier to find than the AEMS for the next few months.

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    The Holosun HS512C - Embrace the Enclosed Emitter (gunsamerica.com)


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  5. #7175
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    Winter Has Arrived In Europe!

    WINTER HAS ARRIVED IN EUROPE!



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    Treat burns by running affected skin under cold water for at least 20 minutes, advise experts

    Wednesday, December 21, 2022 by: Zoey Sky
    Tags: alternative medicine, burn remedies, Burns, clean water, Cosmetics, emergency medicine, first aid, goodhealth, goodmedicine, mid-thickness burns, natural cures, natural medicine, Naturopathy, remedies, skin damage, skin health, survival medicine
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    (Natural News) First aid guidelines often recommend treating a minor burn by running the affected skin under cold water. But how long do you need to do this to relieve the pain?
    According to research by leading skin specialists, you should run the affected area under running water for at least 20 minutes. The study findings also revealed why the remedy is effective.
    Why 20 minutes?

    The study found that 20 minutes is the optimum time spent under water from a faucet.
    Doing this resulted in a 56 percent reduction in the depth of the burn. This time protocol is longer than what is recommended by some National Health Service (NHS) hospitals, which advice doing so for only 10 minutes.
    Professor Hugh Wright, the studyís lead author who is also a consultant hand surgeon at Leeds General Infirmary, experimented on 30 pieces of tissue donated from patients who had undergone breast reconstruction. (Related: Prepping must-haves: Medical supplies and first aid kits.)
    The breast tissue was burned to the same severity as the skin of a hand touching a gas stove.
    This kind of injury creates ďmid-thickness burnsĒ where the damage penetrates only the upper layer of the skin. It is the most common form of burn.
    Next, the tissue was run under water cooled to 60.8 F (16 C), which is the average temperature of tap water, for 20 minutes. The tissue was also compared with burnt skin that had not been cooled.
    According to Wright, the cooling effect inhibits the bodily process that triggers skin damage after a burn.
    When your skin is injured, the immune system releases cytokines or proteins which protect against infection in the wound. However, when too many cytokines are released in response to a burn, this can trigger prolonged inflammation in the area and increased damage to the tissue as a result.
    Wrightís study, called ďPutting Out The Fire Of The Burn,Ē has found that cooling the wound shuts off the release of cytokines and helps limit tissue damage.
    The study findings suggest that if more injured people run burns under cold water for 20 minutes, there would be fewer severe burns treated on the NHS annually.
    The National Institute For Health and Care Excellence reported that at least 250,000 Britons experience burn injuries every year. An estimated 175,000 patients are hospitalized for treatment.
    The most common type of burn injury is a scald that is caused by hot water or steam.
    Teaching people why itís crucial to cool skin after a burn and how to do it properly can help save many people ďskin grafts, infections and ongoing burns treatment,Ē concluded Wright.
    First aid remedies for minor burns

    You may get a first-degree burn if you accidentally touch a hot stove or curling iron.
    But unlike second- or third-degree burns, which are more severe, first-degree burns only involve the top layer of your skin. If you have a first-degree burn, your skin may be red and painful. The burn can also cause mild swelling.
    You can treat most first-degree burns at home, but you need to treat the burn properly. Even though first-degree burns arenít as serious as higher-degree burns, they can hurt and leave a scar if not properly treated.
    Here are some tips on how to treat a first-degree burn:
    Cool the burn
    As revealed by the study, it is best to immerse the burn in cool tap water for at least 20 minutes or apply cold, wet compresses. Do this until the pain subsides.
    Apply petroleum jelly to the burn two to three times daily
    Only use petroleum jelly on the burn.
    Do not apply ointments, butter or toothpaste because these may cause an infection. Do not apply topical antibiotics.
    Cover the burn with a nonstick, sterile bandage
    If blisters form on the burn, let them heal on their own and keep the area covered. Do not pop the blisters.
    Protect the area from the sun
    After the burn heals, protect the affected area from the sun by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing or applying a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
    These can all help minimize scarring since the redness from a burn sometimes persists for weeks, especially if you have a darker skin tone.
    First-degree burns will usually heal on their own without medical treatment. But if your first-degree burn is very large or the patient is an infant or elderly person, or if you think your burn is more severe, seek medical attention at an emergency room immediately.
    Watch the video below to know more about how biostructured silver can help support the skinís healing process.

    This video is from the Health Ranger Store channel on Brighteon.com.
    More related stories:

    Survival medicine: Healing herbs for your first aid kit.
    First aid basics: Home remedies and treatments for different kinds of open wounds.
    Understanding and treating a second-degree burn.
    Sources include:
    DailyMail.co.uk
    AAD.org
    Brighteon.com

    Treat burns by running affected skin under cold water for at least 20 minutes, advise experts Ė NaturalNews.com
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    Learn how to live without electricity from the Amish community

    Saturday, December 24, 2022 by: Zoey Sky
    Tags: amish, disaster, electricity, food freedom, food supply, green living, homesteading, off grid, power grid, preparedness, prepper, prepping, SHTF, survival, survival gear, survivalist, sustainable living, tips

    4,910VIEWS



    (Natural News) Modern homeowners rely on electricity for many of their gadgets, tools and appliances. If you want to be more self-sufficient, you can learn from the Amish.
    The Amish community can teach preppers many things about being self-sufficient and living independently off the grid.
    Read on to learn how some Amish ways of living can be applied to the typical prepper lifestyle. (h/t to PreppersWill.com)
    Housing

    The Amish keep the cost of the house and outbuilding down by working with their community. A family’s relatives and friends will often camp on the family’s land to help build the new structure.
    When the Amish are building a house, they build the structure, insulate it well and raise it on a site that takes full advantage of the sun and prevailing winds.
    Cooling and heating

    Cooling and heating costs are some of the biggest expenses of many modern American families.
    This is how the Amish save money and stay cool during summer:


    • Most Amish homes are built with a lot of windows to help circulate the air and bring in cooler overnight temperatures. The windows on the top floors are kept open to help the heat escape and the family stays on the lower floors within their homes for comfort.
    • In some Amish homes, families used the basement as a gathering place for dining or playing games.
    • Many Amish houses have a summer kitchen, which is a space connected to or near their house designed for cooking, smoking, pickling or canning during summer. The main purpose of the summer kitchen is to keep the heat and smell of cooking out of your main living quarters.


    The Amish are born and raised without air conditioning and this has helped them become more tolerant of spending time in the summer heat. Many Amish families often wake up early to complete their chores before the sun comes up to avoid the sweltering heat.
    After finishing their chores on hot days, the Amish sometimes take part in summer activities like swimming in nearby ponds or creeks or relaxing under a big tree with friends or books to stay cool even without electricity.
    The Amish keep their homes warm with kerosene heaters, which work like large kerosene lamps.
    A wick made of fiberglass and cotton integrates into a burner unit built above a tank filled with kerosene. The wick absorbs kerosene from the tank.
    Other Amish homes have coal furnaces built into them. These furnaces need lumps of coal thrown into a fire pit to power them.
    The coals stay fire-hot longer than wood and they are a practical space heater.
    Wood stoves

    Wood stoves can be used for both heating and cooking. While wood stoves are banned in some urban and semi-urban environments because they are considered heavy polluters and a fire hazard, many households still have them to help reduce their electricity and gas bills.
    If the local laws allow it, do your research and purchase a quality wood stove and have it installed in your house. Alternatively, you can buy a second-hand one.
    If you are planning on getting a wood stove, make sure you have easy access to a safe source of wood. Ideally, you should have a way to obtain the wood without having to pay for it to save on expenses.
    Lighting

    Modern homes come with electric lighting and it’s one of the big components of newly built houses.
    But if you build your off-grid homestead facing south, you can significantly reduce the need for electric lighting during the day with proper construction and a good alignment. You can also install light tubes or skylight kits that capture the light through a system of mirrors and help bring it inside the home. (Related: 5 Survival lessons we can learn from people who haven’t had power in their homes for hundreds of years.)
    Another option is to use oil lamps. Some of these lamps provide light just as well as regular light bulbs. Some oil lamps are built with mirrors and glass, which provide better light dispersion than older lamps.
    For mobility, use an oil lantern or get a rechargeable solar lamp or flashlight.
    Food production

    As a prepper, living off-grid means becoming self-sufficient and learning how to grow, find or process your own food.
    If you are new to gardening, start by finding out which fruits and vegetables grow in your area. As you gain more experience, you will end up growing more in your garden food than you consume.
    Preserve or sell the surplus of food to earn extra money for other preps. Aside from starting a home garden, you can produce food for your family by raising livestock.
    Many food production tasks can also be accomplished with manual tools. While using electrical equipment is less work, if you want to live without electricity, you can survive with reliable manual tools.
    Refrigeration

    Before refrigeration was invented, people bought dried goods for storage. They also bought fresh produce at the farmer’s market.
    You can build a root cellar to store food and other perishable goods. If you want to preserve food, you can learn how to dry food or how to home-can fruits and vegetables.
    Manual tools

    Many electrical tools and appliances can make your life as a prepper easier, but there are manual alternatives to these tools so you can keep your homestead running even without electricity. These include tools like manual can openers and coffee grinders.
    If you need to take care of chores inside or around the house, get manual drills, saws, rakes or brooms. You should also invest in manual tools that work just as well as electrical appliances and tools.
    Electronics

    If living without electricity is not an option, you can combine the Amish lifestyle and the conveniences of a modern home. For example, you can use manual tools and get a solar power system for important appliances, devices or tools that your family needs. You can also get a cell phone and charge it using a simple solar panel.
    Look at how the Amish live if you want to learn how to survive on your homestead without electricity. If going completely off-grid isn’t ideal for your situation, live a self-sufficient lifestyle on your homestead and use a generator or solar power system only when necessary.
    Watch the video below to learn about the top six survival crops for your home garden.

    This video is from the Deep South Homestead channel on Brighteon.com.
    More related stories:

    Survival essentials: 9 Off-grid appliances for your homestead.
    10 Things that will still work after an electromagnetic pulse attack.
    Emergency preparedness: 10 Ways to heat your home after SHTF.
    Sources include:
    PreppersWill.com
    AmishVillage.com
    AmishFurnitureFactory.com
    Brighteon.com

    Learn how to live without electricity from the Amish community – NaturalNews.com

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