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Thread: BASIC LIST / SUGGESTED ITEMS FOR LONG TERM SURVIVAL

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  1. #791
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
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    Ready Made Resources

    http://www.readymaderesources.com/
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 05:11 AM.
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    Wheat Sales





    Wheat Sales

    WheatSales.com allows you to purchase organic hard red spring wheat berries in bulk or small quantities. WheatSales.com is your one stop shop for hard red spring wheat berries in bulk, 5 gallon pails and packaged in air tight mylar bags. Large quantities are available. Moisture does not exceed 10% and protein averages 12-15%. All of our wheat is packaged in USDA approved bags, buckets and bulk totes.

    Wheatsales sells only Premier Brand Hard Red Spring Wheat, the finest wheat with the highest protein and having excellent long term storage abilities.

    Wheatsales sells Hard Red Spring wheat berries for milling, eating naturally after soaking or for germinating for sprouts, fermenting or for growing in extreme circumstances. Wheat berries sold here are all Hard Red Spring Wheat. Why? Because we are selling the food as a long-term storage resource (it will keep for up to thirty years or more in proper packaging) plus Hard Red Spring Wheat has the highest protein content of any Wheat grain harvested today.

    Wheat is an excellent long-term storage resource for survivalists, families seeking a secure food for long-term storage or for anyone wanting a food easily stored with a high organic protein percentage.

    Wheat sold as flour does not constitute a good long-term food resource. Likewise, white wheat is lower in protein than Hard Red wheat €“ Hard Red Spring Wheat is in fact HIGHER in protein than Hard Red Winter Wheat berries €“ and so we feel it makes the best long term stored food resource anyone can have on hand when and if the need arises.

    All in all, our Hard Red Spring wheat berries are an excellent insurance against food shortages. They store better than rice and many types of beans and have more widely varied uses than any other stored food. They are an absolute must in any survival food storage plan and should form the basis of any long-term food storage.

    NOW SHIPPING WORLDWIDE IN ANY QUANTITY..

    http://www.wheatsales.com/
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    MaxPedition

    Hard Use Gear












    BROWSE BY CATEGORY
    Accessories
    Backpacks
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    Magazine Pouches
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    Other Products

    http://www.maxpedition.com/
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    Ballistic Vests Threat Levels

    http://www.bing.com/shopping/search?q=b ... &FORM=HURE

    Armor Level Protection

    Type I
    (.22 LR; .380 ACP) This armor would protect against 2.6 g (40 gr) .22 Long Rifle Lead Round Nose (LR LRN) bullets at a velocity of 329 m/s (1080 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 6.2 g (95 gr) .380 ACP Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose (FMJ RN) bullets at a velocity of 322 m/s (1055 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It is no longer part of the standard.

    Type IIA
    (9 mm; .40 S&W; .45 ACP) New armor protects against 8 g (124 gr) 9x19mm Parabellum Full Metal Jacketed Round Nose (FMJ RN) bullets at a velocity of 373 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1225 ft/s ± 30 ft/s); 11.7 g (180 gr) .40 S&W Full Metal Jacketed (FMJ) bullets at a velocity of 352 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1155 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 14.9 g (230 gr) .45 ACP Full Metal Jacketed (FMJ) bullets at a velocity of 275 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (900 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). Conditioned armor protects against 8 g (124 gr) 9 mm FMJ RN bullets at a velocity of 355 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1165 ft/s ± 30 ft/s); 11.7 g (180 gr) .40 S&W FMJ bullets at a velocity of 325 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1065 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 14.9 g (230 gr) .45 ACP Full Metal Jacketed (FMJ) bullets at a velocity of 259 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (850 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides protection against the threats mentioned in [Type I].

    Type II
    (9 mm; .357 Magnum) New armor protects against 8 g (124 gr) 9 mm FMJ RN bullets at a velocity of 398 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1305 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 10.2 g (158 gr) .357 Magnum Jacketed Soft Point bullets at a velocity of 436 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1430 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). Conditioned armor protects against 8 g (124 gr) 9 mm FMJ RN bullets at a velocity of 379 m/s ±9.1 m/s (1245 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 10.2 g (158 gr) .357 Magnum Jacketed Soft Point bullets at a velocity of 408 m/s ±9.1 m/s (1340 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides protection against the threats mentioned in [Types I and IIA].

    Type IIIA
    (.357 SIG; .44 Magnum) New armor protects against 8.1 g (125 gr) .357 SIG FMJ Flat Nose (FN) bullets at a velocity of 448 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1470 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 15.6 g (240 gr) .44 Magnum Semi Jacketed Hollow Point (SJHP) bullets at a velocity of 436 m/s (1430 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). Conditioned armor protects against 8.1 g (125 gr) .357 SIG FMJ Flat Nose (FN) bullets at a velocity of 430 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1410 ft/s ± 30 ft/s) and 15.6 g (240 gr) .44 Magnum Semi Jacketed Hollow Point (SJHP) bullets at a velocity of 408 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (1340 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides protection against most handgun threats, as well as the threats mentioned in [Types I, IIA, and II].

    Type III
    (Rifles) Conditioned armor protects against 9.6 g (148 gr) 7.62x51mm NATO M80 ball bullets at a velocity of 847 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (2780 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides protection against the threats mentioned in [Types I, IIA, II, and IIIA].

    Type IV
    (Armor Piercing Rifle) Conditioned armor protects against 10.8 g (166 gr) .30-06 Springfield M2 armor-piercing (AP) bullets at a velocity of 878 m/s ± 9.1 m/s (2880 ft/s ± 30 ft/s). It also provides at least single hit protection against the threats mentioned in [Types I, IIA, II, IIIA, and III].

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballistic_vest

    NO Armor is 100% Bullet-PROOF

    A 'bulletproof' vest or other armor will protect you from the vast majority of pistol ballistic threats you are ever likely to face. But there is always a tradeoff between more protection and more wearability (and the constraint to stay within your budget). Please know that:

    rifle rounds
    unusual high velocity pistol ammunition
    pistol ammo fired from a rifle barrel
    armor piercing ammunition
    sharp-edged or pointed instruments (e.g., knives, icepicks, etc.), and/or
    other unusual ammunition or situations...

    CAN defeat body armor.
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-29-2012 at 06:55 PM.
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  5. #795
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    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-29-2012 at 06:55 PM.
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    Have your herbs and take them too - Make your own tinctures

    Friday, May 06, 2011 by: Paul Fassa
    See all articles by this author
    Email this author

    (NaturalNews) The effort to restrict supplements has begun in a failing economy. One has to be creative to offset or avoid these increasing efforts to deprive us of supplements and natural medicines. One solution is to make and store our own herbal tinctures and extracts. It's actually quite easy.

    If herbs become too difficult to purchase, it doesn't take much soil to grow your own.

    Tincture Extract Advantages

    The initial investment involves buying one or more large jars and one or two ounce dropper bottles.
    Then you can buy a pound of herbs on line for the same price as a one ounce tincture off the shelf. Just make sure you select herbs that are organic and not irradiated.

    Preparing teas and decoctions are daily or almost daily enterprises. A tincture will last for a much, much longer time. Once the tincture is ready, you can tap into it daily with a dropper full or two. Enjoying the herbal wonders daily for a year or so after a twenty to thirty dollar investment means you can enjoy the benefits of herbal extracts for pennies a day.

    A Basic Formula

    One recipe uses vodka, which is a combination of pure water (hopefully) and ethyl alcohol (aka, methanol and grain alcohol, the type that is drinkable). The alcohol that can kill with a couple of sips is isopropyl or rubbing alcohol.

    If you want to ensure purity, you can buy grain alcohol and distilled water separately then mix them. The word "proof" alongside a number indicates twice the percentage of alcohol. In other words, 80 proof vodka is 40% alcohol with 60% water, which many consider the ideal ratio for tinctures.

    Others prefer 50/50, which means the vodka needs to be 100 proof. Pure grain alcohol is 200 proof. A little of that in a punch bowl goes a long way! So you can use the most common ratio of 60% water by volume with 40% methanol (ethyl alcohol), or simply go 50/50 with the two liquids.

    Use a large glass jar with a screw on cap, like a mason jar. Pour in the dried herbs up to one-third or almost half the container. The bulkier the herbs, the more should go into the jar. Then take your vodka or alcohol/water solution and pour it to almost the top, allowing some space to swoosh the solution by gently shaking the capped jar.

    Though many say two weeks seasoning is sufficient, this author was instructed by a naturopath/herbalist to season for 30 days. Either way, the jar should season in a cool, dark space and be shaken gently each day during its seasoning cycle. After seasoning, you can filter out the herbs and put the liquid into another glass container, or simply leave it and siphon off a bit at a time.

    You can use one or two ounce glass bottles with glass eyedroppers for taking the tincture. This way the mother jar can be kept off to the side in a dark space, with or without the herbs. One or two full droppers full daily are recommended for most. It usually takes two dropper squeezes to make one full dropper since it's impossible to get a full dropper full in one draw. You can simply squirt it directly into your mouth or under your tongue, or mix it with water or tea.

    Those, who need to avoid alcohol completely, should place the tincture into a cup of hot water and let is sit until cool enough to drink. This helps evaporate some of the alcohol content away.

    Sources for this article include:

    http://www.unhinderedliving.com/hom...

    http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...

    http://www.erowid.org/plants/salvia...



    About the author
    Paul Fassa is dedicated to warning others about the current corruption of food and medicine and guiding others toward a direction for better health with no restrictions on health freedom. You can visit his blog at http://healthmaven.blogspot.com

    http://www.naturalnews.com/032298_herbs_tinctures.html




    Kathyet

  7. #797
    Senior Member AirborneSapper7's Avatar
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    Beer Brewing for Beginners

    Whether this is your first fermentation or a continuation of the quest to create the perfect glass of beer, here are the fundamentals of brewing.



    Beer brewing can be as complex or simple as you wish to make it. There are beer brewing kits available for purchase that simplify brewing--and then there is the art of brewing from scratch.

    The Key Ingredients

    Before beginning the brewing process, you must first understand the four key ingredients necessary to brew a batch of beer: water, fermentable sugar, hops, and yeast. Each ingredient is integral to the recipe and must be cooked in a certain way to yield a successful batch of brew. Understanding their basic qualities and how each ingredient is meant to react with the others is an important aspect of beer brewing.

    Water: Water is the primary ingredient in beer, so it is very important the water tastes good. If the tap water at your house tastes good to you, then it is fine to use for beer brewing. If you don't like the way your tap water tastes, then you can use bottled or distilled water instead. If you use tap water, boil it first to evaporate the chlorine and other chemicals that may interfere with the brewing process. Let the water cool before using.

    Fermented Sugar: Malted barley is the ingredient commonly used to fill the sugar quota in a home brew recipe. Some brewers will substitute a percentage of corn, rice, wheat, or other grains to add a lighter flavor to the beer. Beginning brewers should purchase a ready-to-use form of malted barley called malt syrup or malt extract, rather than attempting to malt the grain from scratch, as it is a very complex and touchy process. Using a malt extract will guarantee the fermented sugar is prepared in just the right manner and will act as it needs to throughout the beer brewing process.

    Hops: Hops are cone-like flowers found on a hop vine. They lend the bitter flavor to beer that balances out sweetness. Hops also inhibit spoilage and help keep the "head" (the frothy top when a beer is poured) around longer.

    Yeast: First things first: Do not use bread yeast for beer brewing! Beer yeast is cultivated especially for use in brewing. There are two broad categories of beer yeast: ale and lager. Ale yeasts are top-fermenting, which means they tend to hang out at the top of the carboy while fermenting and rest at the bottom after the majority of fermenting has occurred. Ale yeasts will not actively ferment below 50 degrees F (20 degrees C). Lager yeasts are bottom-fermenters and are best used at a temperature ranging from 55 degrees F (25 degrees C) down to 32 degrees F (0 degrees C). As their names suggest, the type of yeast used plays an important part in influencing the type of beer that will be made. Do not rely on the yeast to define the beer, however, as all of the ingredients play a part in the taste and type of beer you will create.

    Ready to Brew?

    We've opted to use a simple ale recipe to guide you through the process. The first cooking step in brewing is to make the wort, a soupy mixture of malt and sugar that is boiled before fermentation. Malt and sugar form the perfect food for yeast to grown in--thus making the all-important process of fermentation possible. All of the ingredients for beer-making can be found at your local brew supply store, or at any number of beer outfitters. Once you've got all the necessary equipment and ingredients, you're ready to begin the beer-making process by properly sanitizing your equipment, making and cooling the wort, fermenting the wort, and bottling your brew.

    Ingredients:

    1.5 gallons water
    6 pounds canned pre-hopped light malt syrup
    1 ounce hop pellets (choose your flavor)
    Ice poured into a water bath (do not use store-bought ice)
    3 gallons cool water
    2 (7-gram) packets ale yeast
    1 cup warm water (about 90 degrees F or 35 degrees C)
    3/4 cup liquid corn syrup (or 4 ounces dry corn syrup)
    1 (4-ounce) container iodine solution
    1 tablespoon bleach

    A bottle of household bleach or an iodine solution that can be bought at your local home brew shop to sanitize all of your materials or use will be necessary. (Make a bleach disinfecting solution with 1 tablespoon bleach to 1 gallon water.) Be sure to rinse the equipment well with boiling water before using it.

    Beer Brewing Equipment http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/Beer-Brewin ... etail.aspx

    Part I: Make and Cool the Wort

    Sanitize the pot, stirring spoon and fermenter with the sanitizing solution. Rinse everything in boiling water.

    Bring 1.5 gallons of water to a boil. When the water begins to boil, remove it from the heat and stir in the malt syrup until it dissolves. Do not allow any syrup to stick to the bottom or sides of the pot, as it will burn and taste awful. Return the pot to the heat and bring the mixture to a boil for 50 minutes, stir frequently and watch constantly to prevent boil-overs. If the mixture threatens to boil over, reduce the heat.

    After 50 minutes have elapsed, stir in the hop pellets. Hops will create a foam on the top of the liquid--so if the pot is very full, the hops may cause a boil-over. You want to avoid this at all costs by lowering the heat or spraying the foam down with a water bottle (sanitized, of course). Let the hops cook for 10 to 20 minutes.

    While the wort is being made, prep the yeast by placing 1 packet of yeast in 1 cup of warm water (90 degrees F or 35 degrees C; stir and cover for 10 minutes. If the yeast does not react (form foam), discard the yeast solution and try again with the second yeast packet.

    At about the time hops are added to the wort, you should prepare an ice-cold water bath in either a large sink or tub to quick-cool the wort. Once the wort is finished cooking, float the pot in the water bath. Stir the wort while it is sitting in the bath so that the maximum amount of wort reaches the pot's sides where it can cool quickly. If the water bath heats up, add more ice to keep the water bath cold. It should take approximately 20 minutes to cool the wort to approximately 80 degrees F (27 degrees C).

    Part II: Ferment

    Pour the 3 gallons cool water into your sanitized carboy. Funnel in the warm wort. Sprinkle the prepared yeast into the carboy. Cover the carboy's mouth with plastic wrap and cap it with a lid. Holding your hand tight over the lid, shake the bottle up and down to distribute the yeast. Remove the plastic wrap, wipe any wort around the carboy's mouth off and place the fermentation lock (with a little water added into its top) on.
    Store the carboy in a cool (60 to 75 degrees F or 15 to 24 degrees C) safe place without direct sunlight where you will be able to easily clean up or drain any foam that escapes. A bathtub is an excellent place to store your fermenter if there are no windows in the room. If the temperature in the storage room drops and bubbling in the carboy's airlock stops, move the carboy to a warmer room. The fermenting will resume. Fermentation should begin within 24 hours. A clear sign of fermentation is the production of foam and air bubbles in the fermentation lock.

    When fermentation begins, it produces a slow trickle of bubbles that will increase in amount for a few days, and then reduce to a slow trickle again. Let the beer ferment for approximately 14 days when the primary fermentation has taken place. If the fermenting process pops the fermentation lock out of the carboy, re-sanitize it and place it back into the carboy.

    Part III: Bottle

    Sanitize all of your bottles by soaking them in the sanitizing solution (make sure to hold them under the solution so the water gets inside of the bottles) for 1 hour. Rinse the bottles with boiling water. Also sanitize a small cooking pot, bottling bucket, siphon and racking cane. Follow the instructions that came with the bottle caps to sanitize them. Let everything air dry.

    Combine the corn syrup and 1 cup water in the sanitized cooking pot. Let boil 10 minutes. Pour mixture into the bottling bucket. Be careful not to add too much corn syrup to the bottling bucket, because this will over-carbonate the beer and cause bottles to explode! Place the fermenter full of beer on the kitchen counter and the bottling bucket on the ground below it.

    Attach the racking cane to the siphon. Prepare the siphon by filling it with tap water. Pinch both ends of the siphon to prevent the water from running out. Place one end of the racking cane and siphon into the iodine solution and one end into an empty jar. When the solution has run into the siphon and expelled all of the water into the jar, pinch both ends and let the iodine sit in the siphon for 5 minutes to re-sanitize the siphon. (Resist the temptation to blow into the siphon with your mouth to encourage the flow of iodine solution.)

    Place one end of the sanitized siphon into the fermenter and the other end into the jar; once the beer has begun flowing through the siphon, transfer its end to the bottling bucket. Monitor the speed that the beer transfers into the bottling bucket by pinching and releasing the siphon with your fingers (or use a specialty clamp). The beer should not splash into the bucket; it should gently rush into it. Once all of the beer has been siphoned into the bucket, cover it (with a sanitized cover ) and wait 30 minutes for the sediment to settle at the bottom of the bucket.
    Place the bottling bucket on the counter, attach the siphon and run the other end of the siphon into a bottle. Fill each bottle with beer to 3/4 inch from the top of the bottle. Cap each bottle with the bottle-capper. Check and double-check that the caps are secure.

    Sure Signs of Infection:

    Keep your eyes peeled for strands of slime in the beer and a milky layer at the top and/or residue bumps clinging to the air space in the bottleneck. If the beer has strands, it most likely has a lacto infection and should be discarded. The milky layer is a sign of a micro-derm infection; this beer should also be discarded.

    Age the bottles at room temperature for up to two months, but for at least two weeks, before cracking one open, proposing a toast to yourself and impressing your friends! Ready to expand your brewing prowess? Try these recipes:



    € Irish Chocolate Stout http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Irish-Choc ... etail.aspx

    http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/beer-brewin ... etail.aspx
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 05:15 AM.
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  8. #798
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    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 05:16 AM.
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    Beginner's Luck Brown Ale



    Ingredients:

    4 lb malt extract syrup
    6 oz crystal malt
    1.5 oz black malt
    2 oz roasted barley
    1 oz flaked or rolled barley
    1 oz wheat malt
    2 oz Northern Brewer hops
    1 oz Goldings hops
    28 oz dark brown sugar
    2 oz lactose
    ale yeast

    Procedure:

    Hops: these are two of the six or so types available here in the UK; I'm afraid I don't know what the US equivalents would be because I've been brewing only since my transplantation from the States in early '92. [If anyone knows a reasonable set of hops equivalencies, I`m all ears.] Northern Brewer is a very sharp hop that is a prime-requisite for British dark beers and stouts (and some pale ales); Goldings is a much "rounder" hop that is a prominent component of southern-English bitters. US brewers use yer best guesses, I guess. Procedure: I treat my water with 0.25 tsp salt per gallon to adjust pH; the water here (Bristol, in the SW) is fairly soft by UK standards but contains some dissolved CaCO3. I have had no difficulties whatever using tap water. I dissolve the malt extract and then boil the adjunct grains + hops in it for about an hour. I then strain a couple of kettlesful (kettlefuls?) of hot water into the primary through the spent grains and hops to rinse them. I dissolve the sugar in a couple of pints of warm water and add this to the wort, then top up with cold water to 5 gallons. When the wort is cool, I then measure OG (usually about 1035 to 1039), then add the lactose and pitch the (top-fermenting) yeast. The lactose gives just a hint of residual sweetness in the final brew; if that's not to your taste, omit it. This brew ferments to quarter-gravity stage in about 3 days when temperatures are about 20C (70F) and in about 5 days when temps are about 10C (mid-40s F). Final gravity is usually about 1005, resulting in ABV's of 4.5 to 5%. I prime my secondary fermentation vessel with about 1 tsp of dark brown sugar, and usually let it sit in the secondary 7 to 10 days, adding finings after the first 48 hours or so. I have not tried dry-hopping this recipe. I prime my bottles with 1/2 tsp of brewer's glucose; maturation is sufficiently complete in about 10 days, but obviously the longer the better.

    http://beerrecipes.blogspot.com/2009/06 ... n-ale.html
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 05:17 AM.
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  10. #800
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    Beer Recipes and Resources for Homebrewers

    Homebrew Links

    We have a great list of homebrew related Links to help you find what you are looking for. http://beerrecipes.org/links.php

    Beer Recipes

    There are currently 1156 Recipes in our database and growing. http://beerrecipes.org/findrecipe.php

    http://beerrecipes.org/
    Last edited by AirborneSapper7; 01-30-2012 at 05:18 AM.
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