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  1. #31

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    How about this one. Jenny Garcia was murdered and it wouldn't have happened if our country had listened to Tancredo's plea against "sanctuary cities" like Austin, TX. I found it interesting that not only did the police conceal or not know the murderer's prior record but the news reporter didn't ask either. The question of Morales' illegal alien status simply didn't come up.

    Quote Originally Posted by Antonio Castelan, News8Austin, Jan 27, 2004
    Man charged with Monday night's murder
    On Monday two girls found their older sister -- a freshman at St. Edward’s University -- stabbed to death inside the family's Northwest Austin home. Detectives later connected a man to the capital murder after he placed a call to APD's Homicide Tip Line. People living at the Champion Forests subdivision in Northwest Austin are still in shock over the death of 18-year-old Virginia Garcia. The victim's neighbors are relieved a suspect is behind bars.

    People describe the Champion's Forest subdivision in Northwest Austin as a quiet neighborhood. A Monday night murder disrupted the community. Police said Garcia -- better known as "Jenny" -- was stabbed to death by 20-year old David Diaz Morales inside her home. Police charged Morales with her murder. Detectives believe he was infatuated with the St. Edward's University freshman. Police said Morales broke into the home and stabbed Garcia.

    "We believe they did know each other. They had worked together some months back and they had mutual friends. It also appears that David Diaz had feelings for Jenny Garcia," Lt. Charles Black, with robbery & homicide, said. Investigators believe Morales burglarized the home at around 2 p.m. Monday. Garcia's younger sisters found her dead around 6 p.m. at their home on the 4700 block of Whispering Valley. Investigators said Morales called the APD tip line posing as a concerned friend saying that he noticed the house. Police traced the call and went to David Diaz Morales's apartment.

    "The person identified himself as David Diaz. He said he was watching the news, and that he had recognized Jenny Garcia's address, and he wanted to know what was going on," Black said. After police questioned him some more he hung up. Detectives traced the line, and said they found stolen jewelry from the victim's house. "He agreed to come to the police station and did answer questions and offered explanations for his whereabouts and explanations for their relationship. But as they continued to investigate further, then we found that jewelry that had been stolen from Virginia Garcia's home was inside the apartment of David Diaz [Morales]," Black said.

    Garcia's neighbors are glad police made an arrest. "That is reassuring and we'll probably make people in the neighborhood much more secure," neighbor Belinn Higginbotham said. Police charged Morales with capital murder. He's in jail without bond. St. Edwards University has planned a memorial mass. The service starts at noon Thursday in the Our Lady Queen of Peace Chapel. St. Edwards is also offering grief counseling for students.

    The university asks anyone who would like to send condolences to Garcia's family, to do so in care of Sister Ann Francis Monedero, assistant director of Campus Ministry, Campus Mailbox 1023, St. Edward's University, 3001 South Congress Avenue, Austin, TX 78704. David Murders Jenny
    The solution Mr. Garcia offers is one many of us, myself included, had not considered realistic. Sue the city. Here's what's going on today.

    [quote="ImmigrationsHumanCost.org"]Virginia "Jenny" Garcia was an 18-year-old college freshman when she was murdered with a butcher knife in her own house, in her own room, on her own bed allegedly by an illegal alien. The accused murderer, David Diaz Morales, whom the Austin police had earlier held in custody for child molestation, had been released rather than deported because of the city's sanctuary policy.

    Incidentally, Rep. Tom Tancredo tried to end the criminal-protection sanctuary policy in 2003, but Congress was deaf to the concerns of victims' families and law enforcement generally: the bill received only 104 votes out of 424 cast. So much for the "nation of laws" myth we hear celebrated by politicians when they are campaigning for re-election. When push comes to shove, most choose political correctness â€
    '58 Airedale

  2. #32

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    Or how about this one.

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd J. Gillman, Dallas Morning News, Apr 2
    Local taxpayers stuck with bill to jail immigrants
    Plan to eliminate federal aid program angers states, counties

    OLMITO, Texas – One in three prisoners at the Cameron County Jail entered the country illegally. Many will stay three or four months awaiting trial for burglary, assault, drunken driving or some other crime. Taxpayers here pay $36 per day to feed, clothe and guard each of these suspects. That's $460,000 per year – a fortune to the nation's poorest county. By law, the federal government should cover the cost of jailing people who slip through the border and then commit a crime. In reality, Washington has never spent more than a fraction of the costs.

    And for the fourth year in a row, President Bush is trying to eliminate the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program, arguing that tighter border controls will eventually minimize the local burden. At a time of tight budgets, he says it's one of 150 programs the nation simply can't afford. At his office in Olmito, Sheriff Omar Lucio sees an administration trying to balance the federal budget on the backs of the poor. "Somebody's got to foot the bill. Nothing's free," he said in his office outside Brownsville. "Can you imagine what you can do with $36 a day? ... How about better roads? Better health care for the indigent and the old people?" At the impoverished southern tip of Texas – where colonias like Cameron Park lack running water, pavement and street lights – schools need replacing and residents need job training.

    "I don't know how they think we're going to pay for it," said the Rev. Michael Seifert, pastor at the San Felipe de Jesus Catholic Church, a few miles from the jail. "To say that we're needy, that's not even coming close to exaggeration," he said. "Do not get sick and live in the border counties. You will not get help. We rank right with Honduras in terms of dental care, if you don't have insurance." The county can't find money to operate a Boys & Girls club to keep kids out of trouble. A soccer field and recreation center is unstaffed, and with half of Cameron Park's population younger than 21, that's a problem. "The officials do all the fancy juggling they can, but in the end you can only go so far," Father Seifert said. "If you have to pay for the jail, the kids aren't going to have a park."

    Funding shortfalls

    Texas and more than 90 of its counties have collected more than $350 million under the Criminal Alien Assistance Program, created in 1995 on the grounds that keeping out illegal immigrants is a federal responsibility, so paying to jail them if they commit a crime is, too. Five years ago, the state got $59 million. Last year, it was about $25 million – a third of what it cost to detain 8,700 eligible inmates in state prisons and county jails. Gov. Rick Perry calls funding a top priority. He's co-signed letters to key lawmakers with the president's brother Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and governors in New York, California, Nevada and Arizona. After turning back Mr. Bush's last effort to ax the program, Congress carved out $305 million in this year's budget. That covers about a quarter of state and local costs, and it's about half the outlay five years ago.

    "It's just a scandal, really," said Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas. "I'm all for the federal government living within its means, and I support this budget. But I think part of budgeting is ... making sure you fund your priorities." At the White House Office of Management, communications director Noam Neusner said the program should be cut because it hasn't curtailed crime or the flow of illegal border crossings. "The challenge with SCAAP is that it may have very good intentions, but it simply does not demonstrate the results that we would like to see," he said. So, Mr. Neusner added, "we're focusing scarce taxpayer resources" on efforts more likely to yield long-term results, such as border patrols, drug interdiction and worksite enforcement of immigration laws. "All these efforts have seen major increases since 2001, and we believe these will be more effective in helping border states." But many lawmakers say the administration has shortchanged border enforcement, and that either way, the program should be expanded, not scrapped.

    Fighting for money

    The U.S. Mexico Border Coalition – 24 counties from Brownsville to San Diego – is fighting hard for funding, as is the Congressional Border Caucus, led by U.S. Reps. Solomon Ortiz, D-Corpus Christi, and Henry Bonilla, R-San Antonio. Sens. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., are pushing for $750 million next year, rising to $950 million a year after 2008. Last Thursday, the Senate overwhelmingly approved a nonbinding resolution from Ms. Feinstein to put $750 million in next year's budget. But the House has yet to make any commitment. And that would only be enough to cover the full costs in one state, California, where one in 10 inmates entered the country illegally. Last year, Los Angeles County alone spent $100 million on such inmates and got back $14 million.

    Earlier this month, Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano, a Democrat, sent the U.S. attorney general a bill for $118 million to cover the last year and a half. "Hope springs eternal," she said. "We're housing 4,000 illegal aliens who've committed crimes in Arizona. We're supposed to be paid the cost of those individuals, or at least have the feds take custody of them. So I sent him an invoice." Some border-state officials grumble that Mr. Bush used to be on their side. In 1995, as a candidate for governor, he vowed to press ahead with a lawsuit brought by the state's Democratic attorney general, Dan Morales, seeking $1.34 billion from Washington to jail and educate illegal immigrants. "It's not fair to the taxpayers of Texas to stick them with the bill when the government fails to enforce immigration laws," Bush adviser and spokeswoman Karen Hughes told reporters at the time.

    He reiterated that stance in Sept. 1999 as a presidential candidate. Now, some lawmakers say, Mr. Bush is playing a time-honored budget game, knowing that support is too broad for the program to die. Aides deny that. "Cut funding for those programs you know Congress will restore, and your budget looks good," said Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. But he added, "It's a clear federal responsibility."

    'There's huge needs'

    Nathan Selzer of Proyecto Libertad, an immigrant advocacy group in the Valley, called it unfortunate that U.S. law criminalizes the "victimless, nonviolent" act of crossing a border to find work. But because changes to the immigration policy won't happen overnight, he said, forcing local taxpayers to shoulder the burden isn't fair, either. He cited education, job training, a shortage of rural ambulance service and a "tremendous neglect of the infrastructure." "Our community is one of the poorest communities in the United States. There's huge needs," he said. At the Cameron County jail, Sheriff Lucio had 576 inmates at last count.

    Two years ago the Justice Department made it harder for counties to collect on these inmates. Previously, jails could seek repayment for every day behind bars. Under the new rules, eligibility kicks in only after conviction on a felony or two misdemeanors. So if someone is charged with a single misdemeanor, or plea-bargains a felony to a misdemeanor, the county gets nothing. These scenarios are common, the sheriff said, and it's doubly frustrating. Because within hours of booking, the Border Patrol checks on each suspect and a notation goes into the file of any illegal immigrant. Bail isn't allowed, even on the sort of minor charge for which an American citizen might be freed after a day or two. "We deserve to get paid for anyone who's brought here, even if it's one misdemeanor," Sheriff Lucio said. "Aren't they the ones supposed to be stopping all these illegal aliens from coming here? Once they come out here, they become everybody's problem." Criminal Costs
    E-mail tgillman@dallasnews.com
    It's not only the local governments that are outraged. Here's a taste of what the people say.

    Quote Originally Posted by David Hoare, Carrollton, TX, Letter to Dallas Morning News, Apr 2
    Illegals are the problem
    Re: "Aliens pay taxes, too," by Roy Martinez, Wednesday Letters.
    Mr. Martinez says illegal aliens also pay their fair share of taxes. What about the cost for delivery of each immigrant baby or the cost of educating each immigrant child? What about the cost for Spanish-only classes because they will not learn English? However, you are right that government is also the problem, even though most people would like someone to stop the tide of illegal immigration. Illegals Pay?
    '58 Airedale

  3. #33

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    Here's another.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Trahan & Scott Parks, Dallas Morning News, Jan 28
    Police find body of missing restaurateur
    Officials say he was shot trying to escape

    Dallas restaurateur Oscar Sanchez was shot as he was trying to escape hours after kidnappers snatched him from an Oak Cliff street 10 days ago, police told his family Thursday. The grim news came as searchers found Mr. Sanchez's body in a cold, rain-soaked field in South Dallas. His remains were covered with construction debris. "From what we know, it appears that Oscar was killed only a few hours after his abduction ... in an attempt to escape his captors," said Mike McKinley, attorney for the Sanchez family. "We received confirmation from the Dallas Police Department that the body found earlier today in a remote part of Dallas County was indeed the body of Oscar Sanchez," Mr. McKinley said. "Obviously, this is a time of profound sadness for the family and friends of Oscar Sanchez."

    Jose Alberto Felix, 28, a former Dallas schoolteacher, was arrested Sunday in Chicago in connection with Mr. Sanchez's disappearance. He is now in the Dallas County jail. His bail had been set at $500,000 but was raised to $1 million Thursday. Edgar "Richie" Acevedo, 24, is believed to be a fugitive in Mexico.

    The discovery of Mr. Sanchez's remains solved the mystery of his whereabouts but shed no light on why he was targeted for kidnapping. His family and their spokesman said it was all about money. Mr. Acevedo had been a waiter at the popular El Ranchito restaurant on Jefferson Boulevard in Oak Cliff. Mr. Sanchez and his family own the restaurant and often held business meetings there. The family also owns La Calle Doce restaurants in Oak Cliff and Lakewood. "Since many of these meetings were held over lunch or dinner at the restaurant, the family believes it is likely that Richie Acevedo and/or others may have overheard parts of these conversations and, together with the fact that the Sanchez family operated a successful and high-profile business for a number of years, derived at their conclusion that they could extort money from the family by kidnapping a family member" Mr. McKinley said.

    Unwitting accomplice?

    John Hampton Read, Mr. Felix's attorney, on Thursday declined to say if his client had been involved in the kidnapping. But if he was involved, Mr. Read added, he was unwittingly swept into the abduction. He portrayed Mr. Acevedo as the kidnapping mastermind.
    Relatives and acquaintances of Mr. Acevedo say he often dressed as a woman and adopted the name Pamela. Mr. Read said he believes Mr. Acevedo's changing sexual identity may have played a role in the abduction and death of Mr. Sanchez.

    "I'm inclined to believe that threw him over the edge," Mr. Read said. "He was becoming more and more aggressive." Mr. Read declined to talk about the kidnapping or say what role, if any, his client played in it. He said Mr. Felix felt threatened by Mr. Acevedo and may have cooperated with him out of fear for his life. "The bad guy of this thing, of this deal, is Edgar," Mr. Read said. "My client is scared of Edgar. Edgar placed him into a position of peril." Mr. Read said Mr. Acevedo and Mr. Felix met three or four years ago at a bar and remained close friends and roommates but were never intimately involved. He said Mr. Felix had recently broken up with a man who works in computer information for a hotel chain because Mr. Felix planned to return to Mexico to continue his studies.

    Mr. Read said Mr. Felix owns the Duncanville home where Mr. Sanchez was shot and killed. Earlier that day, Mr. Sanchez had been abducted when a white sedan rammed the back of his black Honda Civic a few blocks from his Oak Cliff home. The incident appeared to be a staged fender-bender, police said. Mr. McKinley said it appeared that the kidnappers had been keeping Mr. Sanchez under surveillance for several weeks before the kidnapping. Mr. Sanchez lived in the upscale Kessler Stevens Park area of Oak Cliff with his wife and daughter. Kidnappers contacted the family repeatedly with ransom demands on the day of the abduction. Police said the kidnappers first wanted $3 million but gradually dropped their demand to $78,000 when the family insisted they could only come up with that much cash.

    The family and the kidnappers arranged for the money to be dropped in Arlington, but no one showed up to claim the cash, police said. Mr. Acevedo and Mr. Felix apparently fled to Chicago and stayed with a relative. Mr. Acevedo apparently made it to Mexico. Mr. Felix was arrested at a Chicago airport shortly before he was to board a flight to Guadalajara.

    An end to the search

    The discovery of Mr. Sanchez's body closed a four-day search, which ended in a heavily wooded area near Hutchins and just south of Interstate 20. Police said they were able to narrow the search area and find Mr. Sanchez based on information provided by Mr. Felix. Crews on horseback, on foot, in a helicopter and guided by highly trained dogs combed the rural area for 3 ½ days. On Tuesday, boats were used to inspect the Trinity River for clues. About 11 a.m. Thursday, a Dallas police officer spotted a portion of Mr. Sanchez's body partially buried under construction debris about 50 feet off Cleveland Road just northwest of the Cedardale Drive intersection.

    "Back in the area, there was cardboard, what looked like roofing shingles, there was trash back there," said Lt. Jan Easterling, a Dallas police spokeswoman. "You couldn't see it from the road. You had to walk back in there. There were signs where people had been backing in and dumping stuff in there. The way it was, somebody else could have dumped there the last two days and not seen it." Friends of Mr. Sanchez's gathered in the cold drizzle, near where a Dallas police cruiser blocked Cleveland at Cedardale. They hugged one another and spoke to police. Larry Jenkins, a volunteer searcher, was among those present when the body was found. "Mr. Sanchez is back there," he said. "It's a sad day for Dallas."

    Suspect's family speaks

    Jose Alberto Felix Sr., Mr. Felix's father, flew from Mexico to Dallas with two of his daughters this week after a Dallas homicide detective notified him that his son faced kidnapping charges. In an interview Thursday afternoon, the elder Mr. Felix and his daughters said they were stunned by the accusation. They said Mr. Felix is a caring, well-mannered and hard-working man. "We're feeling consternation," said Karla Felix, 30, who lives in Sydney, Australia. "We feel impotent, as we have no information about what's going on." Mr. Felix was born in Choix, a small town in the state of Sinaloa in Mexico. He was the third of four children, the only male. He went to law school in the city of Leon, in the state of Guanajuato, where he obtained a law degree sometime in 2000 and graduated with honors, relatives said.

    Mr. Felix traveled to Dallas shortly after graduating from law school for what he originally anticipated would be a short stay during which he planned to polish his English. A few months after his arrival, he learned that the Dallas Independent School District was in dire need of Spanish-speaking teachers, and he applied for a job. He was offered a position at Fannin Elementary School in East Dallas, where he worked for roughly a year and a half. Mr. Felix's relatives said that they knew he had recently purchased a house in Duncanville but that they knew little about his personal life.

    One of his sisters said she briefly met Mr. Acevedo, the other suspect in the case, but had no idea that their friendship could wind up being destructive. Mr. Felix traveled home to Mexico in November to run an errand at the American consulate and explained to relatives that he would be unable to join them for Christmas. They last spoke to him over the phone in early January. They described the conversation as mundane. While proclaiming his son's innocence, the elder Mr. Felix also extended his condolences to the Sanchez family Thursday. "Please tell the Sanchez family that if my son had anything to do with this, we ask for forgiveness." Murder in Dallas
    E-mail jtrahan@dallasnews.com
    '58 Airedale

  4. #34
    mercier's Avatar
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    im sick of this...

    after the last few posts, i have decided...

    i am going out and get drunk.

    hopefully in a f few hours i will be lying face down in a puddle of puke.

    mercier
    no fear no compromise

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueHills
    Perhaps Emiliano could state directly and publicly what he believes our position on illegal alien policy should be (and what his is too for that matter) and what attitude he has towards those who oppose illegal immigration -- just to clear things up.

    Other than that, I'm out of this. Seems like a waste of time playing games.
    Actually BlueHills made the first comment on this entire forum that is NOT a waste of time; no, not asking me what MY opinions are because quite frankly my opinions don't mean much. But BlueHills brings up the question of what our illegal alien policy should be.

    First of all, the facts: YOU WILL NEVER GET RID OF ALL OF THEM!!!!!! NEVER!!!!!!! And you're fooling yourself if you think you can stop all the new ones who want to come in. If you want to deport the illegals, then you would first have to identify them which you can't (without tattoing 666 on every legal person's forehead or wrist). But even if all illegals could be identified easily, the costs of deporting them would be astronomical and would surely exceed the benefits (if any) of deporting them. Finally, if they were all deported then the adverse effects to this nation's economy would be severe.

    Now think about this. Rip me to shreds with your personal insults, and I'll come back tomorrow to present Dr. Bhagwati's ideas about what policy should be.

  6. #36
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    OK, I have seen enough. Emiliano has finally shown himself CLEARLY to be a OBL. Took him (her/it?) long enough to come clean, and take a stand on where his position is, rather than playing childish, and boring, little games.

    I suggest nobody rising to this worm's bait. I am leaving this thread unlocked FOR THE MOMENT, but will not hesitate to lock it if it start getting out of hand. WATCH YOUR RESPONSES.

    I am recommending this little agent provocatuer be banished to the DU nether regions, but an Admin will have to deal with that.

  7. #37
    Administrator ALIPAC's Avatar
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    Emiliano:

    We do not need to deport every single illegal alien. The first thing we need to do is cut off the flow into the nation. Then we can greatly reduce the number of illegal aliens in the US through limited deportation and auto deportation.

    Many illegal aliens will leave if we set up the right policy enforcement. Many illegal aliens already leave each year, it is just that more are staying after they come than are leaving.

    If we secure your border, cut off welfare and benefits illegal aliens receive, crack down on employers, and deport illegals when detected by law enforcement then this crisis will start to turn around.

    I also think we need stronger measures for those that are deported that return. If we take down their fingerprints we can know when they are caught in the US again and the rule should be that if you are caught in the US illegally even just once then you are prohibited by law from EVER becoming a LEGAL citizen.

    W
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

  8. #38

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    IMHO, this will make them go home: make them pay income taxes, hospitalization and education costs; eliminate communications in Spanish (we have hundreds of linguistic groups in this country); eliminate matricula consular usage; treat non-citizen lawbreakers with extraordinary harshness; and finally, require biologically based identification for all federal services, e.g., social security, food stamps, welfare, voting, etc.
    '58 Airedale

  9. #39

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    ALIPAC, that is a great post.

    I did a Google search on immigration and came up with an interesting article on PBS.org. It was about an operation run by the U.S. government, in which they ran an interior enforcement program designed to arrest and deport illegal aliens. http://www.pbs.org/kpbs/theborder/histo ... ne/20.html . Since it was not a politically correct period in our history, it was called Operation Wetback. Massive deportation can and should be done. I just wouldn't use the same name. If we give amnesty to the illegals, we give amnesty to those who hired them.

    As for Emiliano, I want his opinion on the subject. I don't want to hear from some liberal professor from Columbia University. I can cut and paste other peoples opinions all day long. Emiliano needs to educate himself and form his own opinion. Bottom line is I still think Emiliano is a plant attempting do destroy the reputation of this site.
    "Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Pat your enemies on the back until the right time comes, then take your revenge like a tiger. Never forget who conned you, hurt you or cheated you, regardless of who they are."

  10. #40
    Administrator ALIPAC's Avatar
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    82Marine89:

    Operation 'wetback' worked and it stopped the problem and sent the message.
    Join our efforts to Secure America's Borders and End Illegal Immigration by Joining ALIPAC's E-Mail Alerts network (CLICK HERE)

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